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By KEVIN COWHERD | July 27, 2006
This is the story of a recent family vacation in Arizona and California, which involved, among other things: record heat, rip-off gas prices, nearly being bounced from the Hearst Castle and a near-death experience at the Grand Canyon. OK, I say "near-death experience." But that was just to keep you reading. Let's face it, there's no better way to clear a room than by pulling out a stack of photos and saying: "Who wants to hear about our summer vacation?" So sometimes you need a hook.
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The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2012
Could you imagine Bill Murray stopping by your Baltimore pad, carrying a "bottle of whine [sic] or vegetable tray"? Oh, to dream. The humor site Super Official News announced that the actor is to embark on a six-week Party Crashing Tour, scheduled to lift off Aug. 1 in Phoenix, Ariz., with a Baltimore stop on Aug. 26. Bill Murray has, in truth, not announced a grand tour. But don't let reality rob your of your hopes of entertaining the star of "Caddyshack," "Ghostbusters," "Groundhog Day" or "Lost in Translation.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,SUN STAFF | February 25, 1999
Frederick Douglass will be hanging out in Fells Point. Harriet Tubman will talk about her pivotal role in the Underground Railroad. North Pole explorer Matthew Henson will chill you with tales of the arctic.These notable figures from African-American history will be re-created by character actors for the third African-American Renaissance Grand Tour."This is such a mammoth task," says Thomas L. Saunders, co-producer for the four-hour tour. "We bring everything to life. Including the musicians, it takes about 150 people to get this together."
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | July 27, 2006
This is the story of a recent family vacation in Arizona and California, which involved, among other things: record heat, rip-off gas prices, nearly being bounced from the Hearst Castle and a near-death experience at the Grand Canyon. OK, I say "near-death experience." But that was just to keep you reading. Let's face it, there's no better way to clear a room than by pulling out a stack of photos and saying: "Who wants to hear about our summer vacation?" So sometimes you need a hook.
FEATURES
The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2012
Could you imagine Bill Murray stopping by your Baltimore pad, carrying a "bottle of whine [sic] or vegetable tray"? Oh, to dream. The humor site Super Official News announced that the actor is to embark on a six-week Party Crashing Tour, scheduled to lift off Aug. 1 in Phoenix, Ariz., with a Baltimore stop on Aug. 26. Bill Murray has, in truth, not announced a grand tour. But don't let reality rob your of your hopes of entertaining the star of "Caddyshack," "Ghostbusters," "Groundhog Day" or "Lost in Translation.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Sun Staff | April 16, 2000
They've traipsed across Bucknell, wandered the halls of Gettysburg, hiked around Saint Joseph's and driven past Dickinson. If it's Friday, this must be Loyola -- as in Loyola College in Baltimore. Having driven six hours from their home in Manchester, Conn., Barbara Bosch and her 16-year-old daughter, Joanna, are walking around their sixth college campus. Just another half-dozen or so more to go. Like hundreds of thousands of their counterparts across the country, the Bosches are scouting for prospective colleges this spring.
FEATURES
January 7, 1994
Here are selected nominations for the 36th annual Grammy Awards:* Record of the Year: "A Whole New World (Aladdin's Theme)," Peabo Bryson and Regina Belle, producer Walter Afanasieff; "I Will Always Love You," Whitney Houston, producer David Foster; "The River of Dreams," Billy Joel, producers Dan Kortchmar and Joe Nicolo; "If I Ever Lose My Faith in You," Sting, producers Hugh Padgham and Sting; "Harvest Moon," Neil Young, producers Neil Young and Ben...
SPORTS
By Tom Higgins and Tom Higgins,Charlotte Observer | April 13, 1993
CHARLOTTE, N.C. -- Jimmy Hensley doesn't recall talking very much with Alan Kulwicki."Every time I saw Alan, especially at race tracks, he appeared to be concentrating so hard and was so deep in thought that I didn't want to bother him. . . I didn't want to interrupt," Hensley said. "We would just speak and that was about it. We were friendly, but we never stood around and had what you would call a long conversation."Yet, it was Hensley, 47, a fellow driver Kulwicki seemingly hardly knew, whom the Winston Cup champion personally picked within the past month to fill in for him "if something ever happened."
TRAVEL
By Jane Engle and By Jane Engle,Special to the Sun | August 25, 2002
As a member of an escorted tour, you don't even have to know the Matterhorn isn't a tuba," the late Temple Fielding, father of the Fielding guides, once wrote. That still may be true, but today's traveler can ill afford to be ignorant. I'm referring, of course, to deciphering a tour brochure. Knowing what's offered -- and what's not -- can mean the difference between taking a grand European tour or a disappointing one. A good travel agent should be adept at decoding the lingo. But if you are booking on the Web or directly with a tour operator, you may need help.
NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | June 30, 1999
Thomas L. Saunders has always had a knack for drawing crowds to his productions, but in Baltimore's booming tourist industry he is still the little kid on the block.In May, his home-based African-American Grand Renaissance tour was nominated for the Baltimore Academy of Travel, Tourism and Hospitality's "Attraction Professional of the Year" award along with the Maryland Science Center, ESPN Sports Zone, the National Aquarium and Port Discovery. He lost to the science center's IMAX theater.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Sun Staff | April 16, 2000
They've traipsed across Bucknell, wandered the halls of Gettysburg, hiked around Saint Joseph's and driven past Dickinson. If it's Friday, this must be Loyola -- as in Loyola College in Baltimore. Having driven six hours from their home in Manchester, Conn., Barbara Bosch and her 16-year-old daughter, Joanna, are walking around their sixth college campus. Just another half-dozen or so more to go. Like hundreds of thousands of their counterparts across the country, the Bosches are scouting for prospective colleges this spring.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,SUN STAFF | February 25, 1999
Frederick Douglass will be hanging out in Fells Point. Harriet Tubman will talk about her pivotal role in the Underground Railroad. North Pole explorer Matthew Henson will chill you with tales of the arctic.These notable figures from African-American history will be re-created by character actors for the third African-American Renaissance Grand Tour."This is such a mammoth task," says Thomas L. Saunders, co-producer for the four-hour tour. "We bring everything to life. Including the musicians, it takes about 150 people to get this together."
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | February 28, 1996
At least at this year's Grammys, neither A Taste of Honey nor Milli Vanilli is up for anything.* "Ellen" (8 p.m.-8:30 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- Ellen has no problem accepting a marriage proposal from Matt (Dan Gauthier) but thinks the ring is a bit on the small side. ABC.* "Grammy Awards" (8 p.m.-whenever, WJZ, Channel 13) -- Ellen DeGeneres is the host for this year's annual attempt by the music industry to show it knows what talent is. Past years have often proved more embarrassing than not, but this year the Grammy folks swear they'll get it right.
NEWS
By JANET HELLER | January 22, 1991
My house has been for sale longer than it takes to produce a baby. At 85, it is a bit shabby at the edges but the rooms are spacious, the two fireplaces work and the garden is lovely.''It is charming,'' prospective buyers exclaim, ''but so old-fashioned.'' What do they expect of a house built when Theodore Roosevelt was president? Mind you, they are not talking about a shack that lacks indoor plumbing, electricity, or central heating, but about a dignified residence built in 1906 which is long on character but short on what some people consider essential conveniences.
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