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By Ken Rosenthal and Ken Rosenthal,Sun Columnist | February 23, 1995
CLEARWATER, Fla. -- Now playing third base, a grandpa.Todd Cruz won't be called that because he's 39 years old.He'll be called it because, well, he's a grandfather."
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NEWS
Susan Reimer | December 11, 2013
Faithful readers of this column know that years ago, when my children were successfully out of diapers, we would send them for a week in the summer to their grandparents in Pittsburgh. It's not like my husband and I went to a Sandals resort during that week. He was usually traveling to cover the NFL, and I would use the week to go to work on my schedule instead of theirs. Joe and Jessie never asked to do anything while at Grandma and Grandpa's. No petting zoos. No carnivals. They would just lie in bed and watch cartoons on their own personal televisions, play and eat. Grandma would make piles of mashed potatoes and gravy for Joe, and there were ice cream sundaes for breakfast for Jessie.
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NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | January 16, 2004
THE TWO of them, Romero and Hancox, ready themselves to head back to the war. The final preparations seem like some traditional military ritual, or a kind of prayer. Standing there in their desert fatigues, talking about explosives hidden in the dusty Iraqi roadways, talking about the soldier shot in the stomach, talking about wives urging them to come back home in one piece, they're buying stuffed animals as forget-me-nots. Sgt. Neil Hancox, 22, saw his daughter, Miley, for the first two days of her life.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ericka Alston | January 25, 2013
Tonight's "American Idol" in Baton Rouge was the best episode thus far. We actually got to see more authentic talent than squabbles between the lady judges and misfits. It was awesome.  In the very beginning, we were introduced to Miss Baton Rouge herself, Megan Miller, who opted to postpone surgery on her leg to not miss her audition. Megan did us all a huge favor, siding with singing versus going under the knife. "I would let my leg fall off before I missed this audition," Megan said.
FEATURES
December 30, 1998
"I really enjoyed reading 'Chrysanthemum' by Kevin Henkes. This book is about a little mouse named Chrysanthemum, who loves her name until she starts school. Many children make fun of her because she is named after a flower. This makes her feel sad and different. In the end, a very special teacher, who is also named after a flower, makes them realize how very special Chrysanthemum's name is. I think the story teaches people to not only be yourself, but to like yourself, no matter what others think.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | February 2, 1996
Avoiding the temptation for cheap puns that a title like "Two Bits" coughs up, I can only say the movie isn't worth a whole lot in real dollars and cents.The physical production is the handsomest thing about the film, a loving work-up of a working-class Philadelphia neighborhood in the 1930s, where, in one of the trim houses, what remains of the Spirito family struggles glumly to survive the Depression.Except that the glumness hasn't set with the boy, Gennaro (Jerry Barone), who, far from noticing the economic chaos about him, instead is focused entirely on raising the necessary lucre (two bits, you're surprised?
FEATURES
By Karen Ackerman | November 25, 1998
Editor's note: When Grandpa opens an old trunk, and pulls out his bowler and gold-tipped cane, a vaudeville man suddenly comes to life, doing the old soft shoe for his favorite audience - his grandchildren.Grandpa was a song and dance man who once danced on the vaudeville stage.When we visit, he tells us about a time before people watched TV, back in the good old days, the song and dance days."Supper in an hour!" Grandma calls from the kitchen."I wonder if my tap shoes still fit?" Grandpa says with a smile.
NEWS
September 26, 2004
Haley Kittleman, 12, is one of 10 grandchildren of the late state Sen. Robert H. Kittleman. She lives with her father, Allan, and mother, Robin, her sister, Mary, and brothers, Robby and James, on the family farm in West Friendship. She delivered these remarks at a memorial service Tuesday for Robert Kittleman at Glenelg High School: Grandpa was an extraordinary man. He did so many things. He taught me how to play the clarinet. Grandpa would come over every day to help me practice. Instead of paying him, he paid us. He even was my piano accompanist for the Solo and Ensemble Festival.
NEWS
November 7, 1996
Hugh Bullock,98, a leading investment banker and the first U.S. citizen to receive the highest honor Britain bestows on foreigners, died Tuesday in New York after a series of strokes.He was head of Bullock Investment Advisory Co. of New York and headed more than a dozen firms during a career that began in the 1920s.He received numerous U.S. and international honors, including being the first U.S. citizen given the Order of the British Empire. Queen Elizabeth bestowed the honor upon him in 1976, during his 41-year tenure as president of the U.S. branch of the Pilgrims, a society promoting trans-Atlantic cooperation.
NEWS
By Warren Buckler | November 25, 1999
YOU COULD sense the tension as soon as we entered my grandparents' house at 806 Cathedral St. and began to ascend what looked to an impressionable 12-year-old like the Mount Everest of staircases. It led to the second-floor living quarters where, that year, we celebrated Thanksgiving.My grandfather, the first of three Warren Bucklers, came from a long line of prominent Baltimore healers and medical practitioners, a noble tradition upheld in my generation by my cousin, Dr. Billy Neill.They trace their medical lineage back to Dr. John Buckler, who enjoyed a large practice in the 1830s.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | September 11, 2009
No matter what your age or physical condition, you might feel like calling Dr. Jack Kevorkian after watching "Play the Game," a feeble comedy about a slick car salesman (Paul Campbell) and his attempt to push his endearing widowed grandfather (Andy Griffith) back into the dating scene. Grandpa Joe is alternately sly and out of it, until he becomes the "wild stallion" of his retirement village with the help of a genie in a bottle labeled Viagra. (His key love interests are played by Jerry Seinfeld's mom in "Seinfeld," Liz Sheridan, and Ray Romano's mom in "Everybody Loves Raymond," Doris Roberts.
