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By Mary Alice Fallon Yeskey | August 16, 2012
This week, the chefs leave the comfy confines of their climate controlled Vegas kitchen for a more rustic setting. But first, Curtis introduces the Quickfire by revealing a huge salad bar that the chefs will use to compose a salad. "Here's your salad bar," he says. "It's as big as a whale. And you've got eight minutes to make it set sail. " The chefs dash into the challenge horrified at the short time limit, without getting his musical reference. Der. Eight minutes is indeed a crazy short time, and they are more frenzied than normal.
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NEWS
By Jules Witcover | July 29, 2013
Many present-day Republicans seem bent on making "Backward, Christian Soldiers" their marching song in their relentless determination to "repeal and replace Obamacare," even to the point of repeating their lemming-like plunge over the cliff of another government shutdown. More than 60 of them in the House and about a dozen in the Senate have signed letters by conservative GOP Sen. Mike Lee of Utah and Rep. Mark Meadows of North Carolina pledging to vote to defund President Barack Obama's Affordable Care Act, despite some party warnings of likely political suicide.
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NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | October 4, 1994
GRAND CANYON NATIONAL PARK, Ariz. -- What's it worth to you, Mr. and Mrs. America, to know that the delicate balance of water, rock and life that makes up the Grand Canyon ecosystem is functioning the way nature intended? Now, would you be willing to pay that amount in monthly installments on your electricity bill?The answers could help determine whether Americans' love of nature will prevail over their hunger for electricity in a key environmental dispute over a hydroelectric dam on the Colorado River -- the body of water that is at the Grand Canyon's heart.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | June 22, 2013
When Nik Wallenda attempts to traverse the Grand Canyon some 1,500 feet above the Little Colorado River on Sunday, those watching on television will benefit from the technical expertise of a Maryland-based company that will outfit the 34-year-old self-described "King of the Wire" for his latest midair adventure. Peter Larsson co-founded Broadcast Sports Inc. four years after Wallenda was born and moved from his native Australia, where he and partner John Porter worked for a television station, to Connecticut.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | January 23, 1991
Researchers from St. Louis, Reno, Nev., and San Diego have found that industrial chemicals released in the Los Angeles area show up in the Nevada and Arizona deserts one to two days later. The chemicals, which serve as tracers to monitor large-scale air movements, indicate that pollutants from Los Angeles make a significant contribution to the haze and smog that frequently obscure vision at the Grand Canyon.In a novel finding, the researchers showed that the average concentrations of the tracer chemicals, called halocarbons, in the desert exhibited a seven-day cycle that mimics the Los Angeles work week, with five days of elevated readings and two days of lower readings.
FEATURES
By Frank Rizzo and Frank Rizzo,The Hartford Courant | January 16, 1992
NEW YORK -- Kevin Kline is being a good guy again.It's a role the actor has played before, most notably in 1983's "The Big Chill," in which he portrayed a successful businessman and unofficial patriarch of a small circle of old college friends.In subsequent years, his roles have had much more panache, ranging from the caustic cowboy in "Silverado," to an insatiable Italian pizza maker in "I Love You to Death," to his Oscar-winning performance as Otto West, the profoundly stupid crook, in "A Fish Called Wanda."
TRAVEL
By KNIGHT RIDDER / TRIBUNE | October 9, 2005
We're looking for spacious cabins for two families at the Grand Canyon next summer. Any suggestions? You can find some great hotels with large rooms or suites, but there's nothing that could be considered a cabin, with bedrooms and a kitchen. However, most hotels should be able to accommodate you with rollaway beds. Your best option on the South Rim might be the El Tovar Hotel, originally built in 1905. Some of its suites have two queen beds and a sitting room. Off-rim lodges include Maswik Lodge and Yavapai Lodge, both about a quarter-mile from the canyon's edge and perfect for families.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | January 29, 2008
If you love great football, you're probably wondering why the NFL chose to put this season's Super Bowl in Arizona. If you love a great cactus, however, this desert wonderland is the place to be. There are hundreds of varieties of cacti and succulents dotting the arid landscape that surrounds the Phoenix metropolitan area, including the classic saguaro cactus that can grow to heights of more than 50 feet. For some strange reason, however, cactus climbing has never caught on here. The locals enjoy golf, tennis and telling people how to get to the Grand Canyon, but they are also proud of the striking desertscapes burned into our collective consciousness by the many Western movies and television shows set here.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL PAKENHAM | August 23, 1998
In size and impact - more physical even than visual - the Grand Canyon defies description. Everybody who has stood at its rim or floated the waters of the Colorado River, which carved it, knows forever its immensity. No one else can; it must be witnessed.It was one of the earliest natural wonders of North America to be visited by Europeans, apparently first by Spanish conquistadors 1540, 60 years before the discovery of Niagara Falls. But - extraordinarily - it took more than three centuries for it to begin to be appreciated.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | October 21, 1990
GRAND CANYON NATIONAL PARK, Ariz. -- If anyone tells you to go take a hike, try the Grand Canyon."It's one of the things you check off in life -- a life experience," said Mike Meyer, a National Park Service supervising ranger on the canyon's south rim. "You hike the canyon." This is a perfect time for it. In spring and fall the weather is cool and hiking conditions are more favorable than in summer, when it's hot and crowded."This is a desert," exclaimed Beverly Perry, a back country park ranger specialist.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2013
Orioles first baseman Chris Davis has been here before, with fans screaming his name and his teammates shaking their heads at his latest incredible power display. Davis, though, also has been on the other side, when things are going terribly and he's sent to the minors and he's not really sure he can play this game. So that's why, after his eighth-inning grand slam in Friday's home opener - which gave the Orioles' a 9-5 win over the Minnesota Twins and Davis a mind-numbing four homers and 16 RBIs in four 2013 games - the extroverted first baseman was rather subdued.
