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By Bev Bennett and Bev Bennett,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | October 7, 1990
A colleague used to write a column called "Meals in 60 Minutes," but the photographer who took photos to accompany it always referred to the column as Meals in a Minute.After a few years she decided that 60 minutes was too much time to ask readers to devote to dinner, so now she writes "Meals in Minutes," a compromise between their philosophies.If speed-cooking pushes the limits any further, cooks will need radar detectors in the kitchen. But if the choice is fast meals or fast food, I'm certainly willing to offer a quick menu to keep people cooking.
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By Evan Siple and By Evan Siple | November 19, 2013
Can a Margarita be seasonal without being summery? It seems by its very nature to be a warm-weather drink. Lip-smacking tart, heavy on the booze with or without a salted rim, the Margarita conjures beachfront images of fun and sunsets in far-flung locations. But the folks at Canton's Tavern on the Square are trying to flip that script and make a fall version of the time-honored cocktail: the Apple Cider Margarita. I know, I know. It seems like a reach. The sour mix is still there, as is, of course, Patron Resposado.
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By Jimmy Schmidt and Jimmy Schmidt,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | October 20, 1996
You can unlock the delicate, rich flavors of duck without getting even a hint of the gamey, tough qualities traditionally associated with it. The secret is a quick, high heat to develop and seal in the flavor, followed by a more moderate temperature to cook the meat.Trim the breast of excess fat and skin, but leave some in place to protect the meat. Season with salt and pepper just before cooking. Salting ahead will draw the juices to the surface, inhibiting the searing process and slightly drying out the meat.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Evan Siple | January 15, 2013
It's prime winter time and we here at b are always on the lookout for cocktails that conjure images of curling clenched hands around a mug, fire blazing and scarf draped upon neck - something that'll let you pretend we're actually having a winter here in Baltimore even when it's 56 degrees out in January. And while optimally the quintessential winter drink may come in a mug, sometimes you can find such a thing in a cocktail glass with fancy garnishes, much like Bradley's of Fells Point's aptly titled drink, Snowed In. Snowed In is interesting to say the least.
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By Sherrie Ruhl and Sherrie Ruhl,Evening Sun Staff | November 27, 1991
CALORIE-LADEN TREATS are a constant temptation during the holiday season. This orange glacee recipe, a combination of frozen yogurt, oranges and Grand Marnier, is elegant enough for the most discerning dieter.The Grand Marnier can be omitted and orange extract substituted, if you like.We decided to splurge -- it is after all the holiday season -- and doubled the recipe. We packed the doubled orange glacee filling into four oranges instead of eight, piling the extra filling on top. Then we garnished the whole shebang with a sprig of mint.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Evan Siple and By Evan Siple | November 19, 2013
Can a Margarita be seasonal without being summery? It seems by its very nature to be a warm-weather drink. Lip-smacking tart, heavy on the booze with or without a salted rim, the Margarita conjures beachfront images of fun and sunsets in far-flung locations. But the folks at Canton's Tavern on the Square are trying to flip that script and make a fall version of the time-honored cocktail: the Apple Cider Margarita. I know, I know. It seems like a reach. The sour mix is still there, as is, of course, Patron Resposado.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Sun Staff | December 22, 1999
A recipe for sugarplums was the request of Marie White of Rapid City, S.D. An informative and delicious response came from Bryon Predika of Baltimore.He wrote: "I have all kinds of arcane clippings and jottings in my file labeled 'backs of cards.' All this is to say that I have these recipes and all kinds of bits and pieces about sugarplums. None of them are original, but I have no idea where I found them."Grand Marnier will impart an orange perfume to these wonderful candies. The Victorians loved oranges and even presented them as gifts in holiday stockings.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Evan Siple | January 15, 2013
It's prime winter time and we here at b are always on the lookout for cocktails that conjure images of curling clenched hands around a mug, fire blazing and scarf draped upon neck - something that'll let you pretend we're actually having a winter here in Baltimore even when it's 56 degrees out in January. And while optimally the quintessential winter drink may come in a mug, sometimes you can find such a thing in a cocktail glass with fancy garnishes, much like Bradley's of Fells Point's aptly titled drink, Snowed In. Snowed In is interesting to say the least.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,SUN STAFF | May 29, 1996
Like fireworks, fireflies and the subtle smiles of babies, the charm of strawberries is due in some part to their ephemeral nature. Nowdays, you can, of course, get strawberries in some form virtually all year -- they come from California, Florida and Mexico. But the strawberries we remember are those that arrive in late spring, fresh from some nearby field, or fresh-picked right off the bush.Those are the berries that taste of sun and good sweet soil. They're plump and firm and juicy, and the first bite reminds you of every other warm spring day when you tasted the season's first bounty.
