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By Andrew Lam | April 21, 1997
"PLEASE, GRANDMA, blink, just blink, please," my mother says, but Grandma only smiles. Then she says, "Bye, bye," her wheelchair gleaming in the sunlight. "Bye, bye." It is all the English that she remembers."All right, Grandma," I say, taking over, "if blinking's too hard, try to nod. Nod, please, it's important. Very important."We hold our breaths and wait. Nothing. No blink, no nod. Only that constant beatific smile. My mother throws her hands up and sighs. "This is it. We are doomed."Grandma must learn to blink or nod her head at the right time.
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NEWS
Susan Reimer | December 11, 2013
Faithful readers of this column know that years ago, when my children were successfully out of diapers, we would send them for a week in the summer to their grandparents in Pittsburgh. It's not like my husband and I went to a Sandals resort during that week. He was usually traveling to cover the NFL, and I would use the week to go to work on my schedule instead of theirs. Joe and Jessie never asked to do anything while at Grandma and Grandpa's. No petting zoos. No carnivals. They would just lie in bed and watch cartoons on their own personal televisions, play and eat. Grandma would make piles of mashed potatoes and gravy for Joe, and there were ice cream sundaes for breakfast for Jessie.
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NEWS
By DANIEL S. GREENBERG | September 21, 1992
Washington. -- Scientists shuddered when Lyndon Johnson declared his interest in ''what science could do for grandma,'' and ordered his science adviser to point the nation's research enterprise toward the solution of domestic problems.Science, however, is a tradition-bound enterprise that's ingeniously resistant to external directions. It did not radically change course then or in response to similar commands from later presidents. But today, an important conceptual turnabout is occurring in the elite echelons of the scientific community, forced by the interplay of stringent budgets and the shrinking time gap between discoveries and products that embody them.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | August 7, 2013
Think of it as the graying of social media. Mom and dad - even the grandparents - are flocking to Facebook, and for the same reason the kids do. Connections. A report from the Pew Research Center found that 72 percent of adults who use the Internet also use social network sites, up from 67 percent just a year ago. It is still mostly young people; almost 90 percent of 18-to-29-year-olds use social media. But 60 percent of those ages 50 to 64 who use the Internet also use social media - double the percentage since the spring of 2009.
FEATURES
By Charlyne Varkonyi | August 14, 1991
Food is more to most of us than just taste. We eat a dish that reminds us of our past and suddenly we are magically transported to a romantic restaurant, the high school cafeteria or Grandma's kitchen.No dish transports me to my past better than Grandma's Paprikas Chicken. Way before I knew a saute from a satay, I remember watching Grandma at her old coal stove patiently producing what will always be my benchmark. No matter who has made the dish since -- from the best Hungarian restaurant to my mother -- no one has been able to equal Grandma's.
NEWS
By RICHARD REEVES | November 21, 1997
LOS ANGELES -- I have seen the future and it works, but not for Grandma. It is a two-page advertisement in living color spread across every magazine I saw last week. The advertiser is Hewlett-Packard, and the product it is pushing is called ''The HP PhotoSmart PC Photography System.''The system includes a digital camera and a printer, which with Microsoft's ''Picture It!'' software ''can adjust exposures, change colors, crop and manipulate images -- all as creativity dictates.'' The ad promises ''the first pictures of the future.
NEWS
By Amy P. Ingram and Amy P. Ingram,Contributing Writer | August 25, 1993
To the children, she's just Grandma Ethel. But others say the 73-year-old with 25 grandchildren is more than just a grandmother -- she's the "Dear Abby" for kids.Ethel Graves, part of a county social services program, has been giving advice to hundreds of children for about five years.Mrs. Graves volunteers her time each year to "Grandma Please," a program for latchkey kids. The project, copied from a similar initiative at Hull House in Chicago, allows children who stay home alone after school to call and talk with various "grandmas" from the area.
SPORTS
February 9, 2006
When Michael Huff was a younger football player growing up in Texas, he wanted his grandmother, Ida Terry, to come watch him play. Grandma wasn't so sure she wanted to brave the heat, the mosquitoes and the red ants. So the youngster made a promise. "If you go, I'll get you five touchdowns," he said. Huff did just that, and he went on to become an All-America defensive back for the University of Texas. On Tuesday, when he went to Oklahoma City to collect the Jim Thorpe Award as the nation's best defensive back, Huff brought his grandmother along.
NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER | August 15, 2004
THE MINUTE RUDY Mihoces proposed to Viola McDevitt, she quit. During more than 50 years of marriage, she never drew a paycheck again. But, for a woman who didn't work, Vi had a lot of jobs. She was the devoted daughter of Gertrude, a mother she lost too young and mourned all her life, and of Thomas, the father she cared for while black lung extinguished his life like a candle in a coal mine. She was a wife for more than half a century, until Rudy died eight years ago, and she dedicated her life to their four sons.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn and Katherine Dunn,SUN STAFF | April 16, 1997
St. Mary's has Grandma to thank for yesterday's upset of No. 1 Notre Dame Prep.Grandma, usually known as goalie Jen Corradini, made 17 saves, including two in the waning minutes, to preserve a 14-13 victory for the No. 5 Saints in an Association of Independent Schools A Division Lears League game at Weems Whelan Field in Annapolis.In the first meeting between the defending A Division champs and newcomer St. Mary's (9-2 overall, 3-0 league), the Pirates (5-1, 3-1) outshot the Saints, 31-19.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | January 24, 2010
Ida Mae Selenkow, a well-known wrestling star of the 1950s who later became a registered nurse and in recent years was known as the "yodeling Grandma from Baltimore," died Tuesday of complications from a stroke at Gilchrist Hospice Care. The longtime Pikesville resident was 78. Ida Marilyn St. Laurent was born in New London, Conn., and raised in North Stonington, Conn., where she lived with relatives after her mother abandoned her. She never knew her father. "Her mother hung out in bars, dating sailors, and abandoned her to her aunt's care after the first few months," wrote Wally Shugg, a retired University of Maryland, Baltimore County English professor, author and longtime friend.
NEWS
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,joseph.burris@baltsun.com | January 9, 2010
Pauline Harris loves a word for "grandmother" that traces back to her Polish heritage: "Busia" (pronounced BOO-shah). She heard it often while growing up in a mostly Polish section of Canton and looked forward to the day when her grandchildren would call her that. "But when my first grandson was born, he couldn't pronounce, 'Busia,' " said Harris, 52, who now resides in Federal Hill. "He started calling me, 'Becka.' " Close enough, she figured, as long as he doesn't call her "Grandma."
NEWS
August 20, 2009
On August 17, 2009, ALEGRINA "Ali" A. (nee Bono); beloved mother of Robert O. Wilhelm, Jr. and his wife the late Nancy J., John A. Wilhelm and his wife Chris, Deborah E. Liebel and her husband Eugene; loving grandma of Robert, Heather, Holly, Amber, Eugene III, Adrienne, and Nathan; loving great grandma of Erik, Nikko, David, Miranda, Eugene IV, and Benjamin. Relatives and friends are invited to call the SCHIMUNEK FUNERAL HOME of BEL AIR, 610 W. MacPhail Road (Route 24) on Thursday from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 PM, where services will be held at 11 AM on Friday, August 21. Interment private.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,Sun reporter | March 12, 2008
Wintry sunlight seeps into the storefront window, brightening the entryway and glinting off dozens of metallic canisters that, displayed behind the bar, hold dreamy-named versions of the elixir that is Teavolve's raison d'etre. Mandarin green. Lapsang souchong. Lemon mango. Rooibos paradise. Golden Jasmine. Sonari assam. Sundew. Deeper into the room, people sit across from one another absorbed in conversation, hands wrapped around warm mugs. Local art lines the walls and a soothing soundtrack that the owners accurately call "chill lounge" filters through unobtrusively.
BUSINESS
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | August 30, 2007
Most of us have a few relatives or friends who have never joined the wired world. Because of age, infirmity or lack of inclination, they haven't gotten around to buying a computer, or even learning to use one at the library or senior center. Eventually, however, they may tire of hearing friends talk about getting messages from their kids or photos of their grandchildren via e-mail. They think, "Wouldn't it be nice if I could do that?" And so, the desire to become just a little bit wired has created a niche market for a gadget I call the granny-mail machine, or GMM. The GMM is a single-purpose computer that handles e-mail only, over a dialup connection, and requires minimal technical skill on Grandma's part (I hereinafter incorporate into "Grandma" a generic reference to the unwired of all genders, ages and grandhood status)
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | June 20, 2007
I was happy to hear that Irish chefs are headed our way. Starting next Wednesday, a contingent of four Northern Ireland chefs will be cooking on the National Mall in Washington as part of the Smithsonian Folklife Festival. A makeshift pub will be set up to dispense food and drink. Until recently, this was not news that would excite me. I thought I knew Irish food. My grandmother was born in County Kerry and lived with us until I was a teenager. Every St. Patrick's Day, our house would fill with celebrants, many of them monsignors.
NEWS
By Gwen Schoen and Gwen Schoen,McClatchy-Tribune | March 7, 2007
Every Southern girl learns how to make baking-powder biscuits. You never question it. You just do it and accept the responsibility as part of your heritage. I was lucky. I learned to make biscuits from the best biscuit baker in Fayetteville, N.C. -- my grandma. She made them without fail every single day for Granddaddy's supper. My family and my cousin Mack's family lived just down the street from our grandparents. Mack and I figured out, at a very young age, that if we showed up at Grandma's just before supper, she would give each of us a hot biscuit right out of the oven.
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