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By Jack W. Germond and Jack W. Germond,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 6, 2000
MILFORD, N.H. - The foliage is long past its prime here, and so is the presidential campaign of 2000. Just over nine months ago, New Hampshire was the nation's political capital, the scene of bitterly contested primaries in both parties. This was the place where Sen. John McCain, riding his Straight Talk Express bus, electrified the political world by defeating George W. Bush by 18 percentage points in the Republican primary. This was also the place where Bill Bradley, the former senator from New Jersey, threw a scare into Vice President Al Gore in the Democratic primary before losing narrowly after committing a series of campaign blunders.
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NEWS
January 6, 2008
With just five days available for campaigning between Thursday night's Iowa caucuses and this Tuesday's New Hampshire primaries, the leading candidates have raced to the Granite State to begin a frenzy of campaigning. On the road, again, they offered a bizarrely entertaining array of photo-ops.
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NEWS
January 6, 2008
With just five days available for campaigning between Thursday night's Iowa caucuses and this Tuesday's New Hampshire primaries, the leading candidates have raced to the Granite State to begin a frenzy of campaigning. On the road, again, they offered a bizarrely entertaining array of photo-ops.
NEWS
By Lisa Rogak | August 28, 2007
Here we go again. Michigan has joined Florida and South Carolina to become the latest to muscle in on New Hampshire's first-in-the-nation turf in an effort to reduce the influence this cold, flinty state has in deciding who makes it to the Oval Office. Talk is of a Jan. 15 primary, though Michigan's Sen. Carl Levin, a Democrat, favors Jan. 8. This means Granite Staters would cast their ballots sometime between polishing off the last of the Christmas eggnog and toasting the New Year, all because the New Hampshire constitution requires the presidential primary be held a week before any others.
NEWS
By Lisa Rogak | August 28, 2007
Here we go again. Michigan has joined Florida and South Carolina to become the latest to muscle in on New Hampshire's first-in-the-nation turf in an effort to reduce the influence this cold, flinty state has in deciding who makes it to the Oval Office. Talk is of a Jan. 15 primary, though Michigan's Sen. Carl Levin, a Democrat, favors Jan. 8. This means Granite Staters would cast their ballots sometime between polishing off the last of the Christmas eggnog and toasting the New Year, all because the New Hampshire constitution requires the presidential primary be held a week before any others.
FEATURES
By Lara M. Zeises and Lara M. Zeises,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | June 12, 1997
Forget "Live Free or Die." New Hampshire may soon have to change the famed motto adorning its license plates to "Good Place to Buy."New Hampshire, home to America's most dyed-in-the-wool Yankees, is suddenly the hottest spot in the United States, according to Money magazine. In its much-debated annual survey of the country's best places to live, Money has named Nashua, N.H., No. 1. And it's not alone at the top. Its Granite State neighbors Portsmouth and Manchester were ranked fifth and sixth best places to live.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,Sun Staff Correspondent | January 12, 1992
DOVER, N.H. -- Steaming mounds of meatballs and grilled chicken wings lie untouched. Pretzels and chips get few takers. Even the bar is deserted.As 150 New Hampshire voters jam a function room at the Friendship Inn for a chance to hear Democratic candidateArkansas Gov. Bill Clinton, they are far more interested in diving for good seats than free food.With the presidential primary just five weeks away, voters here are hungry for answers.At small gatherings from the White Mountains to the coast, they're peppering the candidates with hard questions about restoring prosperity to this once-booming corner of the country.
NEWS
By Lawrence Freeny | February 18, 1992
Granite boulders shear and rumble,Stirred by muddied snow to tumble.Spring brings also THAT. What is it?The Windy Sweeps political visit.Farewell, Doug, not known so well;Paul, Tom and Bill stayed quite a spell;They, speaking on with Jerryand Kerrey,Made us long for "Give 'em hell Harry."When Dave and Pat came on real loud,George himself filled out the crowd.We'll vote our say, now that'sfor certain.But, heck, there is no granite curtain:Snowbirds, leafers, summerfolk,come on --It's best when politicking's gone!
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,Staff Correspondent | February 7, 1992
CONCORD, N.H. -- The Bush camp yesterday brought out its biggest gun to boost support for the president in recession-weary New Hampshire.And once again, Barbara Bush took up the crusade. Gracefully waltzing through a daylong swing through the state, she signed autographs, petted puppies and generally charmed the crowds, some of whom were clearly less enthralled with her husband than with the ever-popular first lady."I'm a Barbara Bush supporter," said Newport resident Marie Bugbee, waiting at the Power House Mall in West Lebanon for a glimpse of the first lady.
NEWS
January 27, 2004
"President Truman looks upon presidential preference and delegate primaries in the states as a lot of eyewash," The Sun reported Feb. 1, 1952. "He thinks they make very little impression on the delegates who meet in national party conventions and actually do the nominating; he suspects they don't mean a thing. "For these reasons, he sees no sense in having his name entered in the various spring primary contests. Moreover, and more importantly, he figures that if he wants renomination this year he can get it without bothering with the `skirmishes' in the states.
