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By Seth Boster, The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2013
Brandon Copeland knows he can't be his grandfather. If the 2009 Gilman graduate is to claim a spot as an undrafted rookie free agent on the Ravens' final 53-man roster at the end of the preseason, it can't be in the way Roy Hilton joined the Baltimore Colts as a defensive end in 1965. At least, not exactly. "Now I'm at a totally different position," Copeland said recently after practice at the Under Armour Performance Center, where the former Penn defensive end is trying out as a middle linebacker.
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By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2014
When M.P. Mariappan was born 95 years ago, England's King George V was emperor of India. Mahatma Gandhi hadn't yet taken up India's struggle for independence. Most Indians lived in small, scattered villages instead of in cities. Mariappan survived plague, the Great Depression, World War II and a 1,700-mile death trek from Burma, where he was living at the time, to his homeland. He became a respected fruit merchant who struggled to educate his eight children, boosting the family decisively from their lowly caste and into the middle class.
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NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | July 3, 2013
The Harford County Department of Emergency Services recently presented Jack Marshall Dempsey, 10, with a Gold 911 award in recognition of his prompt but ill-fated efforts to save the life of his grandfather. On the morning of April 1, Jack found his grandfather, Alfred "Ted" Marshall slumped in a chair. The boy immediately called 911 to report his grandfather's condition in an attempt to save his life. Unfortunately, Mr. Marshall had sustained a massive heart attack and later died at the hospital.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2014
A grandson of the Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Samuel Eliot Morison has been charged with stealing nearly three boxes of documents that his grandfather used to write a 15-volume history of World War II commissioned by President Franklin D. Roosevelt. Authorities found some of the documents when they raided the Crofton home of Samuel L. Morison in May, according to federal charges unsealed Tuesday. Others had been put up for sale. They had been missing for more than a year. Morison, 69, appeared briefly in court following his arrest Tuesday morning, according to the U.S. attorney's office.
NEWS
By ELIZABETH HEUBECK | May 10, 1996
MANY MEN measure their worth largely by their ability to produce -- for a nation, a company, a family, or for their own sustenance. My grandfather was one such man.When dementia forced him to give up his home and live with his daughter for whom he once provided, his pride was deeply wounded. Slipping in and out of the house from time to time for quick visits to my parents and grandfather, I was spellbound by the large man who attempted to make himself invisible in this house -- a house he had not built, bought by mortgage or maintained.
FEATURES
By Mike Royko and Mike Royko,Tribune Media Services | October 9, 1991
JUDGE THOMAS, a former assistant has said that you subjected her to sexual harassment. Would you please respond to these allegations.""Senator, I recall my grandfather once saying to me, 'Clarence,' -- you see he always called me Clarence, since that was my name -- he said, 'Clarence, why did you pull that girl's pigtails?' ""Excuse me, Judge, but I'm not sure I understand what you're talking about.""I was talking about my grandfather, a poor but proud man, of little formal education but great wisdom and insight into the human condition.
NEWS
By Pat Brodowski and Pat Brodowski,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 28, 1998
WHEN LOUIS LOUIS Vaughan, age 72, experienced kidney failure about four years ago, his son and daughter looked upon modern medicine, and lined up to be potential donors of a lifesaving kidney.But the configuration of their kidneys meant neither offspring could donate.Four years later, with her grandfather's health degrading while he depended upon dialysis, his granddaughter Diana Vaughan turned 18 -- the earliest age one can be a donor -- and tested ready and able to give. On Sept. 25, she gave a kidney to her grandfather.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2012
Outfielder L.J. Hoes is expected to be announced Tuesday as this year's winner of the Brooks Robinson Award for the best season by an Orioles minor league hitter. He won't be winning it alone, though, not in his mind anyway. "I really played this whole season for my grandfather. He has been sick this whole season," said the 22-year-old Hoes, who was the Orioles' third-round pick out of Mitchellville, Md., in 2008. "He passed away in August, and I played the whole season for him. " Charles E. Hoes , a retired bio-lab technician born in Germantown, died Aug. 16 at age 78 from ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig's disease.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston | February 22, 2001
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- Orioles second baseman Jerry Hairston knows the history and a lot of stories about the old Negro leagues. ...... And then there was the time when New York Yankees slugger Joe DiMaggio had already struck out twice against black pitcher Satchel Paige and upon entering the batter's box for the third time, he told Hairston's grandfather, Sam, a catcher with the Indianapolis Clowns and Birmingham Barons, that Paige was the best he...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2014
When M.P. Mariappan was born 95 years ago, England's King George V was emperor of India. Mahatma Gandhi hadn't yet taken up India's struggle for independence. Most Indians lived in small, scattered villages instead of in cities. Mariappan survived plague, the Great Depression, World War II and a 1,700-mile death trek from Burma, where he was living at the time, to his homeland. He became a respected fruit merchant who struggled to educate his eight children, boosting the family decisively from their lowly caste and into the middle class.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | January 3, 2014
For the second time in three days, Anne Arundel County police say a child was left alone in a cold vehicle at the Arundel Mills complex in Hanover. Police say a man left his 6-year-old grandson in the mall parking lot near Best Buy on Thursday as snow fell throughout the area. "This is a snow-covered car. This is a cold car. This is 34 degrees with a snowstorm at that point. It was only getting colder," said police spokesman Lt. T.J. Smith. The incident followed another case Tuesday in which a police say a Baltimore woman was arrested after she left her 4-year-old daughter alone in an SUV for 81/2 hours while she was inside Maryland Live casino at Arundel Mills.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2013
A 55-year-old Baltimore man has been indicted by a grand jury on charges of involuntary manslaughter after his 16-month-old granddaughter was found dead in a hot truck in mid-July, police said. The charges filed in Baltimore against Anthony Jerome Towles come more than three months after the body of Sabriya Towles was discovered in her grandfather's truck in Lansdowne. The medical examiner ruled at the time that her death was accidental and the result of hyperthermia, the medical term for excessively high body temperatures.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2013
The momentous events that culminated in the March on Washington 50 years ago this week have largely overlooked the legacy of one man whose own dream of such a march was more than two decades in the making. Asa Philip Randolph — better known as A. Philip Randolph — went from being described as "the most dangerous Negro in America" for his work organizing the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters to being recognized as the grandfather of civil rights. "No other living American has done more to seek justice for all the poor, the working classes, the minorities in our society and around the world than has A. Philip Randolph," said civil rights leader Bayard Rustin, who was a protege of Randolph's and did much of the planning for the 1963 March on Washington.
