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By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2011
John Lawrence started coming to the Preakness in 1987, when he moved from a little town in Pennsylvania to York, Pa. He told friends back in Leechburg, Pa., about 35 miles northeast of Pittsburgh, that he had just attended “the biggest party I had ever been to.” Thus was born an annual event when Lawrence and a group of boyhood friends and relatives come to Baltimore for the Preakness. The numbers grew to as many as 20, but today there were only seven, representing three generations of Leechburg families.
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NEWS
January 18, 2013
Haven't we had enough of Gov. Martin O'Malley's political grandstanding? Trying to one-up New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo is not a substitute for governing ("O'Malley to focus on guns," Jan. 10). Maryland already has more gun laws than necessary. Pandering to President Obama's base is too much. Fact: Less than 1 percent of criminals convicted of gun violence used an assault rifle, and even fewer obtained those weapons at a gun show. Mr. O'Malley is great on the hot-button issues but not so much on less politically charged problems.
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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Staff Writer | February 28, 1995
Westminster High School's 5,000-seat grandstand is unsafe and is to be closed to spectators until completion of repairs costing an estimated $200,000.After two inspections of bleachers and a recommendation from the county's insurer, the Carroll County Board of Education has put the home grandstand off limits for the spring sports season and possibly for longer.The stadium needs a complete overhaul, officials said."The stands are removed from service until we can accomplish )) repairs recommended by an independent bleachers manufacturer," said Vernon F. Smith, director of school support services.
SPORTS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2012
"Black-Eyed Susans! Get 'em here!" Emanuel Sabedra shouted inside the front gates, above the excited throngs and circling planes and buzzing engines of golf carts zipping by. Sabedra, dressed in maroon and gold jockey shirt, has been hawking the $9 cocktails at Preakness for 12 years. By 11 a.m., he had sold five racks of 24. Butch Hoppe, a 24-year-old trucking company owner, had his first taste of the Preakness staple. "It's alright," he said. "I got it for the souvenir cup more than the drink.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | June 21, 2001
Officials of the Maryland Jockey Club and Anne Arundel County will meet next week to discuss what has become a vexing problem at Laurel Park. For several months, large windows encasing the front of the grandstand side of the clubhouse have been cracking "much like in an automobile," said Lou Raffetto, the MJC's chief operating officer. "Tap it out, and there's a big mess. ... It's bewildering." Laurel, serving as a simulcasting site, is to reopen for 13 days of live racing Aug. 8, days that could be shifted to Pimlico, Raffetto said.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Sun Staff Writer | March 1, 1995
Money from a county land-acquisition fund could pay for renovation of the home grandstand at the Westminster High School stadium in time for the fall sports season, Vernon Smith, director of support services for Carroll County Schools, said yesterday."
NEWS
By David Michael Ettlin | September 30, 1990
The grandstand building at the old Freestate Raceway was heavily damaged yesterday afternoon in a three-alarm arson fire, the state fire marshal's office reported.A motorist driving past the closed harness track, just east of U.S. 1 in Laurel, noticed heavy smoke and reported the fire about noon, said Bob Thomas, spokesman for the state fire marshal.Firefighters from Howard and nearby Prince George's counties battled the blaze for an hour before it was declared under control. Most of the wooden grandstand collapsed as flames spread through the building.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | October 12, 1997
When you enter the first-floor grandstand at Laurel Park beginning Wednesday, the day horses will race again in Maryland, don't worry; you didn't take a wrong turn into the twilight zone.But what you see may shock you.While horses raced in Virginia -- and Delaware and New Jersey and Pennsylvania and -- workers at Laurel remodeled the first-floor grandstand.Gone are the betting windows in the middle of the room nearest the clubhouse. They've been replaced by a four-sided display of TVs that Martin P. Azola, vice president of facilities, describes as "the finest television display in any of our facilities.
NEWS
By Elise Armacost and Ross Peddicord 5/8 B | November 24, 1991
Four Prince George's County firefighters were injured last night in a three-alarm fire that heavily damaged the grandstand of the Rosecroft Raceway in Oxon Hill.A parking lot attendant saw the fire and reported it at 6:02 p.m. -- just an hour before harness racing fans were scheduled to file into the grandstand for the night's races, said Peter Piringer, a fire department spokesman.Post time was 7:30 p.m. Horses were starting to make their way from the paddock to the track when the fire broke out, Mr. Piringer said.
