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By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | February 14, 2005
We've come to expect nothing less than bloat and bombast from the Grammys. And, for the most part, that's what we got last night. Maybe that was to be expected after a year in which the most successful pop music was mostly predictable and unadventurous. But the 47th Annual Grammy Awards, hosted by a resplendently Pearl Bailey-esque Queen Latifah, carried on in that spirit. The choppy opening performances featuring the Black Eyed Peas (who used to be cool and edgy before they struck platinum with innocuous party pap)
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By Louis Balsamo | February 5, 2014
If I had to distill into one image the experience of growing up gay in America, it would be that of the angry right-wing protester brandishing a handmade sign with "GOD HATES FAGS!" menacingly scrawled across it in capital letters. I was born in 1960, and in my 53 years, I've had the unfortunate opportunity to see some version of this image countless times in the media. As a gay teen still years away from my first kiss, I was not buying it. Ironically, religion saved me. I didn't know who that God was, but he wasn't mine.
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By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | February 25, 1992
Unless you're the kind of music fan who enjoys reading the fine print, odds are that you've never heard of Michael Kamen. That's not to say you haven't heard him; between his film scores and the orchestral arrangements he has written for rockers ranging from Kate Bush to Eric Clapton to Metallica, Kamen definitely gets around.Tonight, in fact, Kamen is likely to be all over the 34th annual Grammy Awards broadcast (8 p.m. on CBS, Channel 11). Not only is his score for the Kevin Costner film "Robin Hood"' up for three Grammys -- Best Pop Instrumental, Best Instrumental Composition Written for a Motion Picture or Television, and Best Arrangement on an Instrumental -- but "(Everything I Do)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2013
The fourth of July is the only time of year Andrew Dost requests off from his job. Each year with his family, Dost - the multi-instrumentalist for the pop trio fun. - celebrates the holiday with a multi-day event full of reunions, games, food and fun. "Our manager knows that's off limits," Dost said. He tried anyway. With some timidity in his voice, the manager approached Dost about a special gig: fun. had been asked to perform on the White House lawn. Dost's plans quickly changed.
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By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | March 2, 1995
Los Angeles -- On the whole, Grammy would rather have been on the Streets of Philadelphia.At least that's the way it seemed last night, when Bruce Springsteen's AIDS-inspired single, "Streets of Philadelphia," swept the 37th Annual Grammy Awards. Springsteen was up for four awards -- Record of the Year, Song of the Year, Best Male Rock Vocal Performance, Best Rock Song, and Best Original Song Written Specifically for a Motion Picture or Television -- and won all of them but Record of the Year, which went to Sheryl Crow for "All I Wanna Do."
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By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | February 14, 2005
Ray Charles made his final album, Genius Loves Company, to honor some of the friends and artists he had loved over a lifetime. Last night, the Recording Academy returned the favor, awarding Charles eight Grammy awards, including album of the year and record of the year. The legendary musician, who died last June at age 73, won every award for which he was nominated and captured the two major awards for the first time in a six-decade career that changed the face of music. Genius Loves Company, with 2.1 million copies sold, is Charles' best-selling album.
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By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | February 27, 1998
Michael Portnoy's 15 minutes of fame lasted maybe 30 seconds.In a night marked by Girl Power, sore throats and Aretha's aria, the 40th annual Grammy Awards will also be remembered for Portnoy's unscheduled performance as the "Soy Bomb" Boy. Hired as a show extra, he crashed the stage in New York City as Grammy-winner Bob Dylan was singing "Love Sick."What the TV world saw was this string-bean of a guy dancing next to an unflappable Dylan. Monica Lewinsky could have dived onto the stage and the folk legend wouldn't have flinched.
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By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | February 26, 1998
NEW YORK -- Who said the annual Grammy Awards broadcast only serves up the expected?That certainly wasn't the case last night. In an evening that mixed predictable victories with surprising upsets, Paula Cole bested million-sellers Hanson and Sean "Puffy" Combs in the Best New Artist category, while Shawn Colvin's hit "Sunny Came Home" was named Song and Record of the Year.In an award that echoed many critics' polls, Bob Dylan's "Time Out of Mind" was named Album of the Year. "Everybody worked extra special hard, even the musicians," Dylan joked.
NEWS
By Louis Balsamo | February 5, 2014
If I had to distill into one image the experience of growing up gay in America, it would be that of the angry right-wing protester brandishing a handmade sign with "GOD HATES FAGS!" menacingly scrawled across it in capital letters. I was born in 1960, and in my 53 years, I've had the unfortunate opportunity to see some version of this image countless times in the media. As a gay teen still years away from my first kiss, I was not buying it. Ironically, religion saved me. I didn't know who that God was, but he wasn't mine.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | January 7, 1998
NEW YORK -- On the charts, 1997 was mostly kid stuff, all fluff, silliness and sentimentality.But at the Grammys, 1997 turns out to have been a very grown-up year, indeed. When nominations for the 40th Annual Grammy Awards were announced in New York yesterday, the major categories -- Record of the Year, Album of the Year, Song of the Year and Best New Artist -- were dominated by adult pop acts, including Paula Cole, R. Kelly, Shawn Colvin, Bob Dylan and Babyface.Cole, in fact, was named in all four categories.
