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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 23, 1997
GRAND FORKS, N.D. -- When flood and flames destroyed the offices of the town's newspaper last weekend, residents lost a way to reach back into their past.The blaze that destroyed the Grand Forks Herald's building was part of a huge downtown fire. Floodwaters kept firefighters from saving the building and the thousands of newspaper clippings, going back more than a century, stored inside. The newspaper covered the granting of North Dakota's statehood in 1889.Most of the history has been saved, since copies of every paper for much of this century have been stored, as is required by law, in the North Dakota Historical Society in the capital, Bismarck, and transferred to microfilm.
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NEWS
By Ted Gregory and Ted Gregory,Chicago Tribune | April 22, 2007
GRAND FORKS, N.D. -- By virtually every barometer, this northern outpost that gave the world Cream of Wheat and a perennial college hockey powerhouse is on a run that makes real estate agents and urban planners salivate. In the past decade, the region added almost 12 percent more jobs. All the public schools are nearly new or rehabbed. A new river greenway twice the size of New York City's Central Park is a short walk from sold-out condos being built downtown. And, this afternoon, the city is hosting a free rib dinner in its stunning, multi-use arena.
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NEWS
March 11, 2005
On Thursday, March 3, 2005, RANDY H. LEE, 60, of of Grand Forks, ND, died in Altru Hospital, Grand Forks, North Dakota. Visitation was held on Tuesday, March 8, 2005, from 5 to 7 P. M with a 7 P. M Prayer Service in Amundson Funeral Home, 2975 South 42nd Steet, Grand Forks, ND. Memorial Services were held Wednesday, March 9, 2005 at 1:30 P. M at the Chester Fritz Auditorium, Grand Forks, ND. Interment will be Tuesday, March 15, 2005 at 11:00 A.M. in...
BUSINESS
By THIS COLUMN WAS COMPILED FROM DISPATCHES BY KNIGHT-RIDDER/TRIBUNE, THE ASSO- CIATED PRESS AND BLOOMBERG NEWS | December 23, 2005
Nation: Media Knight Ridder union seeks buyout advice A union representing advertising, circulation and editorial workers at Knight Ridder Inc. newspapers said yesterday that it has hired financial advisers to solicit investors for a "worker-friendly" buyout of nine unionized papers in the chain. "Standing still is not an option," said Linda Foley, president of the Newspaper Guild-Communication Workers of America. "We are going to go after those properties and we are going to attempt to persuade others in labor, management and the investment community to join us."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 21, 1997
GRAND FORKS, N.D. -- As most of the die-hards fled yesterday from this unlivable city, struck by both flood and fire, residents began coming to grips with the knowledge that it could be weeks before they can return.The supply of drinking water has run out, and the sewage, oil and animal carcasses fouling the floodwaters have prompted fears of disease.In another blow to the battered city, a fire downtown added to the misery over the weekend. Flames destroyed three buildings and damaged several others.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 21, 1997
GRAND FORKS, N.D. -- As most of the die-hards fled yesterday from this unlivable city, struck by both flood and fire, residents began coming to grips with the knowledge that it could be weeks before they can return.The supply of drinking water has run out, and the sewage, oil and animal carcasses fouling the floodwaters have prompted fears of disease.In another blow to the battered city, a fire downtown added to the misery over the weekend. Flames destroyed three buildings and damaged several others.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder | August 13, 1991
WASHINGTON -- A stiff southwest wind blowing across the Dakota prairie nearly 11 years ago apparently saved the United States from a nuclear disaster that could have been "worse than Chernobyl."Had the wind shifted, a fire that raged for three hours on a B-52 bomber at the Air Force base near Grand Forks, N.D., would have reached the plane's thermonuclear weapons and touched off the conventional explosives inside them.The resulting blast would have blown particles of radioactive plutonium over a 60-square-mile area of North Dakota and Minnesota, said Dr. Roger Batzel, who was head of a weapons lab when he testified before a closed Senate hearing in 1988.
NEWS
March 6, 2004
On Friday, March 5, 2004; KENNETH B., husband of the late Bertha M. Mertel; brother-in-law of Vaughn R. Shinaberry. Also, survived by several nieces and nephews and members of the Ensey family. Friends may call on Monday from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 PM at the Stallings Funeral Home, P.A., 3111 Mountain Road, Pasadena, where funeral services will be held on Tuesday 12 noon. Interment Cedar Hill Cemetery. Memorial Contributions to the American Heart Association.27, 2004, LORETTA MARIE SCHMISEK MYERS, 64, of Roanoke and formerly of Catonsville, MD, passed away peacefully at her home following a courageous battle with cancer.
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder / Tribune | February 24, 2002
My advice to aspiring humor columnists is: Never make fun of North Dakota. Because the North Dakotans will invite you, nicely but relentlessly, to visit, and eventually you'll have to accept. When you get there, they'll be incredibly nice to you, treating you with such warmth and hospitality that before long you feel almost like family. Then they will try to asphyxiate you with sewer gas. I found this out when I went to Grand Forks, N.D., in January. I had made fun of Grand Forks and its sister city, East Grand Forks, Minn.
NEWS
By Grand Forks (N D.) Herald | November 21, 1990
IT WOULD be reassuring if Bush toned down the rhetoric while he built up the armies. There may yet be a diplomatic solution to this crisis.There have been suggestions that Iraq might be satisfied with better access to the sea, control of an uninhabited sandbar and an indemnity for Kuwait's well-documented theft of oil and its shenanigans in the oil cartels. With these conditions, Kuwait could be restored as an independent nation, perhaps with a U.N. peace-keeping force stationed there.If such a settlement is possible, it ought to be sought.
