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NEWS
February 17, 2011
It's been called the world's most extravagant art, and for good reason: The combination of lavish sets, virtuoso orchestral playing and world-class vocal talent that go into a grand opera production has never come cheap. It takes money to make opera magic, and the lack of it was the main reason for the abrupt demise of the old Baltimore Opera Company in late 2009, after years of struggling to make ends meet despite a string of artistic successes. In its final season, spiraling production costs and other expenses had reached the point where the board had no choice but to declare bankruptcy and liquidate the company's assets at auction.
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NEWS
February 17, 2011
It's been called the world's most extravagant art, and for good reason: The combination of lavish sets, virtuoso orchestral playing and world-class vocal talent that go into a grand opera production has never come cheap. It takes money to make opera magic, and the lack of it was the main reason for the abrupt demise of the old Baltimore Opera Company in late 2009, after years of struggling to make ends meet despite a string of artistic successes. In its final season, spiraling production costs and other expenses had reached the point where the board had no choice but to declare bankruptcy and liquidate the company's assets at auction.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2011
When Ron Griffin received a solicitation for Lyric Opera Baltimore a few weeks ago, he had some questions. The organization sounded a lot like the Baltimore Opera Company, which folded midseason in 2009 because of financial problems, leaving Griffin and many others holding worthless tickets. "It was an abrupt end, and it wasn't handled well," said Griffin, a property manager. He and his partner were subscribers and patrons of the old company for more than a dozen years. "I asked what kinds of changes had been made.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2011
When Ron Griffin received a solicitation for Lyric Opera Baltimore a few weeks ago, he had some questions. The organization sounded a lot like the Baltimore Opera Company, which folded midseason in 2009 because of financial problems, leaving Griffin and many others holding worthless tickets. "It was an abrupt end, and it wasn't handled well," said Griffin, a property manager. He and his partner were subscribers and patrons of the old company for more than a dozen years. "I asked what kinds of changes had been made.
FEATURES
By Eric Siegel | September 22, 1991
BMA to offer a course on African artA three-session course on African art begins Thursday at the Baltimore Museum of Art.The course, "African Ways," is being held in conjunction with "Gold of Africa: Jewelry and Ornaments from Ghana, Cote d'Ivoire, Mali and Senegal," an exhibit of 200 objects dating back to the 17th century now open at the BMA.The course, which continues Oct. 3 and 10, examines the traditions of African art, its materials and techniques and...
FEATURES
By SYLVIA BADGER | July 9, 1995
Remember the line in "Amadeus" when the emperor told Mozart he had too many notes in his music? It was the favorite line of the movie for Carol Jean and Jay Young, who remembered it when they built their dream house and called it "Too Many Notes."It is a most appropriate name for the home of these two, who are busy working on the Grand Opera Ball this summer. (She's chairing the ball, and he's the opera company's chairman of the board.) I attended a party at their home in northern Baltimore County recently to kick off work on the ball, scheduled for Nov. 4. There certainly was an upbeat mood when Ms. Young announced that enough tables had been sold so far to net $42,000 for the Baltimore Opera Company, a good start toward the $150,000 goal.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey | November 22, 1992
'Landscape without horizons'Nefeli Massia's paintings, on view at Nye Gomez Gallery, have been described as "a kind of landscape without horizons or specific boundaries and a dense atmosphere populated with nightmarish presences." A Greek painter who has lived in the United States for five years and in Baltimore for the past year and a half, her work is said to combine elements of the Byzantine, the surreal and the metaphysical.Educated in Greece and America, Massia has degrees in both mathematics and art. She has won awards in this country, Greece, Bulgaria and Liechtenstein.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 30, 2000
"Messiah" took an astoundingly short time to compose: only 24 days. It defines the music of Christmas sine qua non, yet most of the work depicts the death and resurrection of Jesus, not the circumstances of his birth. While it is unquestionably one of the most popular pieces of choral music ever written, it comes in no single, definitive version. The composer touched it up so many times that modern interpreters of the work are presented with a vast array of performance options to consider.
ENTERTAINMENT
By [ANDREA GROSSMAN] | October 4, 2007
CRAFTS SUGARLOAF RETURNS Catch the 31st annual Sugarloaf Craft Festival at the Maryland State Fairgrounds tomorrow through Sunday. The festival will feature more than 350 artists with specialties from jewelry to clothing to pottery. Attendees can also watch craft demonstrations, including glassblowing, iron forging, wool spinning and metal spinning. There will be daily performances from Middle-earth Studios, a children's dress-up theater show; food from various vendors; and an area for purchasing prepackaged food such as soup and jams.
NEWS
September 4, 1994
If Richard Nixon's policy toward China was grist for grand opera, Bill Clinton's gyrations could be the stuff of musical comedy. The latest scene featured America's chief official huckster and secretary of Commerce, Ron Brown, who took along 24 Fortune 500 CEOs on a trade mission in which his much-touted "commercial diplomacy" netted contracts estimated at $6 billion.Let's make it clear that we approve of these efforts to make China (in Mr. Brown's words) "a commercial ally and partner," though his attempt to play the "Energizer bunny" was a bit excessive.
