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ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | June 13, 1999
There was a slew of celebrities, in person and on paper, at the Grant-A-Wish Celebrity Benefit and Auction. Mingling in a mob of 600 at Martin's West, you could spot sports celebs such as former Colts Lenny Moore and Bruce Laird, and current Ravens player Spencer Folau. Or you could focus on local TV types such as WJZ's Richard Sher and WMAR's Sandra Pinckney.Movie stars shone during the silent auction. TV scripts and photos featured autographs from the likes of Kim Basinger, Eddie Murphy and Clint Eastwood.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 14, 2004
Gala fund-raisers are supposed to raise money for nonprofits, but a couple of recent parties were also raising spirits. Take the 22nd annual Benefit and Auction for the Believe In Tomorrow National Children's Foundation, which is headquartered here in B-more. (If the name doesn't sound familiar, you may remember it by its previous moniker, Grant-A-Wish Foundation.) The very nature of the organization -- helping kids with life-threatening illnesses and their families -- is heart-warming in itself.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | December 2, 2001
Once again, the annual benefit and auction for Grant-A-Wish / The Children's Promise Foundation was a star-studded event, both on paper and in person. About 500 guests roamed the BWI Marriott Hotel ballroom, perusing a plethora of celebrity paraphernalia. They entered their bids on photos, scripts and other goodies signed by entertainment and sports stars like: Alanis Morissette, Jimmy Carter, Henry Winkler, Hasim Rahman, Don Shula, Tom Matte, Art Donovan, Doug Flutie and the stars of the TV shows Friends and Spin City.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | January 10, 2003
It started with a dying girl who wanted nothing more than a pair of green roller skates. Within a few years, the Grant-A-Wish Foundation was fulfilling all kinds of dreams for children with life-threatening diseases, from meetings with Cher and Hulk Hogan to a trip to Australia to study marsupials. But now, 20 years after its founding, the Catonsville-based charity has left the wish business - a field that had become expensive, crowded with competitors and, its organizers say, at odds with its evolving mission of helping sick youngsters focus on hope and survival.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,Staff Writer | October 11, 1992
Nothing like it existed in 1957 when Joe Schneider' 2-year-old son was dying of leukemia."It would have been so much better," Mr. Schneider said yesterday, gazing at Grant-A-Wish Foundation's Children's House on McElderry Street. "We could have lived with our child like a family, instead of renting rooms and driving back and forth from Baltimore to the hospital in Bethesda."Mr. Schneider and a bus load of good-hearted good-timers from Brooklyn Park toured the handsome brick building yesterday to see and touch the results of parties and bull roasts and dances that raised $100,000 over the past two years.
FEATURES
By Linda Geeson and Linda Geeson,Ocean City Bureau of The Sun | May 31, 1991
Ocean City While 3-year-old A. J. runs around the deck of the outdoor pool at the Sea Watch condominiums, his mother, Jean Bauguess, is in hot pursuit. "OK, A. J., you can stop now. Put your piggies in the water," she coaxes the mischievous little boy.Just like other vacationers, the West Virginia factory worker and her children, Anthony "A. J." McColl and 7-year-old Christina Bauguess, are here for the week to swim, build sand castles and visit the boardwalk, trying to do what the ads suggest and "capture an ocean memory."
NEWS
By Greg Tasker | December 16, 1991
A holiday carnival at Martin's West in Woodlawn yesterday featured typical children's party fare: red and green balloons, hamburgers and french fries, magicians, face-painting and games.The normalcy was intended because the guests -- 120 children from the oncology units at Johns Hopkins, the University of Maryland Hospital and Sinai Hospital -- have led anything but normal lives since being diagnosed with cancer."We wanted these children and their families to get together in a relaxed atmosphere and socialize in a different setting," said Brian R. Morrison, executive director of The Grant-A-Wish Foundation and The Children's House at Johns Hopkins Hospital.
NEWS
By Pat Brodowski and Pat Brodowski,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 22, 1999
HAMPSTEAD GOLFER Paul Kraushofer has a knack for coordinating golfers and corporate sponsors into popular tournaments that yield substantial contributions to nonprofit groups.This year, he organized a golf tournament that raised more than $2,000 for the Grant-A-Wish Foundation."I'd rather be able to give than to be needing help, and I'm thankful I can do so," Kraushofer said. "People enjoy the game, and the foundation benefits, so it's a winning combination."Grant-A-Wish Foundation, founded in 1982, is a comprehensive charitable assistance program based in Baltimore that offers experiences for the critically ill child and the family throughout the child's illness.
