Advertisement
HomeCollectionsGrammy Awards
IN THE NEWS

Grammy Awards

FEATURES
By Jim Abbott and Jim Abbott,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 3, 2003
When Norah Jones tours the country this summer, she'll still be basking in the glow of being the "Next Big Thing." That's what happens when a relatively unknown 23-year-old rises from obscurity to claim five Grammy Awards in a sweep of major categories. The big question is what her status might be in five years. Or, as Robin Williams joked on last week's show, holding a gramophone trophy to his ear: "Oh, my God! Listen! It's the sound of careers ending." Jones' understated Come Away With Me was honored as best album and best pop vocal album.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | January 6, 1995
Sheryl Crow, Bonnie Raitt and Bruce Springsteen are among the top Grammy contenders this year, with each artist nominated yesterday for five awards. Maryland natives Mary Chapin Carpenter and Me'Shell NdegeOcello are up for four awards each, as are Green Day, Soundgarden and Seal.But the lion's share of nominations went to Disney's "The Lion King" and its spin-offs, which snagged a total of nine nominations in seven categories -- including two shots at Song of the Year (for "Can You Feel the Love Tonight" and "Circle of Life," both written by Elton John and Tim Rice)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Greg Kot and Greg Kot,Special to the Sun | November 4, 2001
If only for his role in shaping Sarah Vaughan's immortal version of "Misty," Frank Sinatra's "Fly Me to the Moon" or Michael Jackson's pop landmark "Thriller," Quincy Jones' place in music history would be assured. But perhaps a better barometer of Jones' abilities -- not just as the consummate behind-the-scenes music man, but as an amateur psychologist, motivational speaker and conjurer of minor miracles -- are those sessions when he was working with material of far lesser quality than "Misty."
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,SUN STAFF | February 13, 2000
Seasoned TV viewers know better than to watch award shows for the awards. Boring speeches, big bad production numbers and flubbed lines? Come on. The real reason to watch the Grammy Awards (Feb. 23) and the Academy Awards (March 26) is to see what the stars wear. New York-based celebrity makeup artist Maria Verel -- whose client list includes Grammy nominees Emmylou Harris and Diana Krall, not to mention Diane Sawyer, Emme and Lucy Lawless -- says you don't have to be a star to dress and wear your hair and makeup like one. Her thoughts on the topic: Q: What can we expect to see women wearing at awards shows this spring?
NEWS
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | February 8, 2004
They're usually a day late and 50 Cent short when it comes to musical trends. But the annual Grammy Awards, pop's most important showcase, has finally jumped onto the hip-hop and contemporary rhythm-and-blues bandwagon. And, urban America wonders, where have they been for 25 years? Hip-hop, with its incessant beats and spoken rhymes, and modern R&B, which mixes elements of hip-hop with the soulful, soaring vocals of a generation ago, rule the airwaves. Together, they make up a multibillion-dollar part of the music industry, having slowly and steadily usurped genres such as grunge, alternative rock and, with a few exceptions, good old pop and rock.
FEATURES
By Jim Abbott and Jim Abbott,ORLANDO SENTINEL | December 8, 2004
New faces of R&B and one of the genre's legends are among the leading nominees for top honors at the 47th annual Grammy Awards. Innovative rapper Kanye West leads the field with 10 nods, followed by R&B sex symbol Usher and the soulful Alicia Keys with eight each. The legendary Ray Charles has seven nominations for his posthumously released all-star duet album Genius Loves Company. Usher was expected to lead the nominations announced yesterday, so it was surprising to some industry insiders that West managed to slip by him. Usher's Confessions has sold more than 7 million copies, roughly three times as many as West's The College Dropout.
FEATURES
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | February 12, 2007
The Dixie Chicks may not have been ready to make nice, but last night, band members showed they weren't above gloating -- at least a little -- as they accepted five honors at the 49th annual Grammy Awards, including record of the year, song of the year and best album. The super-trio was snubbed by many country fans and radio stations after lead singer Natalie Maines made disparaging comments in 2003 about President Bush. Taking the Long Way, last night's winning album, was ignored by the Country Music Association at its November awards ceremony.
FEATURES
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | February 22, 2001
It was with nothing less than great irony that Madonna kicked off last night's Grammy Awards ceremony with a performance of her hit "Music," with its la-la-land, love-fest lyrics like "Music makes the people come together." The ultimate pop diva even emphasized the air of all cultures and people coming together by stepping out of a flashy, silver limo that could have fit into many a Jay-Z music video. And she even incorporated another genre in her act when she had the potty-mouthed, 13-year-old rapper Lil Bow Wow open the limo door for her. However, just moments before Madonna's let's-all-hold-hands act, hundreds had gathered outside Staples Center in Los Angeles to protest the four Grammy nominations of controversial rap star Eminem.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Matthew Hay Brown,Sun Reporter | June 3, 2007
THE POLITICAL SCIENTIST LANGDON WINNER HAPpened to be driving across the country in June 1967 -- just days after the Beatles released Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band. "In each city where I stopped for gas or food -- Laramie, Ogallala, Moline, South Bend -- the melodies wafted in from some far-off transistor radio or portable hi-fi," he would write. "For a brief while, the irreparably fragmented consciousness of the West was unified, at least in the minds of the young." Forty years later, former Beatle Paul McCartney will attempt to re-create that spirit on Tuesday, when Starbucks hosts a 24-hour "worldwide listening party" with his new CD, Memory Almost Full, set on repeat at more than 10,000 locations in 29 countries.
FEATURES
By LAURA CHARLES | February 17, 1991
FOR THE INSIDE scoop on the goings on at the 33rd annual Grammy Awards -- which will air at 8 p.m. Wednesday on WBAL-TV (Channel 11) -- tune in to Chris Emry and the gang on WIYY-FM's morning show, who'll be broadcasting from New York Tuesday to Saturday.Scheduled to appear on the broadcasts are Sting, Robin Leach, Dr. Ruth Westheimer, Gilbert Gottfried and Tony Bennett."We have a ball every year," Emry says.NAME DROPPING: Actor Kevin Bacon was thrilled when Flite III Studio recently arranged a private screening of his film "Flatliners" for him and some family members.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.