NEWS
By Abigail Tucker and Abigail Tucker,SUN STAFF | July 17, 2005
The child drifted. She wore a pink life vest and the underpants she had gone swimming in. She held her drowned grandfather in her arms. Hours passed: one, two, then three. The sun started to sink over Herring Bay, and it rained. The child cried as the wind blew her farther out; sometimes, she screamed. But she never let go of her P-Pa, cradling his head above the water. The pair floated less than a thousand yards from shore, but to a 4-year-old girl, the shallows of the Chesapeake must have felt like the middle of the Atlantic.
NEWS
September 26, 2004
Haley Kittleman, 12, is one of 10 grandchildren of the late state Sen. Robert H. Kittleman. She lives with her father, Allan, and mother, Robin, her sister, Mary, and brothers, Robby and James, on the family farm in West Friendship. She delivered these remarks at a memorial service Tuesday for Robert Kittleman at Glenelg High School: Grandpa was an extraordinary man. He did so many things. He taught me how to play the clarinet. Grandpa would come over every day to help me practice. Instead of paying him, he paid us. He even was my piano accompanist for the Solo and Ensemble Festival.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | January 16, 2004
THE TWO of them, Romero and Hancox, ready themselves to head back to the war. The final preparations seem like some traditional military ritual, or a kind of prayer. Standing there in their desert fatigues, talking about explosives hidden in the dusty Iraqi roadways, talking about the soldier shot in the stomach, talking about wives urging them to come back home in one piece, they're buying stuffed animals as forget-me-nots. Sgt. Neil Hancox, 22, saw his daughter, Miley, for the first two days of her life.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 10, 2000
I have a Hewlett Packard Pavillion 166-megahertz Pentium that has been upgraded to 64 megabytes of RAM and a 10-gigabyte hard drive. The computer is highly adequate for what I do, but my grandson is pressuring me to purchase a new computer. He is 17 and says this computer stinks and he could do a lot with a new computer. Is this just a ploy to get a computer to play online games, or is there merit to his vague argument? We grandfathers are easy targets for this kind of scam by our grandkids, which is one of the really great things about being graced by having our children's children under foot.
NEWS
By Warren Buckler | November 25, 1999
YOU COULD sense the tension as soon as we entered my grandparents' house at 806 Cathedral St. and began to ascend what looked to an impressionable 12-year-old like the Mount Everest of staircases. It led to the second-floor living quarters where, that year, we celebrated Thanksgiving.My grandfather, the first of three Warren Bucklers, came from a long line of prominent Baltimore healers and medical practitioners, a noble tradition upheld in my generation by my cousin, Dr. Billy Neill.They trace their medical lineage back to Dr. John Buckler, who enjoyed a large practice in the 1830s.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Contributing Writer | March 5, 1993
The ancient Egyptians tried it and President Clinton's tax reform may preclude it, but the bottom line remains the same: "You Can't Take It With You."Those who think they can, or like to laugh at those who try, ought to see the Carroll Players' production of the George S. Kaufman and Moss Hart comedy of that name, opening tonight for eight performances at Frock's Sunnybrook Farm, 112 Bond St., Westminster.This brilliant satire about money, power, the political system and their effect on two very different families loses none of its original punch under the staging of veteran Carroll Players director Marcie Bogash.
NEWS
By Judy Reilly and Judy Reilly,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 22, 1999
LIFE'S PRETTY SIMPLE if you'd just relax," advises Martin "Grandpa" Vanderhof in "You Can't Take it With You," a three-act play being performed at Francis Scott Key High School this weekend.And Grandpa should know. Years earlier, he had walked away from a serious job to pursue the enjoyment of each moment in every day. He never looked back.The relaxed attitude of Grandpa, played by Doug Wilder, sets the mood for the humorous play, written in 1938 by Moss Hart and George S. Kaufman. Nothing bothers Grandpa -- not the Internal Revenue Service pressuring him for years' worth of unpaid taxes, not the chaos of the extended family that lives with him, not a trip to jail.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | October 28, 1999
IN THE NEWSPAPER the other day, there appeared an alarming story about veteran rockers Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young releasing a reunion album. I say "alarming" because there was also a photo of the group accompanying the story. And the photo was not, um, flattering. It looked like it was taken at a reunion of old buffalo hunters. Boy, do these guys look bad! Long, gray hair, unruly mustaches and sideburns, big guts, clothes that look like they were fished out of a Goodwill bin -- if this is what happens to rock stars in their golden years, a fatal drug overdose doesn't sound so bad. Anyway, looking at that picture, you were left with one overriding thought: I sure hope they sound better than they look.
NEWS
By Gregory Kane | October 9, 1999
SENOR SPENCES was on the move. He made a beeline from the pay phones and hooked a sharp left, heading up the spacious corridor that led from the D terminal at Baltimore-Washington International Airport toward the doors to the parking garage.His legs moving swiftly in his tiny blue jeans, Senor Spences darted left toward a small restaurant, then veered sharply right toward a bookstore. Further up the corridor, he spotted a little girl who had sat down on the floor. He plopped down to join her.Now he sits, I thought as I watched this bundle of energy, this whirling dervish of all 20-month-olds, calmly sitting in the middle of the terminal.
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