ENTERTAINMENT
By [ANDREA GROSSMAN] | October 4, 2007
CRAFTS SUGARLOAF RETURNS Catch the 31st annual Sugarloaf Craft Festival at the Maryland State Fairgrounds tomorrow through Sunday. The festival will feature more than 350 artists with specialties from jewelry to clothing to pottery. Attendees can also watch craft demonstrations, including glassblowing, iron forging, wool spinning and metal spinning. There will be daily performances from Middle-earth Studios, a children's dress-up theater show; food from various vendors; and an area for purchasing prepackaged food such as soup and jams.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | December 23, 2006
I've never met Joe and Peggy Werner, but I endorse their suggestion that a memorable Christmas Eve could be spent in church along Baltimore's Charles Street corridor. They recommended starting early, dropping in here and there, and breaking for dinner. Joe recalled a Christmas Eve experience at SS. Philip and James Roman Catholic Church in Charles Village where gowned hostesses acting as ushers invited him to a post-midnight parish reception.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 27, 2005
HOUSTON - Deep in the heart of a very red state, Houston Grand Opera has just wrapped up a production with so much sexual innuendo and anti-war sentiment that it might have warranted a look by the Justice Department. But even today's most rabid, neo-Legion of Decency types would probably have found themselves savoring Mark Adamo's new opera, Lysistrata, freely adapted from the ancient satire by Aristophanes about Athenian and Spartan women using the ultimate weapon to stop continual wars between their men. This clever, assured work marks two milestones.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | January 14, 2003
The weekend's musical lineup included accomplished vocalism, promising pianism and violin-ism (you're right, that's not a word), as well as a spirited, grass-roots opera production. On Friday night, pianist HouFei Yang, winner of the 2002 Yale Gordon Concerto Competition at the Peabody Institute, gave a recital for the Music in the Great Hall series at Towson Unitarian Universalist Church. Actually, half a recital. She switched to collaborative status for the second half, accompanying violinist Tao-Change Yu. On the solo side, HouFei made the strongest impression in the multi-colored Scarbo from Ravel's Gaspard de la nuit.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 29, 2001
In America, the Thanksgiving holiday marks the unofficial beginning of the Christmas season. But for music lovers, the Yuletide spirit doesn't manifest itself until the strains of Messiah, Georg Frederick Handel's oratorio supreme, begin wafting into the December air. "He is the master of us all," said Franz Joseph Haydn on hearing the celestial "Hallelujah Chorus" for the first time. "Handel understands effect better than any of us," echoed an effusive Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. "When he chooses, he strikes like a thunderbolt."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | October 14, 2001
In 1997, on the 68th anniversary of the St. Valentine's Day massacre, I witnessed the beginnings of the intricate process that has brought America's great mob epic to DVD this month with the lofty claim, "The reason they invented DVD!" Before the movie's 25th anniversary reissue, Francis Ford Coppola's longtime sound expert Walter Murch remastered the soundtrack for six-channel stereo, and I happened to be in the audience when Coppola heard it that way for the first time. Credited as "post production consultant" (i.e.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 2, 1999
Zeppelins have been out of use ever since the Hindenburg blew itself and many of its passengers to kingdom come in 1937. But it would be interesting to see -- even to take a short flight in -- one of those outmoded airships.It is in that spirit that one recommends the Washington Opera's staging of Massenet's "Le Cid" -- which opened Saturday night at the Kennedy Center Opera House and which the company calls the first staged production since 1902. This is a spare-no-expense, blow-your-socks-off production of a once-popular opera in a long-obsolete genre, French grand opera.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 29, 2001
In America, the Thanksgiving holiday marks the unofficial beginning of the Christmas season. But for music lovers, the Yuletide spirit doesn't manifest itself until the strains of Messiah, Georg Frederick Handel's oratorio supreme, begin wafting into the December air. "He is the master of us all," said Franz Joseph Haydn on hearing the celestial "Hallelujah Chorus" for the first time. "Handel understands effect better than any of us," echoed an effusive Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. "When he chooses, he strikes like a thunderbolt."
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 30, 2000
"Messiah" took an astoundingly short time to compose: only 24 days. It defines the music of Christmas sine qua non, yet most of the work depicts the death and resurrection of Jesus, not the circumstances of his birth. While it is unquestionably one of the most popular pieces of choral music ever written, it comes in no single, definitive version. The composer touched it up so many times that modern interpreters of the work are presented with a vast array of performance options to consider.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 2, 1999
Zeppelins have been out of use ever since the Hindenburg blew itself and many of its passengers to kingdom come in 1937. But it would be interesting to see -- even to take a short flight in -- one of those outmoded airships.It is in that spirit that one recommends the Washington Opera's staging of Massenet's "Le Cid" -- which opened Saturday night at the Kennedy Center Opera House and which the company calls the first staged production since 1902. This is a spare-no-expense, blow-your-socks-off production of a once-popular opera in a long-obsolete genre, French grand opera.
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