Advertisement
HomeCollectionsGrand National
IN THE NEWS

Grand National

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord | April 20, 1991
Big Conoy makes his sixth trip over the Grand National Point-to-Point course at Butler today, but it could be his last.He is expected to race again, but probably not over the course that has been the scene of his greatest success.At age 15, the chestnut gelding can still jump the big fences, but I don't think he's got much speed left," said his trainer, Patty Fenwick. "We're relying on his experience."Most racehorses have died or been turned out to pasture by age 15.When Big Conoy won the Grand National last year, he was the oldest steeplechaser in the country to win a race sanctioned by the National Steeplechase and Hunt Association.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By Nelson Coffin, For The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2014
Jody Petty said he could not bear to look as he rode Guts For Garters across the finish line in the 118th Maryland Hunt Cup on Saturday afternoon in sunny Glyndon. The Elkton resident said he knew the outcome would be too close to call, considering Imperial Way, guided by Bethany Baumgardner, was practically matching Guts For Garters stride for stride as they thundered down the stretch in the $75,000 steeplechase race. "I closed my eyes and didn't look up until I was well past the finish line," Petty said.
Advertisement
SPORTS
By Kent Baker, Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 20, 2012
At age 48, Billy Meister has covered the entire course of the Maryland steeplechase scene, starting even before he was born. "My mother had two falls [while riding] with me when she was pregnant. " he said, chuckling at the thought. Meister competed in a pony race at age 7 and began taking timber fences at 12. Seven years later, he launched a training career, and five years after that went on his own as a conditioner of jumpers. He has trained for virtually the entire gamut of owners who run in the state and is known as a highly capable, sometimes fearless, jockey.
SPORTS
By Nelson Coffin, Baltimore Sun Media Group and By Nelson Coffin, Baltimore Sun Media Group | April 25, 2014
There are several reasons that, according to at least one assessment, 2013 timber champion Foyle has been installed as the favorite heading into the 118th running of the Maryland Hunt Cup on Saturday in Glyndon. Gates open at 11 a.m. for a 4 pm. post time for the $75,000 steeplechase race, which will run on what is generally regarded as one of the most daunting courses in the sport. For one thing, Foyle will have a new mount. Highly regarded British amateur rider Sam Waley-Cohen replaces James Slater, who guided the Merriefield Farm 9-year-old to a photo finish in the $30,000 Grand National last weekend in Butler, losing by a nose to Spencer Road.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | April 21, 2001
The Tom Voss-trained entry of Welter Weight and Sam Sullivan will be the horses to beat today in the $30,000 Grand National Steeplechase at Butler. Defending Grand National champion Welter Weight, a model of consistency, and Sam Sullivan finished 1-2 two weeks ago in the Elkridge-Harford point-to-point feature at Voss' farm and will not have to contend with 2000 Maryland Hunt Cup winner Swayo, who is sidelined by an injury. Nine entries are scheduled to vie in today's race, a three-mile test over timber fences beginning at 3:30 p.m. However, five of those are cross-entered in the secondary feature, the $15,000 Benjamin H. Murray Memorial, and some are likely to be scratched from the Grand National.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Staff Writer | April 18, 1992
Joe's O.K., reunited with his regular jockey, Johnny Bosley, faces undefeated Revelstoke today in the 90th running of the Grand National Point-to-Point at Butler.Last year Sanna Neilson won the Virginia Gold Cup with Joe's O.K. after Bosley was injured in a spill at the Marlborough Hunt Races. The horse, who was 1990 Timber Horse of the Year under Bosley, makes his first start in the Grand National for trainer Alicia Murphy and owner Oliver Keelan.Revelstoke has been raced sparingly over a three-year period, but has won four timber races -- at Cheshire (Pa.)
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | April 20, 1997
A home-course advantage, a confident ride and some bad racing luck contributed to two victories at Butler yesterday that provide a welcome harbinger for this week's Maryland Hunt Cup.Buck Jakes profited from the first two elements and scored by a neck over defending champion Welter Weight in the 95th annual Grand National Steeplechase.And Florida Law, scratched from the Grand National, benefited immensely when Pargale fell at the next-to-last fence and took the 32nd running of the Benjamin H. Murray Memorial.
SPORTS
By Wendy E. Lane and Wendy E. Lane,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 24, 2005
Charles Fenwick III got the ride on Rosbrian just two days before yesterday's 103rd Grand National steeplechase in Butler, and more good fortune came his way during the race when the front-runner fell at the final fence. Rosbrian, an Irish-bred gelding, took command of the 3 1/4 -mile test when Bruno Castelli, who had led all the way, hit the top rail of the 18th and last fence with his front hooves and tumbled to the ground. Rosbrian surged past Bug River to win by a head. "I said I would stick near Bug River and go when he goes," Fenwick said.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | April 17, 1999
This time it is the rider, not the horse, who has come back from adversity.Before the Grand National Steeplechase last spring, the defending champion, Buck Jakes, was returning from an untidy stint in England where he apparently wasn't happy. There was a question about how well he would run at Butler.The answer was authoritative when Buck Jakes won over what ranks as his home course for the second straight year.Now, the other half of the team, Anne Moran, has returned to the saddle after suffering three nondisplaced fractures in her lower back during a training accident last autumn.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,Sun reporter | April 22, 2007
Bubble Economy and jockey Diana Gillam continued a productive spring with a victory in the 105th Maryland Grand National in Butler yesterday. Now Bubble Economy is going to get a well-deserved weekend off. The Maryland Amateur Timber Association has put up a $30,000 bonus to a horse that can double in the $30,000 Grand National and next Saturday's Hunt Cup, but Andre Brewster, Bubble Economy's owner, expressed no interest in running the 8-year-old there....