BUSINESS
February 11, 2013
Welcome to Mardi Gras week. Even on a Monday, Internet users have plenty to gawk at as New Orleans avoids allowing a celebration to get in the way of a shooting, the Pope resigns for theĀ  first time since the Middle Ages, and Jack White brings down (maybe) the wrath of the FCC. Don't worry, though: A kind soul has drawn Calvin and Hobbes into real-life scenes, giving us an escape hatch into a fantasy world of talking tigers. A roundup of popular topics: || TRENDING ONLINE || Pope Benedict XVI , #Pope (Google Plus, Twitter)
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | February 13, 2012
(UPDATES with final figures and total tune-in through the telecast.) The CBS telecast of the 54th Grammy Awards Sunday was seen by an average audience of 39.91 million viewers, according to Nielsen ratrings released by the network. That's the second largest Grammy average audience in history and the largest audience for the music awards show since 1984. In 1984, TV was on another planet in a pre-fragmented media galaxy. In today's media world, the audience the Grammys drew is huge.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | September 14, 2009
Guy Graham Babylon, a Grammy Award-winning musician and former New Windsor resident, who was a keyboardist with Elton John's band for more than 20 years, died of arrhythmia Sept. 2 at Los Robles Hospital & Medical Center in Thousand Oaks, Calif. He was 52. Mr. Babylon, who had been a member of the North Baltimore Aquatic Club when in high school and still enjoyed competitive swimming, was stricken while swimming and was pronounced dead later at the nearby hospital. Elton John, who was unable to attend Mr. Babylon's funeral that was held Sept.
NEWS
By FROM SUN NEWS SERVICES | February 10, 2009
Chris Brown is out on bail - and out of Doublemint ad campaign for now Los Angeles authorities are continuing to investigate what took place between R&B singer Chris Brown, one of the biggest-selling performers in pop music, and his girlfriend, pop singer Rihanna, after the pair were seen enjoying themselves at the annual pre-Grammy party hosted by Clive Davis. Both singers were scheduled to perform at Sunday night's Grammy Awards but did not appear. Instead, Brown, 19, was being booked on suspicion of making a criminal threat stemming from an assault on Rihanna, 20, according to the Los Angeles Times.
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By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | February 11, 2008
She was a continent away, but that didn't stop troubled British soul-singer Amy Winehouse from being the main attraction at last night's Grammy Awards as she took home five awards, including best new artist. But the singer herself struggled to live up to the preshow hype as the visibly jumpy 24-year-old labored through shaky but stirring performances of "You Know I'm No Good" and her signature smash "Rehab." In a towering rose-accented beehive and a black ruffled minidress, she hit a few ragged notes before a supportive audience in a London club.
NEWS
By RASHOD D. OLLISON | February 10, 2008
She generated almost deafening buzz last year, but industry insiders, pop culture bloggers and pop music fans weren't just going on about Amy Winehouse's music. Sure, her sound -- a self-consciously retro blend of vintage Motown beats and punchy Stax horns overlaid with wry, self-penned lyrics -- stood out. It was all showcased on Back to Black, the British star's American debut, which is up for the album of the year award on tonight's 50th Annual Grammy Awards show. Behind Kanye West, who leads with eight nominations, the blue-eyed soul sensation is up for six shiny gramophones, including record and song of the year for her ironic hit "Rehab."
NEWS
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | February 11, 2007
YOU KNOW THE Grammys are on shaky ground when viewers would rather watch pitch-challenged amateurs on American Idol than multi-platinum, even legendary superstars. With recent ratings shrinking, the event advertised as "Music's Biggest Night" has become progressively smaller. The 49th annual Grammy Awards, airing live tonight, face myriad struggles: infinite audience fragmentation, competition from a glut of televised celebrity spectacles and the over-saturation of a pop culture whose disposability rivals Kleenex.
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By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | February 29, 1996
You oughta know who was the big winner at the Grammy Awards last night.Although Seal dominated the major categories, winning both Record and Song of the Year, it was Alanis Morissette who took home the most trophies: Album of the Year, Female Rock Vocal Performance, Best Rock Album and Best Rock Song. Hootie & the Blowfish were named Best New Artist.It would be an understatement to say that Morissette's work is not typical Grammy fare. As host Ellen DeGeneres said after "Jagged Little Pill" was named Album of the Year, "I really couldn't imagine going to my parents and playing that song for them.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Matthew Hay Brown,Sun Reporter | June 3, 2007
THE POLITICAL SCIENTIST LANGDON WINNER HAPpened to be driving across the country in June 1967 -- just days after the Beatles released Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band. "In each city where I stopped for gas or food -- Laramie, Ogallala, Moline, South Bend -- the melodies wafted in from some far-off transistor radio or portable hi-fi," he would write. "For a brief while, the irreparably fragmented consciousness of the West was unified, at least in the minds of the young." Forty years later, former Beatle Paul McCartney will attempt to re-create that spirit on Tuesday, when Starbucks hosts a 24-hour "worldwide listening party" with his new CD, Memory Almost Full, set on repeat at more than 10,000 locations in 29 countries.
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By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | February 12, 2007
The Dixie Chicks may not have been ready to make nice, but last night, band members showed they weren't above gloating -- at least a little -- as they accepted five honors at the 49th annual Grammy Awards, including record of the year, song of the year and best album. The super-trio was snubbed by many country fans and radio stations after lead singer Natalie Maines made disparaging comments in 2003 about President Bush. Taking the Long Way, last night's winning album, was ignored by the Country Music Association at its November awards ceremony.
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