SPORTS
By Daniel Hong and Daniel Hong,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | July 23, 1997
Johns Hopkins University President William R. Brody broke ground yesterday on the construction of a new grandstand on the north side of Homewood Field.The grandstand, which will cost between $1.8 million and $2.3 million, will seat approximately 5,000, replacing the temporary bleachers erected during lacrosse season and bringing seating capacity to nearly 10,000 for lacrosse games.The project is expected to be completed in time for the Blue Jays' men's lacrosse opener against Princeton on Feb. 27.Built in 1906, Homewood Field is most often recognized as home for the men's lacrosse team, but it also serves the women's lacrosse, football, soccer, and field hockey programs.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Colin Campbell and The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2012
This year marks the second Preakness for both Dave Bowser and his girlfriend, Angela Alexander -- and both expect this experience to be quite different from their first. Bowser, 28, of Harbor East, first came to Pimlico while in college at Penn State. He said he spent a good amount of time then in the more rowdy infield and decided he'd "hang out on this side today," gesturing toward the grandstands. "I decided since I'm a big adult, I'll actually dress up a little bit," he said, tugging on his lightly-colored plaid tie. Alexander, a 29-year-old Silver Spring resident, said her experience in college was similar to Bowser's, and that she too expected to spend less time in the infield this year.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | October 14, 2011
Deep in the bowels of Laurel Park, beneath the oval where Secretariat, Seabiscuit and Barbaro once tread, runs a tunnel. It's a long-forgotten passage that bigwigs once used to escape the raucous crowds above. Queen Elizabeth II, who raced a horse at Laurel, passed here. So did Cary Grant, J. Edgar Hoover and Tip O'Neill. Elizabeth Taylor took the tunnel, en route to the winner's circle to present the trophy at the 1976 Washington D.C. International. In those 60 yards, folks recalled, the actress stopped to fix her hair.
SPORTS
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2011
Baltimore's party is over - and it was a grand one. A Grand Prix one, to be exact. But now it is time to put the carpet and the furniture back where they belong. Even before the last fan made it home from Baltimore's inaugural three-day IndyCar racing festival Sunday evening, the city and race organizers had begun the daunting task of removing 16 grandstands, several miles of concrete barriers topped with fencing - plus countless tents - in order to open downtown streets and sidewalks for the beginning of the workweek.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2011
Whoever that was who called me yesterday, and whatever it was I agreed to? I didn't mean it, I just couldn't hear you over the cars screeching past and the banner planes pounding overhead. Plus I was delirious from walking miles but merely going blocks. And addled by the perfume of diesel undertones overlaid by top notes of burning rubber. In other words, I have been grandly prixed. I'm not even sure what that means, but new words need to be invented for this whole, dizzying Grand Prix experience.
NEWS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2011
John Lawrence started coming to the Preakness in 1987, when he moved from a little town in Pennsylvania to York, Pa. He told friends back in Leechburg, Pa., about 35 miles northeast of Pittsburgh, that he had just attended “the biggest party I had ever been to.” Thus was born an annual event when Lawrence and a group of boyhood friends and relatives come to Baltimore for the Preakness. The numbers grew to as many as 20, but today there were only seven, representing three generations of Leechburg families.
SPORTS
By Baltimore Sun staff | May 20, 2011
We’ll be highlighting reader Preakness photos throughout Saturday's race day and want to see your pictures. Email photos from the infield or grandstand to coordinators@baltsun.com and visit baltimoresun.com/preakness to share pictures and look through images from past Preakness race days. With rain all week and the infield likely to be sloppy, let's try to keep the photos clean.  
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Evening Sun Staff | November 25, 1991
OXON HILL -- Arson was ruled out yesterday as the cause of the three-alarm blaze that destroyed much of the grandstand and forced the cancellation of the evening's racing card Saturday night at Rosecroft Raceway.Officials of the five-eighths-mile harness track said they hope to resume racing Wednesday night, the next regularly scheduled card.Peter Piringer, a spokesman for the Prince George's County Fire Department, said the cause of the fire, which started in a storage room in the second floor of the 42-year-old, 3,500-seat structure "looks electrical in nature, although it is still under investigation."
NEWS
March 13, 2011
Those who keep statistical records on the subject report that about 95 percent of terrorist incidents in this country are perpetrated by non-Muslims. Yet U.S. Rep. Peter King wants us to believe that his concentration on the 5 percent is justifiable and that vilifying an entire religious group because of the actions of a few of its members is justifiable, too. Further, he believes that critics of this action are guilty of mere "political correctness" — such a convenient whine when defending one's bigotry!
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