SPORTS
By Nelson Coffin and For The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2014
The three owners of Spencer Road stood calmly together Saturday, discussing the outcome of the 112th Grand National Steeplechase in Butler on a mild and sunny afternoon after their horse was involved in a photo finish. The wait to determine that Spencer Road had, indeed, prevailed was long, but owners Gerry L. Brewster, Eleanor Russell and Joseph Tydings maintained their composure until the good news reached them. They smiled and hugged one another as they made their way to receive the coveted Grand National Challenge Cup with jockey Eric Poretz.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker, For The Baltimore Sun | April 20, 2013
The day couldn't have turned out better for owner Irv Naylor. And it wasn't too shabby for jockey James Slater, either. With Slater in the saddle, Naylor's Alfa Beat captured the 111th running of the Grand National Steeplechase in Butler, adding a punctuation mark to a four-win performance at the Middleburg (Va.) Spring Races that shot Naylor into the national lead among owners in purses won. All four Naylor horses who prevailed in Virginia were trained by Slater's wife, Brianne.
SPORTS
By Rich Scherr, Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 28, 2012
One by one, the favorites in Saturday's 116th Maryland Hunt Cup steeplechase fell by the wayside. First, defending champion Private Attack failed to clear the 13th fence. Then, four fences later, And The Eagle Flys, the winner of last week's Grand National, suffered a similar fate. In a $75,000 race that 12 horses started and only six finished, Twill Do and jockey James Stierhoff never wavered from their game plan, starting slowly before taking their first lead with three fences to go, then out-dueling Battle Op down the stretch to win by a half length in one of the closest finishes in race history.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker, Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2012
On the steeplechase course, William Meister frequently competes with a catch-me-if-you-can style and Saturday at the 110th Grand National in Glyndon, nobody could. Not even defending champion Private Attack, who went on to win the 2011 Maryland Hunt Cup by 60 lengths and was making his first sanctioned start of this season in preparation for this weekend's Hunt Cup. Private Attack, under Patrick Worrell, took his shot through the stretch, but Meister drove And The Eagle Flys in front with 100 yards to go and fought off the challenge to capture his third Grand National and first in 19 years.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | April 20, 2012
Each April, I look forward to the Saturday when the Grand National Steeplechase jockeys ride across a swath of unspoiled Baltimore County valley. From a vantage point atop a hill off Butler Road, just off Falls Road, I look out across the Western Run Valley and think how fortunate we are to have this setting — and the chance to visit it on a single spring afternoon. That's enough; too much traffic is not what this location needs. The countryside race, held Saturday, is over private estates and farms.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker, Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 20, 2012
At age 48, Billy Meister has covered the entire course of the Maryland steeplechase scene, starting even before he was born. "My mother had two falls [while riding] with me when she was pregnant. " he said, chuckling at the thought. Meister competed in a pony race at age 7 and began taking timber fences at 12. Seven years later, he launched a training career, and five years after that went on his own as a conditioner of jumpers. He has trained for virtually the entire gamut of owners who run in the state and is known as a highly capable, sometimes fearless, jockey.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | April 23, 2005
The racing season hasn't exactly gotten off to a rousing start for the two-time defending champion in the National Steeplechase Association trainer standings. In the first major timber event of the spring last weekend at My Lady's Manor, Jack Fisher-trained Sham Aciss had a comfortable lead approaching the next-to-last fence when he failed to make the jump, and Pleasant Parcel raced by to win easily. Fisher's bad fortune continued in the "little race" that followed when Plenty of Sweets also fell midway through the run while still competitive, sending rider Ellen Horner to the hospital.
SPORTS
By KENT BAKER and KENT BAKER,SUN REPORTER | April 23, 2006
On a miserable, rainy day in Butler, jockey Charles Fenwick III, trainer Ann D. Stewart and owner Irv Naylor left the 104th running of the Grand National Steeplechase with the sunniest dispositions. That trio combined to send out Askim to win the $30,000 feature in come-from-behind fashion before a crowd noticeably thinned by the weather. The New Zealand-born import prevailed by a comfortable margin over Sky And Sea, who set a leisurely pace after the early front-runner, Salmo, refused the water jump and sent rider Roger Horgan flying over the fence alone midway through the race.
EXPLORE
BY KAREN TOUSSAINT, Aegis Staff | October 5, 2011
For Bob Johnson, 2011 is a year to remember. On July 11, his 1964 Studebaker Avanti took first place in the Avanti Owners of America Grand National Show in Gettysburg, Pa., and on Sept. 11, his Shelby GT 500 KR (King of the Road) took first place at the Mustang Club of America Grand National Show in Waldorf, Md. Johnson said he decided to enter the competitions because they were close to his Kingsville home, and he always drives his cars to shows. Getting the Avanti ready to compete took an intense two weeks.
SPORTS
by Kent Baker, Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2011
The state's historic steeplechase season gets underway in earnest Saturday with the 101st edition of My Lady's Manor launching three consecutive weekends of major spring action. Feature purses begin with $35,000 for the big race at My Lady's Manor and conclude with a $75,000 offering at the Maryland Hunt Cup in Glyndon on April 30. While Tom Voss of Monkton (who has taken the early lead in the National Steeplechase Association trainer standings with three victories) campaigns at another meet near Atlanta, familiar top-flight local conditioners like Jack Fisher, William Meister, Ricky Hendriks, Katherine McKenna and Sanna Hendriks will have horses entered on the three-race Maryland card over timber.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.