NEWS
January 27, 2004
"President Truman looks upon presidential preference and delegate primaries in the states as a lot of eyewash," The Sun reported Feb. 1, 1952. "He thinks they make very little impression on the delegates who meet in national party conventions and actually do the nominating; he suspects they don't mean a thing. "For these reasons, he sees no sense in having his name entered in the various spring primary contests. Moreover, and more importantly, he figures that if he wants renomination this year he can get it without bothering with the `skirmishes' in the states.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jack W. Germond,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 6, 2000
MILFORD, N.H. - The foliage is long past its prime here, and so is the presidential campaign of 2000. Just over nine months ago, New Hampshire was the nation's political capital, the scene of bitterly contested primaries in both parties. This was the place where Sen. John McCain, riding his Straight Talk Express bus, electrified the political world by defeating George W. Bush by 18 percentage points in the Republican primary. This was also the place where Bill Bradley, the former senator from New Jersey, threw a scare into Vice President Al Gore in the Democratic primary before losing narrowly after committing a series of campaign blunders.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jack W. Germond,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 30, 2000
CONCORD, N.H. -- The New Hampshire presidential primary is, of course, a serious exercise. But it has its moments, like the time the candidate pulled out a rubber rat and waved it at the cameras during a televised debate. That happened in 1972. The candidate was a self-described urban activist from Hartford named Ned Coll who used the rat to underline his point that there were still a lot of problems in U.S. cities. That episode also makes a central point about the presidential primary elections here: Because they are first on the schedule every four years, they attract huge media attention.
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 19, 2000
PITTSFIELD, N.H. -- Troubled by polls placing him behind Sen. John McCain in New Hampshire, Texas Gov. George W. Bush bolted from Iowa just six days before the caucuses and swept into this state yesterday, hoping to knock his surging Republican rival from the presidential race before it really begins. But instead of swaggering in to deal a knockout blow, Bush seemed tentative and defensive. And the very sight of him campaigning half a nation away from Iowa, less than a week before the first votes of the presidential campaign are to be cast there, was testament to how much of a battleground the Granite State has become.
FEATURES
By Lara M. Zeises and Lara M. Zeises,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | June 12, 1997
Forget "Live Free or Die." New Hampshire may soon have to change the famed motto adorning its license plates to "Good Place to Buy."New Hampshire, home to America's most dyed-in-the-wool Yankees, is suddenly the hottest spot in the United States, according to Money magazine. In its much-debated annual survey of the country's best places to live, Money has named Nashua, N.H., No. 1. And it's not alone at the top. Its Granite State neighbors Portsmouth and Manchester were ranked fifth and sixth best places to live.
NEWS
By Lawrence Freeny | February 18, 1992
Granite boulders shear and rumble,Stirred by muddied snow to tumble.Spring brings also THAT. What is it?The Windy Sweeps political visit.Farewell, Doug, not known so well;Paul, Tom and Bill stayed quite a spell;They, speaking on with Jerryand Kerrey,Made us long for "Give 'em hell Harry."When Dave and Pat came on real loud,George himself filled out the crowd.We'll vote our say, now that'sfor certain.But, heck, there is no granite curtain:Snowbirds, leafers, summerfolk,come on --It's best when politicking's gone!
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 19, 2000
PITTSFIELD, N.H. -- Troubled by polls placing him behind Sen. John McCain in New Hampshire, Texas Gov. George W. Bush bolted from Iowa just six days before the caucuses and swept into this state yesterday, hoping to knock his surging Republican rival from the presidential race before it really begins. But instead of swaggering in to deal a knockout blow, Bush seemed tentative and defensive. And the very sight of him campaigning half a nation away from Iowa, less than a week before the first votes of the presidential campaign are to be cast there, was testament to how much of a battleground the Granite State has become.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jack W. Germond,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 30, 2000
CONCORD, N.H. -- The New Hampshire presidential primary is, of course, a serious exercise. But it has its moments, like the time the candidate pulled out a rubber rat and waved it at the cameras during a televised debate. That happened in 1972. The candidate was a self-described urban activist from Hartford named Ned Coll who used the rat to underline his point that there were still a lot of problems in U.S. cities. That episode also makes a central point about the presidential primary elections here: Because they are first on the schedule every four years, they attract huge media attention.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,Staff Correspondent | February 7, 1992
CONCORD, N.H. -- The Bush camp yesterday brought out its biggest gun to boost support for the president in recession-weary New Hampshire.And once again, Barbara Bush took up the crusade. Gracefully waltzing through a daylong swing through the state, she signed autographs, petted puppies and generally charmed the crowds, some of whom were clearly less enthralled with her husband than with the ever-popular first lady."I'm a Barbara Bush supporter," said Newport resident Marie Bugbee, waiting at the Power House Mall in West Lebanon for a glimpse of the first lady.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,Sun Staff Correspondent | January 12, 1992
DOVER, N.H. -- Steaming mounds of meatballs and grilled chicken wings lie untouched. Pretzels and chips get few takers. Even the bar is deserted.As 150 New Hampshire voters jam a function room at the Friendship Inn for a chance to hear Democratic candidateArkansas Gov. Bill Clinton, they are far more interested in diving for good seats than free food.With the presidential primary just five weeks away, voters here are hungry for answers.At small gatherings from the White Mountains to the coast, they're peppering the candidates with hard questions about restoring prosperity to this once-booming corner of the country.
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