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By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2013
President Barack Obama has named an Annapolis man to head the multibillion-dollar grant program through which the Federal Emergency Management Agency helps local governments prepare for disasters. Brian Kamoie, 41, will oversee a vast portfolio of federal grants used by states and cities to prevent and respond to terrorism and other disasters, the White House said. Kamoie was most recently senior director for preparedness policy on the White House national security staff. Kamoie takes control of the FEMA grant program as the Obama administration pursues a controversial consolidation of $2 billion in preparedness funding it says will streamline a system that grew unwieldy following the attacks of Sept.
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NEWS
Peter Crispino and For The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2014
In the 2.3 acres surrounding Asbury Broadneck United Methodist Church, a subtle link to local history lies in a cemetery that dates back nearly 200 years. At least 1,800 graves - few with headstones, many belonging to former slaves - are on the grounds, each bearing a story and a key to the past. For the past 15 months, a dedicated team from the church has worked to identify each person buried there and perhaps even discover their stories. "It's important that we know who helped pave the way for us, because if this generation does not do it, I don't know what the next generation will do," said Elinor Thompson, who has led the effort.
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NEWS
October 25, 1994
The Columbia Council has established a grant program of $1,000 to fund community service projects initiated by high school students who live on Columbia Association-assessed property.Up to $250 will be awarded to those projects meeting the community service criteria established by the Columbia Council.Applications and a copy of the criteria are available at high schools, village centers, the Columbia Association at 10221 Wincopin Circle and the Members Service Center at The Mall in Columbia.
NEWS
July 28, 2014
It didn't take Democrats much time to denounce Rep. Paul Ryan's latest plan for addressing poverty in this country. The main feature of the Republican's proposed "Opportunity Grant" would be to roll a lot of social welfare programs together and leave it mostly to states to decide how the money is spent, which sounds a great deal like the block grant proposals of the past. Critics included Maryland's own Rep. Chris Van Hollen, ranking member on the House Budget Committee, who said the former vice presidential nominee has used the mantra of "reform" as a cover to cut safety-net programs.
NEWS
By Jenny Hopkinson and Jenny Hopkinson,SUN REPORTER | June 9, 2007
A group of Pinewood Elementary School students descended on the stream next to their school yesterday afternoon. They dug holes, planted trees, and caught and released crawfish, all in an effort to learn about the environment by cleaning up the water near the Timonium school. They worked - but no one seemed to notice the heat. "We've been out in the sun for a while," 7-year-old Morgan McCanie said, "so I'm used to it now." The project was paid for through a Baltimore County school system program designed to promote environmental education.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2012
More than 200 years into the life of their family farm, Tim and Mitzi Jones decided their future should include cheese.  Bowling Green Farm has been producing milk from about 100 Holsteins and has been in the milk business since the 1920s. A few years ago, however, they realized milk wasn't enough. "There is no money in milk at this point," says Mitzi Jones, whose husband's family has owned the farm since the late 1700s. Sitting on 400 acres in the Sykesville area, Bowling Green Farm is one of three dairy farms still in business in Howard County, compared with about 300 in the 1960s, according to the county's economic development agency.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | January 3, 2013
The Federal Emergency Management Agency will grant Baltimore County disaster aid to help pay for damage from Superstorm Sandy, officials announced Thursday. Under the grant program, the federal government will reimburse the county for expenses, including storm preparation, debris removal and damage to public facilities related to the October storm. Officials estimate that storm preparations and damage cost the county $3.4 million, said county public safety spokeswoman Elise Armacost.
NEWS
By James Drew and James Drew,Sun Reporter | October 17, 2007
A Baltimore City lawmaker says he will introduce legislation to give the city and other relatively poor jurisdictions a greater share of state grant dollars. Del. Keith E. Haynes, a Democrat, says he wants to change the formula of a program designed to account for differences in the ability of governments to raise revenue from local income taxes. His bill would increase the total that Baltimore City receives under the disparity grant program from $78 million to $107 million, he said. Haynes, a member of the House Appropriations Committee, said the special session set to start Oct. 29 is an "opportunity to strategically leverage this unique opportunity to fight for Baltimore."
