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Grandma Moses

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By Zibby Oneal | September 1, 1999
Editor's note: A chapter from the life of the artist who painted primitive landscapes until her death at 101., One morning at breakfast, Anna Mary's father told her that he'd dreamed about her the night before. Anna Mary Robertson was a little girl and she was curious about that dream. "Was it good or bad, Pa?" "That depends on the future," her father replied. "Dreams cast their shadows before us."Her father had dreamed that he was standing in a room where many people were gathered, all of them shouting and clapping their hands.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | April 1, 2001
In 1940, when Anna Mary Robertson Moses was 80 years old, a New York art dealer happened to see some pictures she had submitted to a "women's exchange" in Hoosick Falls, a tiny, upstate farming community. Otto Kallir, who knew collectors who were interested in buying so-called primitive American art -- works by untrained artists that reflected the folk tradition -- decided to give the unknown painter a show in his gallery. Modestly titled "What a Farmwife Painted," the exhibition opened in October of that year, but initially attracted little notice.
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FEATURES
By Ralph Kovel and Terry Kovel and Ralph Kovel and Terry Kovel,KING FEATURES SYNDICATE | March 16, 1997
Rene Lalique was a famous French goldsmith, jeweler, glassmaker and artist who lived from 1860 to 1945.At first Lalique designed jewelry, including some for the actress Sarah Bernhardt. He used many semiprecious stones and also glass enameling and pieces of horn. Much of Bernhardt's jewelry was designed to look like flowers, insects and snakes.In the 1890s, Lalique began experimenting with glass for use in jewelry. By 1908 he was making molded glass perfume bottles for Francois Coty.Lalique continued to make all types of glass figures, vases and bowls, using clear and opalescent glass.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | March 15, 2001
Preservation Hall Jazz Band You don't have to travel to New Orleans to listen to the jazz sounds that evolved in that city around the turn of the last century. The Preservation Hall Jazz Band is bringing its traditional Big Easy music to Goucher College's Kraushaar Auditorium, 1021 Dulaney Valley Road. Beginning at 8 p.m. Saturday, the jazz ambassadors will present such legendary tunes as "In the Sweet Bye and Bye," "Because of You" and "When the Saints Go Marching In." The concert benefits Sheppard Pratt Health System's Care for Kids Fund.
NEWS
July 31, 1997
John Furze,55, a businessman who helped transform the Cayman Islands into a premier offshore banking center, died July 21 in George Town, Cayman Islands, of complications from heart surgery.Raymond "Jak" Jackson,70, the combative newspaper cartoonist known simply as "Jak" during more than 30 years of entertaining -- and occasionally outraging -- Londoners, died Sunday inLondon after surgery following a heart attack.Leo Loudenslager,53, who won the U.S. National Aerobatic Championships an unmatched seven consecutive times, died Monday in Nashville from injures he suffered in a June 28 motorcycle accident.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Staff Writer | December 18, 1992
When officials in Carroll County's Office of Economic Development wanted to promote the county's small-town flavor, they found a perfect match in artist Susan Davis.The Rockville watercolor artist, known for her New Yorker magazine covers and her work in Western Maryland College's alumni magazine, painted the 21 county scenes in the office's new promotional folder.The folder will be sent to companies interested in moving to Carroll County, as well as prospective investors."The reason we chose her [Ms. Davis]
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | March 15, 2001
Preservation Hall Jazz Band You don't have to travel to New Orleans to listen to the jazz sounds that evolved in that city around the turn of the last century. The Preservation Hall Jazz Band is bringing its traditional Big Easy music to Goucher College's Kraushaar Auditorium, 1021 Dulaney Valley Road. Beginning at 8 p.m. Saturday, the jazz ambassadors will present such legendary tunes as "In the Sweet Bye and Bye," "Because of You" and "When the Saints Go Marching In." The concert benefits Sheppard Pratt Health System's Care for Kids Fund.
FEATURES
By Anita Gold and Anita Gold,KNIGHT-RIDDER/TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE | October 15, 1995
I have a 5-inch, 1948 Motorola TV, model VT-71 with an original manual and a blue magnifying liquid bubble attached to the TV. It is not in working condition. How can I find out if its worth anything?For a free appraisal or to sell old radios and early television sets, whether working or not, or to check out their age, collectibility, or related parts or items, write to Vintage Radios and Television Sets Wanted for Cash, P.O. Box 214, Des Plaines, Ill. 60016. Enclose a photo or description of the item, stating their condition and including any wording or numbers they may have; also enclose a self-addressed stamped envelope for an evaluation, offer or reply.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | April 1, 2001
In 1940, when Anna Mary Robertson Moses was 80 years old, a New York art dealer happened to see some pictures she had submitted to a "women's exchange" in Hoosick Falls, a tiny, upstate farming community. Otto Kallir, who knew collectors who were interested in buying so-called primitive American art -- works by untrained artists that reflected the folk tradition -- decided to give the unknown painter a show in his gallery. Modestly titled "What a Farmwife Painted," the exhibition opened in October of that year, but initially attracted little notice.
