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Grand Hotel

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TRAVEL
By Donna M. Owens, Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2010
For his birthday last year, William Robertson chose to visit his favorite place: a lovely Italianate villa set in the lush Virginia countryside. And when the 7-year-old arrived at Keswick Hall, accompanied by his family, the staff at the luxury inn treated him like royalty. "There was a card in the room, and snacks," said his mother, Catherine Robertson. "Later, at dinner, the chef made him dessert with clef notes decorating the plate. And the pianist played, 'Happy Birthday.
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NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
- In the heart of this town on the old U.S. National Road in Western Maryland, a woman leans on the front desk of an 1890s-era hotel, her face a study in mixed emotions. Tina Storey loves her work as office manager of Failinger's Hotel Gunter, the grande dame of lodging in Frostburg with its polished oak staircase, Victorian settees and zillions of artifacts and displays that evoke the history of the so-called "Mountain Side of Maryland. " But she's still grieving the woman who revived the place.
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FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | February 21, 1991
WATCHING THE MUSICAL version of ''Grand Hotel'' is a little like booking a hotel room that is initially unappealing. In time, you get to like it, and in more time, you don't want to leave.That's the way it is with this show, the musical version of the Vicki Baum novel that was written in 1929. In 1932, it became an MGM film with Greta Garbo, Joan Crawford, Lionel and John Barrymore, Wallace Beery and Lewis Stone in the cast. The movie is now a certified classic, so anyone brash enough to do it for the stage, is asking for it.Tommy Tune is the man who did the asking.
TRAVEL
By Donna M. Owens, Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2010
For his birthday last year, William Robertson chose to visit his favorite place: a lovely Italianate villa set in the lush Virginia countryside. And when the 7-year-old arrived at Keswick Hall, accompanied by his family, the staff at the luxury inn treated him like royalty. "There was a card in the room, and snacks," said his mother, Catherine Robertson. "Later, at dinner, the chef made him dessert with clef notes decorating the plate. And the pianist played, 'Happy Birthday.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | March 1, 1991
Nearly 30 years ago, a car from Cumberland stopped at Ford's Theatre on Fayette Street. The occupants got out and took their seats, where the popular French comedy revue, "La Plume de Ma Tante," was playing.The lights went down in that ancient playhouse; the orchestra struck up. A dazzled 16 year-old from Allegany High School watched star Liliane Montevecchi perform on the stage. It was a revelation.The stage-struck teen-ager was Mark Baker, who today is one of the leads in "Grand Hotel," the Morris A. Mechanic Theatre's current attraction.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | March 14, 1991
"GRAND HOTEL," the musical in its last weekend at th Morris A. Mechanic Theatre, is remarkably faithful to the 1932 film on which it is based.The film version, a classic, was the blockbuster of its day. It was big in every way -- in story and production -- and above all, it had star power.Greta Garbo, John Barrymore, Joan Crawford, Wallace Beery, Lionel Barrymore, Lewis Stone and Jean Hersholt were in the cast. John Barrymore almost didn't make it. Garbo, still hoping to salvage the career of her ex-lover, John Gilbert,When the film opened in Baltimore at the Auditorium (later, the Mayfair)
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck | March 5, 1991
"I live in the Grand Hotel," jokes Mark Baker, the Cumberland-born actor who plays the dying bookkeeper in the touring company of "Grand Hotel," currently at the Mechanic Theatre.The vivacious, curly-haired actor isn't entirely kidding -- because he's constantly on tour, the hotel he's most familiar with is the one on stage.But there's another reason "Grand Hotel" feels like home; in a sense this tour represents a theatrical homecoming. Four years ago, the 44-year-old Mr. Baker stepped out of the limelight and resettled in Cumberland.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck | February 21, 1991
The scene is Berlin, 1928, Grand Hotel. It's the most expensive hotel in Europe, a place of luxury on the fringes of morality, where love and death dance a sinuous tango and everything is beautiful -- for a price.The musical that director-choreographer Tommy Tune has fashioned out of Vicki Baum's novel -- also the source of the 1932 Academy Award-winning movie -- checked into the Mechanic Theatre last night.Sometimes sentimental, but never mawkish, the production is the equal of its Broadway counterpart, with the exception of a few uneven performances.
FEATURES
By Jean Allen and Jean Allen,SUN-SENTINEL, SOUTH FLORIDA | January 11, 1998
Years ago, when we lived in the Midwest, we spent a weekend at the Grand Hotel on Mackinac Island in Michigan. It was our first stay at a resort hotel, and we remember it as being very posh and elegant and the island as an old-fashioned place with no motor traffic.The Grand was not new even then, so I suppose it is no longer so grand and we would be disappointed if we went back, although we talk about doing so. Can you tell us anything about the hotel and the island as they are today?You wouldn't be disappointed.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | June 5, 1999
In a scene from Vicki Baum's potboiler novel "Grand Hotel" played out in the 1932 MGM classic film of the same name, actor Lewis Stone looks out over the crowded hotel lobby filled with the comings and goings of Greta Garbo, John and Lionel Barrymore, Joan Crawford and Jean Hersholt and wryly mutters, "Grand Hotel ... people come ... people go ... nothing ever happens." Unlike the fictional Grand Hotel, something is sure to happen soon at Baltimore's Southern Hotel, the long-shuttered 14-story "Queen of Light Street" that opened for business in 1918 and closed its doors in 1964.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | July 16, 2005
Where generations of sweaty shipyard workers once toiled repairing sea-worn vessels at Bethlehem Steel Corp.'s former Key Highway Shipyard, the fabled Ritz name will soon endow an upscale condominium development. Only a few words have come to permanently define elegance and luxury; here are two: the Duesenberg - the classic 1930s motorcar that spawned the phrase, "It's a doozy," - and the Ritz, which has become synonymous with going first class. If doozy was a car, then Ritz was a man, whose first name was Cesar, and whose friend, England's King Edward VII, described him as the "king of hoteliers and the hotelier of kings."