NEWS
January 2, 2009
CLAIBORNE PELL, 90 U.S. senator, creator of Pell Grants Claiborne Pell, the quirky blueblood who represented blue-collar Rhode Island in the U.S. Senate for 36 years and was the force behind a grant program that has helped tens of millions of Americans attend college, died yesterday at his Newport home after a long battle with Parkinson's disease. Mr. Pell, a Democrat, spoke with an aristocratic tone but was an unabashed liberal who spent his political career championing causes to help the less fortunate.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Staff Writer | December 24, 1992
Federal and state officials have given a six-month reprieve to a highly touted Baltimore City Circuit Court program that was facing the ax.The community service program, which allows judges to assign nonviolent offenders to supervised public service in lieu of a jail term, was scheduled to end Jan. 1 because of the city's budget shortfall.Yesterday, state officials announced that the U.S. Justice Department has agreed to allow Maryland to use $97,000 from a federal block grant program to keep the program running through June 30. The money will be used to pay the salaries of the employees who place offenders in community work and monitor their attendance.
NEWS
March 14, 2014
Home, life expo Event designed to provide information related to simplifying care of home and family will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. April 5 at the Holy Grounds Youth Center, 623 Baltimore-Annapolis Blvd. in Severna Park. Expo features informational exhibits from businesses whose focus is making life easier. Lunch, refreshments and activities will be available for children. Information: 410-562-1087. Mother's Day Tea Women and girls of all ages grieving the death of their mother or grandmother are invited to a Mother's Day Tea at noon Sunday, May 4, at the Chesapeake Life Center, 90 Ritchie Highway in Pasadena.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn and The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2013
Football players at Douglass have a full-time academic coach this fall helping them not just to improve their grades, but to navigate the requirements for college admission. The 1st and Goal program is a pilot initiative designed by the Family League of Baltimore. Douglass received a grant from NFL Player Engagement to fund the program, which focuses on improving all aspects of student athletes' lives. Douglass athletic director Tina Queen said she hopes to expand the program next fall to include all sports, but because more student athletes play football than any other sport at the school, the 1st and Goal program is expected to have an immediate impact.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2013
Dr. Craig Hendrix is exploring a novel concept: whether antiviral drugs can be absorbed through certain areas of the body to prevent sexual transmission of HIV. To test such hypotheses, Hendrix and his Johns Hopkins colleagues typically can put up healthy test subjects in hospital beds overnight, which creates a more effective experiment by allowing for more data collection and limiting outside variables. But volunteers in Hendrix's study are sleeping in a hotel between two long days of blood-drawing and CT scans because of a funding squeeze in a innovative federal grant program.
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2013
The port of Baltimore has applied for a $10 million federal grant — to be matched by a state grant of $19.5 million — to expand rail access and export storage at Fairfield Marine Terminal and to widen the access channel to Seagirt Marine Terminal. The proposal, which Maryland Port Administration commissioners approved Tuesday, would tap into a $473.8 million pot called TIGER 5 funds that the U.S. Department of Transportation will distribute this fall. Plans include dredging the approach to Seagirt to handle the widest ships in the world and using some of that material to fill a World War II-vintage basin at Fairfield to create 7.6 acres for car and heavy equipment storage.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2013
President Barack Obama has named an Annapolis man to head the multibillion-dollar grant program through which the Federal Emergency Management Agency helps local governments prepare for disasters. Brian Kamoie, 41, will oversee a vast portfolio of federal grants used by states and cities to prevent and respond to terrorism and other disasters, the White House said. Kamoie was most recently senior director for preparedness policy on the White House national security staff. Kamoie takes control of the FEMA grant program as the Obama administration pursues a controversial consolidation of $2 billion in preparedness funding it says will streamline a system that grew unwieldy following the attacks of Sept.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | April 28, 2013
A $1.5 million federal grant will help pay for rebuilding the downtown Annapolis City Dock, including upgrades to stormwater management controls to reduce frequent flooding. "City Dock is arguably the city's most important asset, and first and foremost, we need to be responsible stewards of the assets we have," said Annapolis Mayor Josh Cohen. An overall $12.5 million rehabilitation project for the dock involves stabilizing and rebuilding 700 linear feet of City Dock's bulkhead, as well as the stormwater measures and upgrading slips used by transient boaters who visit Annapolis.
NEWS
By Sarah Schaffer and Sarah Schaffer,SUN STAFF | February 10, 2005
The Annapolis Fire Department has been awarded $225,000 in a federal grant to purchase a new fire and rescue boat that will serve the historic port and waterways of several counties, city officials announced yesterday. The funds were provided by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security under the Assistance to Firefighters Grant Program and will be combined with a $25,000 contribution from the city, said Fire Chief Michael P. Lonergan. The award is part of $750 million that was distributed through the program to departments nationwide.
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