SPORTS
By Seth Boster, The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2013
Brandon Copeland knows he can't be his grandfather. If the 2009 Gilman graduate is to claim a spot as an undrafted rookie free agent on the Ravens' final 53-man roster at the end of the preseason, it can't be in the way Roy Hilton joined the Baltimore Colts as a defensive end in 1965. At least, not exactly. "Now I'm at a totally different position," Copeland said recently after practice at the Under Armour Performance Center, where the former Penn defensive end is trying out as a middle linebacker.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | July 3, 2013
The Harford County Department of Emergency Services recently presented Jack Marshall Dempsey, 10, with a Gold 911 award in recognition of his prompt but ill-fated efforts to save the life of his grandfather. On the morning of April 1, Jack found his grandfather, Alfred "Ted" Marshall slumped in a chair. The boy immediately called 911 to report his grandfather's condition in an attempt to save his life. Unfortunately, Mr. Marshall had sustained a massive heart attack and later died at the hospital.
MOBILE
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2013
With just six days left in the General Assembly session, a House of Delegates committee is expected to vote Wednesday on a bill that would increase oversight of speed camera programs in Maryland, tighten rules on camera placement and more clearly bar government contracts that pay vendors on a per-ticket basis. But the legislation, drafted after The Baltimore Sun documented a range of problems in the city's program, would not require governments to put precise time stamps on their citation photos - a necessity for motorists to be able to verify their tickets, according to experts.
NEWS
By James Bock and Gregory P. Kane and James Bock and Gregory P. Kane,Staff Writers | October 4, 1993
A 28-year-old Washington County man beat his 78-year-old grandfather to death early yesterday before being killed with a shotgun blast by his uncle, authorities said.Daniel Addison Ingram Jr. -- who authorities said had a history of mental illness -- went on a rampage in his relatives' Colonial Park neighborhood outside Hagerstown about 2:30 a.m.Mr. Ingram arrived "screaming and yelling" at his grandparents' home on Harvard Road about 2:30 a.m. and, once inside, began tearing up the house and threatening his grandfather, Elbert Barron, said Dr. Edward W. Ditto III, deputy county medical examiner.
FEATURES
September 20, 1990
The incident seems right off of today's headlines: An American president decides to land troops in the Middle East in part because an adviser warns that Iraq has designs on "reclaiming" land considered its own, Kuwait.The year, however, was 1958 and the president was Dwight D. Eisenhower.His bold and prescient move, which sought to prevent what Iraq finally got around to doing last month, may seem surprising to those whose image of him is as the president who golfed his way through the politically pale 1950s.
SPORTS
By Glenn Graham, The Baltimore Sun | December 11, 2012
With under three minutes to play in the third quarter and his team managing a slim lead against No. 1 Mount St. Joseph, Archbishop Spalding boys basketball coach Derrick Lewis saw something he didn't like and promptly called timeout. In the huddle, he challenged his players with a simple question: "Are you guys scared to win this game?" he asked. The No. 8 Cavaliers' response was an impressive one. Along with diving for loose balls and grabbing tough rebounds — the little things Lewis wanted to see — Spalding got an inspiring second-half shooting performance from guard Jourdan Grant to pull off a stunning 81-71 home win Tuesday night in Severn.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2012
Outfielder L.J. Hoes is expected to be announced Tuesday as this year's winner of the Brooks Robinson Award for the best season by an Orioles minor league hitter. He won't be winning it alone, though, not in his mind anyway. "I really played this whole season for my grandfather. He has been sick this whole season," said the 22-year-old Hoes, who was the Orioles' third-round pick out of Mitchellville, Md., in 2008. "He passed away in August, and I played the whole season for him. " Charles E. Hoes , a retired bio-lab technician born in Germantown, died Aug. 16 at age 78 from ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig's disease.
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