Advertisement
HomeCollectionsGrand National
IN THE NEWS

Grand National

SPORTS
By Joe Clancy Jr. and Joe Clancy Jr.,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 18, 1999
Call Welter Weight the Utah Jazz of steeplechase racing. Despite running what would have been winning races in other years, he's been second in back-to-back Maryland Hunt Cups behind superb efforts from Buck Jakes (1997) and Florida Law (1998). At least Michael Jordan left him alone.Just like the 1999 NBA season may finally be the year for Karl Malone and company, Welter Weight served notice he was ready for the Hunt Cup with a convincing win in yesterday's $30,000 Grand National timber stakes in Butler.
Advertisement
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | April 21, 1996
Joe Gillet is hot.After 17 years of riding, he never had scored a victory in Maryland's Triple Crown of steeplechasing -- until this year. Now he has two in a row.The popular jockey bided his time by tracking Maryland Hunt Cup champion Buck Jakes yesterday, then moved boldly to the front with Welter Weight and held off fast-closing Florida Law to capture the 94th running of the Grand National at Butler."
NEWS
April 10, 1997
THE IRA bombing and bomb hoax campaign will be a continuing nuisance through the British election on May 1. The probability is that a Labor government under Tony Blair will be elected with a policy on Northern Ireland identical to that of the Conservative government of Prime Minister John Major. Then there will be a chance of restarting the peace process.Since most acts of terrorism are publicity stunts, the bomb scare that postponed the 150th running of the Grand National steeplechase was a success.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | April 22, 2001
The 99th annual Grand National Steeplechase was a showcase for the old guys yesterday. There in the stretch was the venerable Welter Weight, 13 years old and still running strong, striving mightily to hold off the late burst of Southwoods, one year his senior. Astride Welter Weight was 50-year-old jockey A. Patrick Smithwick Jr., who won his first race over the Grand National course in 1968, retired from jumping in the '70s and returned because of his friendship with trainer Tom Voss and his affection for Welter Weight and the now-deceased Florida Law, both of whom he hunted with on Voss' farm.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,Special to The Sun | April 19, 2008
When Coal Dust was a youngster of 3, flat trainer Jimmy Murphy recommended that he be shifted to jumping, an unusual suggestion for a horse of that age. He even thought the horse could someday win the Maryland Hunt Cup. "Jimmy rode jumpers, so he knows what they look like," said Thomas Voss, who accepted his friend's view and converted Coal Dust into a steeplechaser. "On the flat, the horse was just a big, old rambling thing, and Jimmy thought he could be a pretty good timber horse. He did me a favor."
SPORTS
by Kent Baker, Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2011
The state's historic steeplechase season gets underway in earnest Saturday with the 101st edition of My Lady's Manor launching three consecutive weekends of major spring action. Feature purses begin with $35,000 for the big race at My Lady's Manor and conclude with a $75,000 offering at the Maryland Hunt Cup in Glyndon on April 30. While Tom Voss of Monkton (who has taken the early lead in the National Steeplechase Association trainer standings with three victories) campaigns at another meet near Atlanta, familiar top-flight local conditioners like Jack Fisher, William Meister, Ricky Hendriks, Katherine McKenna and Sanna Hendriks will have horses entered on the three-race Maryland card over timber.
SPORTS
By KENT BAKER and KENT BAKER,SUN REPORTER | April 22, 2006
His great-grandfather, Redmond Stewart, was one of the founders of the prestigious Maryland Hunt Cup. His grandfather built the property on which today's 104th Grand National Steeplechase will be conducted. His father, Charlie Fenwick Jr., has been a prominent rider and trainer in jumping circles for decades. So, steeplechasing is clearly ingrained in the blood of Charlie Fenwick III, who is scheduled to ride Askim while defending the jockey title in today's feature at Butler. The younger Fenwick will be aboard for his mother, Ann D. Stewart, who trains Askim, and competing against his father, who trains Make Your Own, during the 3 1/4 -mile test over timber fences that will be the final tuneup for the Hunt Cup next weekend.
FEATURES
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,SUN STAFF | April 21, 2001
Whirring quietly, the wheelchair glides over the stable straw and stops at a familiar stall. There, a bay stallion lifts his head, sniffs and nickers approvingly. His jockey has come home, to the family farm near Glyndon. "Come here, big guy," Irvin Naylor says, parking beside the racehorse, a jumper named Uncle Uno. Naylor strokes the animal with his left hand, now permanently clenched. Nuzzling him back, Uncle Uno inadvertently flips a switch on the wheelchair, sending Naylor lurching forward.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | April 20, 2003
The weather couldn't have been better. Although a whopping 12 horses started, the race was run free of incidents and everyone came back unscathed. The crowd - eager to get out after a nasty winter - was estimated at nearly 10,000. All that said, the story of the 101st running of the Grand National Steeplechase yesterday in Butler was Narrow River and the Robertson family of Unionville, Pa. "I don't know if I can articulate in an interview," said winning jockey Alexandra Robertson after guiding Narrow River to a narrow victory over a quickly closing Wood Whistle and Blair Waterman.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | April 20, 2012
Each April, I look forward to the Saturday when the Grand National Steeplechase jockeys ride across a swath of unspoiled Baltimore County valley. From a vantage point atop a hill off Butler Road, just off Falls Road, I look out across the Western Run Valley and think how fortunate we are to have this setting — and the chance to visit it on a single spring afternoon. That's enough; too much traffic is not what this location needs. The countryside race, held Saturday, is over private estates and farms.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.