BUSINESS
By Audrey Haar | December 9, 1990
The Grant-A-Wish Foundation has been granting wishes for critically ill children since 1982.Now the Baltimore-based organization has its own wish list: concrete, drywall, furniture and all types of labor to build a home-away-from-home for the families of children being treated at Johns Hopkins Hospital.Baltimore land developer Stewart Greenebaum and his wife, Marlene, of Brooklandville made the initial donation of $800,000, and other businesses and labor unions started pitching in recently to help build what is called the Children's House at Johns Hopkins.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Staff Writer | August 11, 1992
By now, Children's House was to have opened its doors and begun caring for families of children receiving emergency treatment at nearby Johns Hopkins Hospital.Designed to provide temporary living quarters for up to 16 families at a time, it was becoming a national symbol of volunteerism, representing more than $1.4 million worth of donated materials and labor.But a severe last-minute shortage of volunteer workers has brought work to a halt on the four-level building on McElderry Street, across from the hospital's Wolfe Street entrance.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | June 23, 2002
Laurel Gaffney has seen a lot of wishes come and go. "Our most popular request is Disney World. Close seconds are shopping sprees and computers," said Gaffney, the official wish coordinator of the Mid-Atlantic Make-A-Wish Foundation, which grants reasonable desires of kids with life-threatening illnesses. "But [Emily Davis'] wish is one of the most creative." Thirteen-year-old Emily, who's living with a form of bone cancer called Ewing's sarcoma, didn't wish for new clothes or a family vacation.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | December 2, 2001
Once again, the annual benefit and auction for Grant-A-Wish / The Children's Promise Foundation was a star-studded event, both on paper and in person. About 500 guests roamed the BWI Marriott Hotel ballroom, perusing a plethora of celebrity paraphernalia. They entered their bids on photos, scripts and other goodies signed by entertainment and sports stars like: Alanis Morissette, Jimmy Carter, Henry Winkler, Hasim Rahman, Don Shula, Tom Matte, Art Donovan, Doug Flutie and the stars of the TV shows Friends and Spin City.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Complied by David M. Graves | October 26, 2000
Barry Manilow's 'Copacabana' You've seen him on TV's "The Love Boat" as Captain Stubing and as the sharp-tongued Murray on "The Mary Tyler Moore Show." Now catch Gavin McLeod onstage at the Lyric Opera House Tuesday through Nov. 5 in Barry Manilow's musical "Copacabana." This tale of love and romance, set in the swinging 1940s nightclub scene, is filled with dazzling costumes and choreography. And it has Manilow's Grammy-winning title song, which inspired it. You know how it begins: "Her name was Lola, she was a showgirl.
SPORTS
By Sam Borden and Sam Borden,SUN STAFF | June 8, 2000
Brian Morrison has spent 18 years helping children as the founder and executive director of the Grant-A-Wish Foundation, all the while being a lacrosse fan on the side. Finally, the two shall meet. Lacrosse will invade UMBC this weekend, as the first Middle Atlantic Youth Lacrosse Festival showcases clinics, games and fun, all in the name of a worthy cause. For Morrison, the key to this event was the purity of its inception -- a desire to create a weekend where kids could have fun, while helping an organization that does everything it can to support children with life-threatening diseases.
NEWS
By Pat Brodowski and Pat Brodowski,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 22, 1999
HAMPSTEAD GOLFER Paul Kraushofer has a knack for coordinating golfers and corporate sponsors into popular tournaments that yield substantial contributions to nonprofit groups.This year, he organized a golf tournament that raised more than $2,000 for the Grant-A-Wish Foundation."I'd rather be able to give than to be needing help, and I'm thankful I can do so," Kraushofer said. "People enjoy the game, and the foundation benefits, so it's a winning combination."Grant-A-Wish Foundation, founded in 1982, is a comprehensive charitable assistance program based in Baltimore that offers experiences for the critically ill child and the family throughout the child's illness.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | June 13, 1999
There was a slew of celebrities, in person and on paper, at the Grant-A-Wish Celebrity Benefit and Auction. Mingling in a mob of 600 at Martin's West, you could spot sports celebs such as former Colts Lenny Moore and Bruce Laird, and current Ravens player Spencer Folau. Or you could focus on local TV types such as WJZ's Richard Sher and WMAR's Sandra Pinckney.Movie stars shone during the silent auction. TV scripts and photos featured autographs from the likes of Kim Basinger, Eddie Murphy and Clint Eastwood.
NEWS
By JEAN LESLIE | April 11, 1994
This year, VFW's state commander and state Ladies Auxiliary president have designated the Grant-A-Wish Foundation as a special project.As you may know, the Grant-A-Wish Foundation acts as a fairy godmother/godfather to help cheer terminally ill children.Our local VFW is doing its part this week by holding a Bingo game at the post from noon to 3 p.m. Saturday. Proceeds will be turned over to the Maryland Ladies Auxiliary, which will give the money to the Grant-A-Wish Foundation. The money will go to help Maryland children.
NEWS
By Amy Oakes and Amy Oakes,SUN STAFF | September 24, 1998
Since he was 3, Brian Terrell has idealized police officers and aspired to become one. Yesterday, he got his wish.Brian, 8, became an honorary Baltimore City police officer at Johns Hopkins Children's Center with the help of the Police Department and the Grant-A-Wish Foundation. Before more than dozen officers, Brian, who has been diagnosed with life-threatening hepatitis C, was inducted into the department by Commissioner Thomas C. Frazier.Brian said little, but recited the officer's pledge and saluted the commissioner.
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