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Grandfather Clause

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NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | October 3, 2003
As it debates strengthening the city's ethics laws, the Baltimore City Council is considering a grandfather clause that would allow six of its members to continue employing their adult children even as the council prohibits future lawmakers from hiring their own family members. After a hearing of the council's Judiciary and Legislative Investigations Committee last night in City Hall, City Council President Sheila Dixon said she favors the idea of a grandfather clause, which would prevent current council employees from losing their jobs.
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NEWS
January 26, 2010
In your editorial on the new storm water mandates ("Storm over storm water," Jan. 26), you say that "redevelopment efforts won't be affected immediately because existing projects are exempted under a grandfather clause." Unfortunately, that is inaccurate. Projects that are "in the pipeline" are not grandfathered. As anyone in the development community or local government can tell you, the only projects which are exempt from the new requirements are those which have already received final approvals -- which typically are obtained right before construction starts.
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NEWS
By TRB | March 12, 1992
California's Proposition 13 of 1978 was the start of the middle-class tax revolt that has dominated American politics ever since. Fourteen years later, the middle class tax burden is higher than ever. But a lucky few have done OK.That plotline was built into Prop 13 from the beginning. A voter initiative, it limited property tax to 1 percent of assessed value. It also rolled back assessments to 1975 levels. It limited increases to 2 percent a year. But -- and this ''but'' has now brought Prop 13 before the Supreme Court -- assessments rise to market value whenever a property changes hands.
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | February 19, 2006
Tuesday is the last home game of the season for the St. Maria Goretti's boys basketball team, the traditional time when seniors are honored for their service to the school and take one final bow before the faithful. If Gene Johnson gets applause, he'll accept it in street clothes, since he won't be suiting up against neighboring South Hagerstown, but not because of injury or through some fault of his own. Johnson is a fifth-year senior at Goretti, and he will be sitting in order to protect South Hagerstown from drawing sanctions for playing a team with a player deemed ineligible under Maryland Public Secondary Schools Athletic Association rules.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | October 7, 2003
Mayor Martin O'Malley and the city's law department have raised concerns about a proposal to strengthen the city's ethics laws, saying it may go too far by requiring an additional 435 midlevel city employees to file financial disclosure forms. The bill, called "Ethics: Raising the Bar," was drafted by the city's five-member Board of Ethics, which argues that the City Council needs to tighten its laws to bring it into line with state standards for ethical conduct. In addition to requiring 43 percent more city employees to disclose their financial interests on forms submitted to the board (1,017 are now required to do so)
NEWS
November 13, 1991
From: James M. HolwayEllicott CityThe proposed Howard County petition and referendum to limit Howard County Council terms to three terms and containing a grandfather clause does not serve a useful purpose and should be rejected unless modified.First of all, the problem is today, and the effective dateshould not be deferred until possibly your grandchildren are of age to run. In other words, if we are fulfilling a current public need, then there should not be a grandfather clause protecting the incumbents.
NEWS
By Glenn Small and Glenn Small,Evening Sun Staff | May 21, 1991
When the Wells McComas Citizens Improvement Association began its efforts to shut down an illegal junkyard in the North Point community of eastern Baltimore County, Lyndon B. Johnson was president.Twenty-seven years later, a Baltimore Circuit Court judge may have finally put an end to the dispute when he ordered the owner to clean up the mess and close the junkyard.The ruling of Judge James T. Smith Jr., rendered last week, was released yesterday. In his order, he gave Oscar Meyers, the junkyard's owner, 30 days to remove all the old cars, trucks and other rusting pieces of junk from his property in the 3800 block of North Point Blvd.
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | February 19, 2006
Tuesday is the last home game of the season for the St. Maria Goretti's boys basketball team, the traditional time when seniors are honored for their service to the school and take one final bow before the faithful. If Gene Johnson gets applause, he'll accept it in street clothes, since he won't be suiting up against neighboring South Hagerstown, but not because of injury or through some fault of his own. Johnson is a fifth-year senior at Goretti, and he will be sitting in order to protect South Hagerstown from drawing sanctions for playing a team with a player deemed ineligible under Maryland Public Secondary Schools Athletic Association rules.