TRAVEL
By Stephanie D. Fletcher and Stephanie D. Fletcher,Special to the Sun | June 25, 2000
The Palm Court lobby of the Jefferson Hotel in Richmond, Va., is a prime spot for people-watching. On a recent Saturday night, my husband and I planted ourselves on a love seat and watched the show. First, a bride and groom in full wedding regalia swept by our settee. Ten minutes later, another resplendent pair of newlyweds walked past. They descended the marble steps of the Grand Staircase to a reception party amid a volley of camera flashes and a chorus of "oohs!" Pretty girls in pastel prom dresses and handsome boys in tuxedos crossed the Palm Court from stretch limos to Lemaire, the Jefferson's five-star restaurant.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | June 5, 1999
In a scene from Vicki Baum's potboiler novel "Grand Hotel" played out in the 1932 MGM classic film of the same name, actor Lewis Stone looks out over the crowded hotel lobby filled with the comings and goings of Greta Garbo, John and Lionel Barrymore, Joan Crawford and Jean Hersholt and wryly mutters, "Grand Hotel ... people come ... people go ... nothing ever happens." Unlike the fictional Grand Hotel, something is sure to happen soon at Baltimore's Southern Hotel, the long-shuttered 14-story "Queen of Light Street" that opened for business in 1918 and closed its doors in 1964.
FEATURES
By Jean Allen and Jean Allen,SUN-SENTINEL, SOUTH FLORIDA | January 11, 1998
Years ago, when we lived in the Midwest, we spent a weekend at the Grand Hotel on Mackinac Island in Michigan. It was our first stay at a resort hotel, and we remember it as being very posh and elegant and the island as an old-fashioned place with no motor traffic.The Grand was not new even then, so I suppose it is no longer so grand and we would be disappointed if we went back, although we talk about doing so. Can you tell us anything about the hotel and the island as they are today?You wouldn't be disappointed.
BUSINESS
By Gary Gately and Gary Gately,SUN STAFF | July 2, 1997
Orioles owner Peter Angelos called on Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke yesterday to honor his "personal commitment" to proceed with the proposed Grand Hyatt on city land next to the Baltimore Convention Center instead of delaying any hotel opening there until 2002.A spokesman for the mayor said Schmoke would refuse to do so.Angelos' comments came a day after the city's economic development agency voted to forbid the opening of any hotel on the four acres at Camden Yards until at least 2002.The Baltimore Development Corp.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | July 30, 1996
Once the Olympics are over, are you prepared to deal with post-Olympics stress syndrome, the trauma of not being able to watch any more of the games of the 26th Olympiad? Probably not, so maybe you should try to ease yourself back into the mundane reality of everyday TV life by watching just one non-Olympics piece of programming tonight. Here are some suggestions."Nova" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., MPT, Channels 22 and 67) -- "Terror in the Mine Fields" visits Cambodia and looks at the danger of living in a country where 25 years of war have left millions of land mines buried underground.
NEWS
April 5, 1993
Eugenie Leontovich, 93, a Russian-born actress, teacher and playwright who created memorable roles on Broadway in "Grand Hotel," "Twentieth Century" and "Anastasia," died Friday in New York.
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella | February 17, 1991
Tommy Tune would see them in the lobbies of the old grand hotels of Europe, the aristocratic class caught short by the fast-forward of time, as faded as the furniture, as once-elegant and now-tattered as their surroundings."
FEATURES
By Robert Hilburn and Robert Hilburn,Los Angeles Times | December 31, 1993
The fortysomething woman wearing the sparkling black Barbra Streisand concert sweat shirt paused during her marathon assault on the quarter slots at the new MGM Grand Hotel in Las Vegas.Standing and stretching near the massive lobby of the $1 billion hotel, casino and theme park, the woman pointed to the $1,100 jackpot total on the machine."I'm going to keep at it until I win enough to buy a front-row ticket to Barbra's show," she said, good-naturedly.If the machine pays off, the fan could most certainly score a ticket to one of Ms. Streisand's two shows here this weekend, but $1,100 isn't likely to buy her a front-row seat.
NEWS
April 5, 1993
Eugenie Leontovich, 93, a Russian-born actress, teacher and playwright who created memorable roles on Broadway in "Grand Hotel," "Twentieth Century" and "Anastasia," died Friday in New York.
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