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By HANNELIESE PENNER | February 28, 1992
Last week as I was watching the Olympic bobsledding with my grandchildren I had a memory flashback and said quietly: ''I had a bobsled!''''You did?'' was their incredulous response, and I hastened to add: ''Yes, but not one as sleek as they have now.''I grew up in Hamburg, Germany, where the climate is very much like Baltimore's, with very little snow during the winter. When it falls, slopes and hills turn into playgrounds for children and their sleds.My grandmother was a statuesque woman, resolute, wise and my childhood companion.
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NEWS
By Justin George and Ian Duncan and The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2014
A Baltimore woman received a 40-year prison sentence Monday in the death of her 1-year-old grandson and abuse of her granddaughter after a judge said she rubbed methadone onto the children's gums before she put them to bed and headed off to a party. Towanda Reaves, 51, took responsibility for the boy's death but said she never meant to kill him. "This is not the intentional killing of her grandson, but those who think this was some form of tragic accident misunderstand the case, and misunderstand the jury's analysis of it," said Baltimore Circuit Judge Timothy Doory.
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NEWS
By KATHLEEN KENNEDY TOWNSEND | January 31, 1995
*TC Annapolis.-- I didn't really get to know my grandmother well -- Grandma as I called her -- until I reached adulthood and she was already 80. That's when she started to slow down. Until then I knew her mostly as the woman who would return my letters with red-penned grammatical corrections and as the ''baby sitter'' when my parents were away on trips.She corrected our table manners, put us to bed an hour early, took us to daily mass. She inquired whether our parents were taking us to sites of historical significance.
HEALTH
By Kit Waskom Pollard and For The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2014
Every Sunday, Monday, Wednesday and Thursday, around 6 in the evening, eight adults gather in a garage in the Allview Estates neighborhood in Columbia. The garage, which has been converted to a gym, serves as the training ground for this small group of serious athletes - powerlifters who spend two hours squatting, bench-pressing and dead-lifting their way to better health. One of those lifters - and the owner of the house - is Caryn Daniel. At 51, Daniel is a fundraiser for the Catholic Archdiocese of Washington, the mother and stepmother of four children ages 14 to 28, and grandmother of a 3-year-old.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | March 20, 2013
A Baltimore jury convicted a man of second degree murder for strangling his grandmother to death after he smoked PCP and heard voices warning him of evil people. Demond Tyler, 37, who lived with his grandmother, was at home in the 3200 block of Spaulding Avenue on Nov. 4, 2011 and told investigators that the voices said evil people would not look at him. Tyler then grabbed his grandmother, Shirley Tyler, 67, by the throat and demanded that she look him in the eye. He said the pair collapsed on a bed and she smiled at him, according to the state's attorney's office.
FEATURES
By Lesley Mackay and Lesley Mackay,Special to The Sun | November 2, 1994
In "The Deaths of Sybil Bolton," Baltimore resident Dennis McAuliffe Jr. probes the 1925 death of his maternal grandmother in order to learn more about his country, his family, and himself. His book attempts to make sense of an upsetting family discovery: His grandmother died not of illness, as had been thought, but of a gunshot wound. The author locates some evidence that Sybil Bolton committed suicide, but, unsatisfied with this version of events, he pursues the story further. He is haunted by a third explanation for her death at 22: He thinks she was murdered.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina, The Baltimore Sun | March 23, 2012
SARASOTA, Fla. - Each time Orioles outfielder Jai Miller crosses the plate after hitting a home run, his eyes turn upward and both of his hands point to the sky. It's a routine he's been doing since he was a teenager, one of many ways he tries to honor his mother and grandmother, both of whom he watched die in a car accident when he was 13 years old. But Miller's greatest tribute comes every day he's on a baseball field as he continues his...
NEWS
December 23, 1994
An Edgewater man was arrested Wednesday morning and charged with attacking his grandmother because she would not let him use her car, police said.Frances Mae Collins, 67, of the 200 block of Linden Ave. reported the attack about 1:30 a.m., police said. She told officers that her grandson, who lives with her, hit her and knocked her into a wall, injuring her back. Mrs. Collins is partly disabled and uses a cane.The grandson, Joseph Brian Wheeler, 30, claimed he hit his grandmother after she attacked him with the cane, police said.
NEWS
By Richard Irwin and Richard Irwin,Staff Writer | July 6, 1992
A 6-year-old boy weighing only 24 pounds was hospitalized pTC yesterday, and his grandmother and her boyfriend were arrested and charged with child abuse, city police said.The child, Maurice Royster, who will turn 7 next month, was listed in fair condition early today at the University of Maryland Medical Center.Police said the child was found in a first-floor room but told them he also had been locked in the basement of his home, a rowhouse in the 1500 block of N. Payson St., for an unknown amount of time.
NEWS
By Brent Jones | May 4, 2009
The grandmother of Olney native Sgt. James R. McIlvaine, killed Thursday in Iraq, characterized him as a man who longed to please his father, which is exactly what he did when became a Marine in 2001. Sergeant McIlvaine joined the Marines after attending Sherwood High School and graduating from a military school in Virginia. "His father was very patriotic, loved the flag and country," said Patty DeSimone, Sergeant McIlvaine's paternal grandmother, who said her grandson died in combat in Al Anbar province.