FEATURES
By Sloane Brown and For The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2012
Wedding Day: Aug. 11, 2012 Her story: Alexandra Heifetz-Jones, 29, grew up in Dayton. She lives in Davis, Calif., and is in her second year at the University of California-Davis School of Law. Her mother, Suzanne Heifetz, is a clinical social worker in geriatric psychiatry at the University of Maryland Medical Center. Her father, Daniel Heifetz, is a mathematician on the research staff for the Institute for Defense Analyses. His story: Kyle Jones, 27, grew up in Richmond, Va. He lives in Davis, Calif., and works at the Apple store in Sacramento; he's also a freelance photographer/videographer.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Alice Fallon Yeskey | August 16, 2012
This week, the chefs leave the comfy confines of their climate controlled Vegas kitchen for a more rustic setting. But first, Curtis introduces the Quickfire by revealing a huge salad bar that the chefs will use to compose a salad. "Here's your salad bar," he says. "It's as big as a whale. And you've got eight minutes to make it set sail. " The chefs dash into the challenge horrified at the short time limit, without getting his musical reference. Der. Eight minutes is indeed a crazy short time, and they are more frenzied than normal.
NEWS
March 22, 2012
While the nation's coldest spots are typically in Wisconsin, Michigan or upstate New York, the unusual weather patterns this month have changed that. Tuesday, the nation's lowest temperature was recorded in the Grand Canyon , at 1 degree below zero. That's not a total anomaly - the great national park posted a national low in March 2011, too. And cold spots are common in New Mexico and Colorado, as well. But the cold weather typical along the Great Lakes region has been noticeably absent, with daytime highs in the 80s and strings of record-breaking heat.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | December 15, 2011
Composer Bob Christianson is nothing if not versatile. He wrote a lot of pulsating music that accompanied episodes about several, um, energetic women in New York on the HBO series "Sex and the City. " He has provided themes for Travel Channel's "Mysteries of the Museum" and "Inside the Grand Canyon," and the Military Channel's "The Day After D-Day," to name a few more. His credits also include themes for sports programs and promos on ABC and ESPN. "Which is funny," Christianson said, "because I am not a sports person.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | January 3, 2010
The Maryland Science Center wants Baltimore moviegoers to know that sensory-immersion filmmaking didn't start with "Avatar." For more than 20 years, the five-story screen of the center's IMAX theater has featured thrills every bit as spine-tingling as seeing 10-foot-tall blue aliens ride flying dragons through floating mountains. "Avatar" has been great propaganda for IMAX theaters: They've accounted for a whopping 12 percent of that blockbuster's domestic gross. Starting Tuesday , the center hopes to attract fans of all kinds - not only fantasy or sci-fi freaks, or lovers of artificial spectacle - to an IMAX film festival.
FEATURES
By Jerry Flemmons and Jerry Flemmons,Fort Worth Star-Telegram | November 7, 1993
Jacob Lake is a weathered pause at the corner of U.S. Alt. 89 and Arizona 67, just a motel and adjacent cabins, service station, restaurant and souvenir shop lost in Kaibab National Forest.The forest -- mostly pinons and junipers thickly spread across Kaibab Plateau -- is a kind of upraised island in the desert of northern Arizona, and Jacob Lake is its only sign of life.You turn south at the junction, onto Arizona 67, and 44 mileslater is the Grand Canyon few ever see -- the North Rim.Little argument that the Grand Canyon is America's most formidable natural wonder.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter SO:.Sun Film Critic | January 17, 1992
Any movie calling itself "Grand Canyon" ought to be pretty deep, or it's going to get itself laughed off the screen.Pardon the noise, but ha, ha, ha.Deep? You could fill it with water and stand in it for an hour and go home with dry socks. Written and directed by Lawrence Kasdan as a meditation on random violence and the breakdown of social convention, it lacks the vigor or the guts to be of any use to anyone.Kasdan zeroes in on a group of Los Angelinos who must confront urban disruption on a daily basis and come to terms with it. Mostly, the coming to terms involves endless stilted dialogue of the touchy-feely variety and tepidly ironic interactions, against the fabric of the disintegrating city.
FEATURES
By Mark Gross and Mark Gross,mark.gross@baltsun.com | August 21, 2009
Rumor has it Travis Pastrana did a backflip the day he was born - and stuck the landing. That's the story, at least, according to travispastrana.com. Though the Annapolis-born motocross and rally car champ's Web site stretches the truth about his birth, the action sport athlete's extreme feats seem just as impossible. In 2006, Pastrana received widespread recognition for landing motocross' first backflip. Today, he continues to thrill spectators with dirt bike double-backflips and plunges into the Grand Canyon.
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