NEWS
March 11, 2005
On Thursday, March 3, 2005, RANDY H. LEE, 60, of of Grand Forks, ND, died in Altru Hospital, Grand Forks, North Dakota. Visitation was held on Tuesday, March 8, 2005, from 5 to 7 P. M with a 7 P. M Prayer Service in Amundson Funeral Home, 2975 South 42nd Steet, Grand Forks, ND. Memorial Services were held Wednesday, March 9, 2005 at 1:30 P. M at the Chester Fritz Auditorium, Grand Forks, ND. Interment will be Tuesday, March 15, 2005 at 11:00 A.M. in...
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder / Tribune | January 2, 2005
THERE COMES A time in the life of every writer when he asks himself -- as Shakespeare, Tolstoy and Hemingway all surely asked themselves -- if he has any booger jokes left in him. For me, that time has come. I've been trying to entertain newspaper readers since the '60s, when I wrote "humor" columns for the Haverford College News. I put "humor" in quotation marks because when I go back and read those columns today, I don't get any of the jokes. But at the time they were a big hit with my readership, which consisted pretty much of my roommates.
NEWS
March 6, 2004
On Friday, March 5, 2004; KENNETH B., husband of the late Bertha M. Mertel; brother-in-law of Vaughn R. Shinaberry. Also, survived by several nieces and nephews and members of the Ensey family. Friends may call on Monday from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 PM at the Stallings Funeral Home, P.A., 3111 Mountain Road, Pasadena, where funeral services will be held on Tuesday 12 noon. Interment Cedar Hill Cemetery. Memorial Contributions to the American Heart Association.27, 2004, LORETTA MARIE SCHMISEK MYERS, 64, of Roanoke and formerly of Catonsville, MD, passed away peacefully at her home following a courageous battle with cancer.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | June 14, 2002
GRAND FORKS, N.D. - Just how deep was the Red River of the North in 1997 when it washed over this city and neighboring East Grand Forks, Minn.? Step inside the Grand Forks Herald's clock tower, built after the flood, and look up. Its ceiling stands at 54 feet - the river's depth at its worst. Or visit East Grand Forks' new Monticello-inspired City Hall across the river. Not to be outdone, the city put 54-foot ceilings in the lobby and adorned the building with 54 white columns. Both buildings are 97 feet tall, for the year of the flood.
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder / Tribune | February 24, 2002
My advice to aspiring humor columnists is: Never make fun of North Dakota. Because the North Dakotans will invite you, nicely but relentlessly, to visit, and eventually you'll have to accept. When you get there, they'll be incredibly nice to you, treating you with such warmth and hospitality that before long you feel almost like family. Then they will try to asphyxiate you with sewer gas. I found this out when I went to Grand Forks, N.D., in January. I had made fun of Grand Forks and its sister city, East Grand Forks, Minn.
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder / Tribune | November 11, 2001
North Dakota is calling me. "Come on up!" it says. And then it adds: "Bring thermal underwear!" This invitation resulted from a column in which I poked fun at North Dakota for wanting to drop the word "North" from its name, so that people will stop thinking of it as a cold, frigid, freezing, subzero, arctic, polar, wintry place characterized by low temperatures. My column also made fun of Grand Forks, N.D., and East Grand Forks, Minn., for marketing themselves as "The Grand Cities" and proclaiming that they are "where the earth meets the sky."
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder / Tribune | November 11, 2001
North Dakota is calling me. "Come on up!" it says. And then it adds: "Bring thermal underwear!" This invitation resulted from a column in which I poked fun at North Dakota for wanting to drop the word "North" from its name, so that people will stop thinking of it as a cold, frigid, freezing, subzero, arctic, polar, wintry place characterized by low temperatures. My column also made fun of Grand Forks, N.D., and East Grand Forks, Minn., for marketing themselves as "The Grand Cities" and proclaiming that they are "where the earth meets the sky."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 22, 1997
GRAND FORKS, N.D. -- Sitting in the emergency shelter, knowing that everything back home might be lost to the Red River flood, Deb Storey looked at her hand, gasped and began to cry.She had forgotten to wear the wedding ring her mother had left to her."So much has been lost," said Ms. Storey, 40, a bank employee, "and we don't know where it's going to end."The Red River crested at about 54 feet yesterday, nearly twice the flood stage. Officials said that it will be at least three weeks before residents can return.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 23, 1997
GRAND FORKS, N.D. -- When flood and flames destroyed the offices of the town's newspaper last weekend, residents lost a way to reach back into their past.The blaze that destroyed the Grand Forks Herald's building was part of a huge downtown fire. Floodwaters kept firefighters from saving the building and the thousands of newspaper clippings, going back more than a century, stored inside. The newspaper covered the granting of North Dakota's statehood in 1889.Most of the history has been saved, since copies of every paper for much of this century have been stored, as is required by law, in the North Dakota Historical Society in the capital, Bismarck, and transferred to microfilm.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 22, 1997
GRAND FORKS, N.D. -- Sitting in the emergency shelter, knowing that everything back home might be lost to the Red River flood, Deb Storey looked at her hand, gasped and began to cry.She had forgotten to wear the wedding ring her mother had left to her."So much has been lost," said Ms. Storey, 40, a bank employee, "and we don't know where it's going to end."The Red River crested at about 54 feet yesterday, nearly twice the flood stage. Officials said that it will be at least three weeks before residents can return.
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