FEATURES
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2014
When the first contestants arrived at Roland Park Place retirement home bearing cards and flowers, residents and staff weren't sure what to make of them. But then it became clear: they were participants in an international scavenger hunt, organized by the grandson of a resident, Mrs. Doris Tippens. Tippens' grandson, Misha Collins, plays the complex angel, Castiel, on the CW show "Supernatural. "  He's also a bit of a real-life angel, organizing the " Greatest International Scavenger Hunt the World Has Ever Seen " (AKA #GISHWHES)
NEWS
By Rus VanWestervelt | May 5, 2014
Timonium resident and poet Ann Kolakowski says that what she discovered when her grandmother turned 99 has haunted her to this day. Now, nearly 12 years later, she has published a book of poetry about that discovery. "When my brothers and I were clearing out our grandmother's home when she moved to an assisted living facility," said Kolakowski, "I found a shabby notebook. I opened it and read, 'Marian Brown, Domestic Science/Warren School, Maryland.' I was really confused. " In fact, the town in which her grandmother, Florence Marian Brown Eichler, had spent her childhood and attended Warren School had been bought, razed and flooded in 1921 to create a municipal water supply.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | April 23, 2014
Now there are two. Two smart, tough and articulate women who could be president. Thirty years after Geraldine Ferraro became the first woman on the presidential ticket of a major party, we have two women who could easily lead that ticket in 2016. Hillary Clinton and Elizabeth Warren. It is almost an embarrassment of riches. Ms. Warren, the Democratic senator from Massachusetts who has made a populist name for herself fighting banks and Wall Street, just released the requisite autobiography, "A Fighting Chance.
NEWS
By Samantha Iacia, For The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2013
Date: Sept. 6, 2013 Her story: Jennifer Silk, 31, grew up in Perry Hall. She is a medical secretary at the Greater Baltimore Medical Center. Her father, John Willner, lives in Perry Hall. Her mother, Donna Snapp, and stepfather, John Snapp, live in Parkville. His story: Steven Burkhart, 29, was born in Pittsburgh but grew up in Coral Springs, Fla. When he was 13, he moved to Annapolis. He is on the heavy rescue unit for the Baltimore City Fire Department. His parents, Mary-Ann and Jeff Burkhart, live in Arnold.
FEATURES
By Samantha Iacia, For The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2013
Date: Aug. 9, 2013 Her story: Kristina Donahue, 28, grew up in Ellicott City. She graduated from University of Baltimore School of Law in May. She took the Maryland bar examination at the end of July and is now studying for the registration examination for patent cases. Her parents, Theresa and William Donahue, live in Elkridge.She lives in Catonsville. His story: Michael Tyler, 30, grew up in Severna Park. He is an undergraduate at University of Baltimore and plans to graduate in 2014.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | October 2, 2013
Today we revisit one of my favorite topics. Tomatoes. I bet you thought I was going to write about the government shutdown, but giving Congress ink is like giving a fool a microphone. So let's talk about tomatoes. I went to my favorite farmers' market in Annapolis this weekend and greedily filled my basket. I am hoarding against the possibility that a sudden storm will arrive and, although we need the rain, cause the last tomatoes in the field to swell and split and rot. The drought actually has been a boon to us tomato lovers.
NEWS
By GWINN OWENS | September 10, 2003
THE AGENT was authoritative. "Nobody move," he bellowed to the scores of people waiting in the security line at Baltimore-Washington International Airport. What was the crisis? An elderly couple were moving through the line, their hand luggage on the conveyor for X-ray scrutiny. The husband and his baggage moved through routinely. His wife, however, a grandmother of a certain age, got through the body search, but her hand luggage, on reaching the X-ray, stopped everything dead on the spot.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff writer | July 10, 1991
A century ago, a teen-age orphan named Dorothea Schmidt worked hard leading oxen and keeping house for a family that rewarded her with little more than moldy bread, thick milk and potatoes.Today, her namesake and granddaughter, Dorothea A. Gross, 74, is comfortably retired in her brick farmhouse off Lees Mill Road south of here, surrounded by 250 acres of fertile fields she leases out to another family to farm.But all the stories she had heard from her grandmother and then her mother still live with her, preserved in two small books Gross wrote and had published at her own expense by a vanity press -- a publishing house that will print anyone's book as long as they're willing to pay for it."
NEWS
By Linda DeMers Hummel | September 11, 2013
My personal brand is anemic. This according to the messages that have overrun my inbox lately, as my hunt for a new job slides into its third month. Self-proclaimed experts, mentors and coaches have arrived in droves, all bearing the same conclusion. Not that they actually use the word anemic, of course, which would be much too direct for folks who make their money swimming in pools of positive ambiguity. But here is what they do tell me: I need to kick it into high gear, punch it up a notch, and pass the 30-second resume test, which — at the moment — I am failing miserably.
NEWS
September 9, 2013
When Benjamin Jealous, at 35, became the youngest person ever to lead the NAACP in 2008, he took over an institution with a venerable name but whose greatest triumphs appeared to lie in the past. Mr. Jealous, who announced last week that he will step down from his post as president of the nation's oldest civil rights organization in January, quickly set about changing that, working to attract a younger generation of members with a more expansive vision of civil rights that addresses contemporary concerns.
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