NEWS
By DAVID ZURAWIK | January 30, 2009
Sunday Morning is turning 30, and the CBS mainstay is celebrating this weekend. If you have never seen the program - and sometimes it is the best thing on TV all weekend - think of it as an upbeat newsmagazine with a feel for humor and culture. Sunday, they will be looking at the way the world - including technology, popular culture and religion - has changed since the show made its debut three decades ago with Charles Kuralt as host. These days, it's the forever-in-bow ties Charles Osgood at the helm.
FEATURES
By Zibby Oneal | September 1, 1999
Editor's note: A chapter from the life of the artist who painted primitive landscapes until her death at 101., One morning at breakfast, Anna Mary's father told her that he'd dreamed about her the night before. Anna Mary Robertson was a little girl and she was curious about that dream. "Was it good or bad, Pa?" "That depends on the future," her father replied. "Dreams cast their shadows before us."Her father had dreamed that he was standing in a room where many people were gathered, all of them shouting and clapping their hands.
NEWS
July 31, 1997
John Furze,55, a businessman who helped transform the Cayman Islands into a premier offshore banking center, died July 21 in George Town, Cayman Islands, of complications from heart surgery.Raymond "Jak" Jackson,70, the combative newspaper cartoonist known simply as "Jak" during more than 30 years of entertaining -- and occasionally outraging -- Londoners, died Sunday inLondon after surgery following a heart attack.Leo Loudenslager,53, who won the U.S. National Aerobatic Championships an unmatched seven consecutive times, died Monday in Nashville from injures he suffered in a June 28 motorcycle accident.
FEATURES
By Ralph Kovel and Terry Kovel and Ralph Kovel and Terry Kovel,KING FEATURES SYNDICATE | March 16, 1997
Rene Lalique was a famous French goldsmith, jeweler, glassmaker and artist who lived from 1860 to 1945.At first Lalique designed jewelry, including some for the actress Sarah Bernhardt. He used many semiprecious stones and also glass enameling and pieces of horn. Much of Bernhardt's jewelry was designed to look like flowers, insects and snakes.In the 1890s, Lalique began experimenting with glass for use in jewelry. By 1908 he was making molded glass perfume bottles for Francois Coty.Lalique continued to make all types of glass figures, vases and bowls, using clear and opalescent glass.
FEATURES
By Anita Gold and Anita Gold,KNIGHT-RIDDER/TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE | October 15, 1995
I have a 5-inch, 1948 Motorola TV, model VT-71 with an original manual and a blue magnifying liquid bubble attached to the TV. It is not in working condition. How can I find out if its worth anything?For a free appraisal or to sell old radios and early television sets, whether working or not, or to check out their age, collectibility, or related parts or items, write to Vintage Radios and Television Sets Wanted for Cash, P.O. Box 214, Des Plaines, Ill. 60016. Enclose a photo or description of the item, stating their condition and including any wording or numbers they may have; also enclose a self-addressed stamped envelope for an evaluation, offer or reply.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Staff Writer | December 18, 1992
When officials in Carroll County's Office of Economic Development wanted to promote the county's small-town flavor, they found a perfect match in artist Susan Davis.The Rockville watercolor artist, known for her New Yorker magazine covers and her work in Western Maryland College's alumni magazine, painted the 21 county scenes in the office's new promotional folder.The folder will be sent to companies interested in moving to Carroll County, as well as prospective investors."The reason we chose her [Ms. Davis]
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff Writer | January 21, 1994
FREDERICK -- Helen Smith marks a century of life today, and, before a host of community officials and fans honor her at a luncheon at Hood College, the venerable woman will begin her day as she always does: painting in her home studio.By anyone's account, she has lived an extraordinary life for a woman born 100 years ago on a Frederick County farm -- and still works in the same vicinity."It doesn't seem believable -- imagine 100 years old," Miss Smith reflected the other day as she sat in the parlor of her 1870s-vintage home.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large | April 7, 1996
Spring will flower in earnest at the Johns Hopkins University during "Homewood in Flower: A Country House Spring."The neoclassical home of the Carroll family, now a museum on campus, will be decorated with cut-flower arrangements appropriate to the Federal period, using tulips, sea lavender, lilies and dozens of other flowers.Tours will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., April 11-13; noon to hTC p.m., April 14. A brown-bag lunch, lecture and demonstration, "Planning, Cultivating and Arranging Your Own Flowers, 101" is scheduled for April 12 at noon under the homecoming tent in the Freshman Quad.
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