NEWS
January 26, 2010
In your editorial on the new storm water mandates ("Storm over storm water," Jan. 26), you say that "redevelopment efforts won't be affected immediately because existing projects are exempted under a grandfather clause." Unfortunately, that is inaccurate. Projects that are "in the pipeline" are not grandfathered. As anyone in the development community or local government can tell you, the only projects which are exempt from the new requirements are those which have already received final approvals -- which typically are obtained right before construction starts.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | December 7, 1994
NEW YORK -- Ron comes to the city about twice a month from Maryland. He likes to go to the same topless bar downtown after dinner to unwind a little, he says, or less frequently, to a peep show on Eighth Avenue on his way back to his hotel.Part of the ritual is curiosity, he said. Another part is that he feels a little more daring in New York than when he's at home."Nothing wrong with it, and I think it's my own business," said Ron, a 43-year-old lawyer who declined to give his last name.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | October 7, 2003
Mayor Martin O'Malley and the city's law department have raised concerns about a proposal to strengthen the city's ethics laws, saying it may go too far by requiring an additional 435 midlevel city employees to file financial disclosure forms. The bill, called "Ethics: Raising the Bar," was drafted by the city's five-member Board of Ethics, which argues that the City Council needs to tighten its laws to bring it into line with state standards for ethical conduct. In addition to requiring 43 percent more city employees to disclose their financial interests on forms submitted to the board (1,017 are now required to do so)
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | October 3, 2003
As it debates strengthening the city's ethics laws, the Baltimore City Council is considering a grandfather clause that would allow six of its members to continue employing their adult children even as the council prohibits future lawmakers from hiring their own family members. After a hearing of the council's Judiciary and Legislative Investigations Committee last night in City Hall, City Council President Sheila Dixon said she favors the idea of a grandfather clause, which would prevent current council employees from losing their jobs.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | December 9, 1994
NEW YORK -- Ron comes to the city about twice a month from Maryland. He likes to go to the same topless bar downtown after dinner to unwind a little, he says, or less frequently, to a peep show on Eighth Avenue on his way back to his hotel.Part of the ritual is curiosity, he said. Another part is that he feels a little more daring in New York than when he's at home."Nothing wrong with it, and I think it's my own business," said Ron, a 43-year-old lawyer who declined to give his last name.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | December 7, 1994
NEW YORK -- Ron comes to the city about twice a month from Maryland. He likes to go to the same topless bar downtown after dinner to unwind a little, he says, or less frequently, to a peep show on Eighth Avenue on his way back to his hotel.Part of the ritual is curiosity, he said. Another part is that he feels a little more daring in New York than when he's at home."Nothing wrong with it, and I think it's my own business," said Ron, a 43-year-old lawyer who declined to give his last name.
NEWS
By TRB | March 12, 1992
California's Proposition 13 of 1978 was the start of the middle-class tax revolt that has dominated American politics ever since. Fourteen years later, the middle class tax burden is higher than ever. But a lucky few have done OK.That plotline was built into Prop 13 from the beginning. A voter initiative, it limited property tax to 1 percent of assessed value. It also rolled back assessments to 1975 levels. It limited increases to 2 percent a year. But -- and this ''but'' has now brought Prop 13 before the Supreme Court -- assessments rise to market value whenever a property changes hands.
NEWS
By BRUCE GOLDFARB | March 8, 1992
How could it happen? Why are questions about the safety of silicon breast implants coming to light now, after they have been used by more than a million women over the past 30 years?The simple explanation is that silicon breast implants were never required by the Food and Drug Administration to undergo rigorous scientific study before use in human patients.Silicon breast implants are one example of thousands of devices and materials routinely used in medicine that have never been subjected to mandatory safety testing.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | December 9, 1994
NEW YORK -- Ron comes to the city about twice a month from Maryland. He likes to go to the same topless bar downtown after dinner to unwind a little, he says, or less frequently, to a peep show on Eighth Avenue on his way back to his hotel.Part of the ritual is curiosity, he said. Another part is that he feels a little more daring in New York than when he's at home."Nothing wrong with it, and I think it's my own business," said Ron, a 43-year-old lawyer who declined to give his last name.
NEWS
By BRUCE GOLDFARB | March 8, 1992
How could it happen? Why are questions about the safety of silicon breast implants coming to light now, after they have been used by more than a million women over the past 30 years?The simple explanation is that silicon breast implants were never required by the Food and Drug Administration to undergo rigorous scientific study before use in human patients.Silicon breast implants are one example of thousands of devices and materials routinely used in medicine that have never been subjected to mandatory safety testing.
NEWS
November 13, 1991
From: James M. HolwayEllicott CityThe proposed Howard County petition and referendum to limit Howard County Council terms to three terms and containing a grandfather clause does not serve a useful purpose and should be rejected unless modified.First of all, the problem is today, and the effective dateshould not be deferred until possibly your grandchildren are of age to run. In other words, if we are fulfilling a current public need, then there should not be a grandfather clause protecting the incumbents.
NEWS
By Glenn Small and Glenn Small,Evening Sun Staff | May 21, 1991
When the Wells McComas Citizens Improvement Association began its efforts to shut down an illegal junkyard in the North Point community of eastern Baltimore County, Lyndon B. Johnson was president.Twenty-seven years later, a Baltimore Circuit Court judge may have finally put an end to the dispute when he ordered the owner to clean up the mess and close the junkyard.The ruling of Judge James T. Smith Jr., rendered last week, was released yesterday. In his order, he gave Oscar Meyers, the junkyard's owner, 30 days to remove all the old cars, trucks and other rusting pieces of junk from his property in the 3800 block of North Point Blvd.
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