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By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | February 5, 2004
Passers-by on Bond Street in Fells Point notice the Christmas tree still lit in the window of One-Eyed Mike's, but not because it's been so long since the holiday passed. They stop to take pictures of a tree made of 121 Grand Marnier bottles. What they don't see is the nearly 3,000 shots that were poured from them. At One-Eyed Mike's, Grand Marnier - the heady cognac redolent of oranges and amber in hue - is the house specialty, not just a choice on the shelf. There's a club of Grand Marnier aficionados, 60 members strong, who pay $125 to belong.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Houser III, Special To The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2011
It was a roaring hot day, and the dark, cozy bar and dining room inside One-Eyed Mike's was packed. "It's an hour wait if you want to be seated inside," a bartender said. "We can seat you immediately outside. " That was fine with us — the dining area at One-Eyed Mike's is open and bright, and feels like a garden party. The atmosphere is certainly worth a trip. But it's hard to say the same for the food. Hidden off Broadway from the rest of Fell's Point watering holes, One-Eyed Mike's serves an older crowd — despite its pirate theme.
FEATURES
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | February 5, 2004
Passers-by on Bond Street in Fells Point notice the Christmas tree still lit in the window of One-Eyed Mike's, but not because it's been so long since the holiday passed. They stop to take pictures of a tree made of 121 Grand Marnier bottles. What they don't see is the nearly 3,000 shots that were poured from them. At One-Eyed Mike's, Grand Marnier - the heady cognac redolent of oranges and amber in hue - is the house specialty, not just a choice on the shelf. There's a club of Grand Marnier aficionados, 60 members strong, who pay $125 to belong.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Sun Staff | December 22, 1999
A recipe for sugarplums was the request of Marie White of Rapid City, S.D. An informative and delicious response came from Bryon Predika of Baltimore.He wrote: "I have all kinds of arcane clippings and jottings in my file labeled 'backs of cards.' All this is to say that I have these recipes and all kinds of bits and pieces about sugarplums. None of them are original, but I have no idea where I found them."Grand Marnier will impart an orange perfume to these wonderful candies. The Victorians loved oranges and even presented them as gifts in holiday stockings.
FEATURES
By Jimmy Schmidt and Jimmy Schmidt,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | October 20, 1996
You can unlock the delicate, rich flavors of duck without getting even a hint of the gamey, tough qualities traditionally associated with it. The secret is a quick, high heat to develop and seal in the flavor, followed by a more moderate temperature to cook the meat.Trim the breast of excess fat and skin, but leave some in place to protect the meat. Season with salt and pepper just before cooking. Salting ahead will draw the juices to the surface, inhibiting the searing process and slightly drying out the meat.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,SUN STAFF | May 29, 1996
Like fireworks, fireflies and the subtle smiles of babies, the charm of strawberries is due in some part to their ephemeral nature. Nowdays, you can, of course, get strawberries in some form virtually all year -- they come from California, Florida and Mexico. But the strawberries we remember are those that arrive in late spring, fresh from some nearby field, or fresh-picked right off the bush.Those are the berries that taste of sun and good sweet soil. They're plump and firm and juicy, and the first bite reminds you of every other warm spring day when you tasted the season's first bounty.
FEATURES
By Sherrie Ruhl and Sherrie Ruhl,Evening Sun Staff | November 27, 1991
CALORIE-LADEN TREATS are a constant temptation during the holiday season. This orange glacee recipe, a combination of frozen yogurt, oranges and Grand Marnier, is elegant enough for the most discerning dieter.The Grand Marnier can be omitted and orange extract substituted, if you like.We decided to splurge -- it is after all the holiday season -- and doubled the recipe. We packed the doubled orange glacee filling into four oranges instead of eight, piling the extra filling on top. Then we garnished the whole shebang with a sprig of mint.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Houser III, Special To The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2011
It was a roaring hot day, and the dark, cozy bar and dining room inside One-Eyed Mike's was packed. "It's an hour wait if you want to be seated inside," a bartender said. "We can seat you immediately outside. " That was fine with us — the dining area at One-Eyed Mike's is open and bright, and feels like a garden party. The atmosphere is certainly worth a trip. But it's hard to say the same for the food. Hidden off Broadway from the rest of Fell's Point watering holes, One-Eyed Mike's serves an older crowd — despite its pirate theme.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2011
John Houser III reviewed One-Eyed Mike's for Friday's Live section. What did he think of dinner at the world's first and largest Grand Marnier bar? He didn't like it so much. One-Eyed Mike's has an ardent following, myself included, and John's review has postive things to say about the atmosphere and the service but not the food. Read what his review has to say about his dinner at One-Eyed Mike's and tell your fellow readers what you think.
FEATURES
By Bev Bennett and Bev Bennett,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | October 7, 1990
A colleague used to write a column called "Meals in 60 Minutes," but the photographer who took photos to accompany it always referred to the column as Meals in a Minute.After a few years she decided that 60 minutes was too much time to ask readers to devote to dinner, so now she writes "Meals in Minutes," a compromise between their philosophies.If speed-cooking pushes the limits any further, cooks will need radar detectors in the kitchen. But if the choice is fast meals or fast food, I'm certainly willing to offer a quick menu to keep people cooking.
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