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By Chuck Philips and Chuck Philips,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 1, 2002
It was a quiet, little-known record producer from Nashville, Tenn., who united the Grammy board to oust powerful chief C. Michael Greene. Grammy chairman Garth Fundis had been among Greene's strongest supporters until this month, when he decided to call an emergency board meeting to address sexual harassment allegations against the embattled Grammy president. The behind-the-scenes battle ended Saturday when Greene resigned with an $8 million severance buyout approved by 38 trustees who had flown in from 12 chapters across the nation to attend the unprecedented meeting.
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Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
Aaron Walker's T-shirt caught singer-songwriter Norah Jones' attention in Towson on Thursday morning. It reads, "Keep calm have a cupcake. " So she did just that, according to Christine Richardson, owner of the Iced Gems cupcake truck and Reisterstown bakery of the same name. The above photo of the nine-time Grammy winner and Walker was taken after her purchase. Jones - who was in town for a "Live Lunch" performance at WTMD's studio before her group, Puss N Boots, plays the Ottobar tonight - ordered a dozen cupcakes, Richardson said, and she told Walker her favorite was the Coconut Dream cupcake.
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By Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | January 23, 2014
Maysa Leak refused to get her hopes up on Grammy nomination night last month. Besides, it was already a celebration of a different kind; she threw her son 14-year-old Jazz a birthday party.  But at around 9 p.m., as she cleaned the kitchen and Jazz played video games with his friends, she received the call that she had waited 22 years to receive. On Dec. 6, Wendi Cherry, the executive director of The Recording Academy's D.C. Chapter, called Maysa to tell her she had earned her first Grammy nomination ever.
NEWS
By Louis Balsamo | February 5, 2014
If I had to distill into one image the experience of growing up gay in America, it would be that of the angry right-wing protester brandishing a handmade sign with "GOD HATES FAGS!" menacingly scrawled across it in capital letters. I was born in 1960, and in my 53 years, I've had the unfortunate opportunity to see some version of this image countless times in the media. As a gay teen still years away from my first kiss, I was not buying it. Ironically, religion saved me. I didn't know who that God was, but he wasn't mine.
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By Los Angeles Daily News | February 21, 1993
Though the Grammy Awards treat music as an influential force, it's mostly fun and games for jokester Garry Shandling, host of the ceremony for a third time."
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By Michael Saunders and Michael Saunders,The Boston Globe | February 11, 1994
It has been a bitter winter, but that doesn't explain why music industry experts who select Grammy Awards seemed to hibernate when asked to choose 1993's best rock singing by women. When the Grammys are awarded March 1, broadcast to millions of homes worldwide, there will be no presentation for Best Rock Vocal Performance, Female.The National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences (NARAS), which oversees the Grammys, decided to merge the male and female rock vocal categories because academy voters could not find enough female nominees.
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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | February 26, 1993
When the late Andrew Schenck won a Grammy Wednesday night, it was typical that scarcely anyone noticed his name.Schenck, who died of cancer a year ago, won for his world premiere recording on the Koch label of Samuel Barber's "The Lovers." The prize was awarded for Contemporary Composition. Good as it is and deserving as it is, however, "The Lovers" is hardly a new work. That anyone knows about it -- that it got recorded at all -- is what Schenck was all about."The Lovers" was written 23 years ago and Barber, by that point, had been written off by most of the classical music establishment.
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By N.Y. Times News Service | December 5, 1990
NEW YORK -- The 1989 Grammy award for best new artist, which had been given to Milli Vanilli and which was rescinded last month when the pop duo admitted that it had not sung on its album or at concerts, will go to no one."The Grammy is not like an athletic competition," Michael Greene, president of the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences, said yesterday in a telephone interview after the decision was announced."The voting is not intended to produce a rank result. Had Milli Vanilli been moved from the initial voting, the results for the other four acts would probably have been quite different."
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By Chuck Philips and Chuck Philips,Los Angeles Times | November 19, 1990
MILLI VANILLI'S Robert Pilatus and Fabrice Morvan intend to give back their 1989 best new artist Grammy to the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences at a press conference in Hollywood tomorrow."
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By David Hinckley and David Hinckley,New York Daily News | February 19, 1991
There can be no question on one point about tomorrow night's Grammy Awards show: The most powerful music being honored will be that of the past, with Marian Anderson, Bob Dylan, the late John Lennon and Kitty Wells receiving Lifetime Achievement Awards.Plans have been drawn for an on-air tribute to Dylan, who is expected to attend. Very little about Dylan ever goes according to someone else's plan, so no specific information has been released.What may help encourage his appearance is the fact his record company will be issuing a triple-CD set of previously unreleased recordings on March 26. Though these are expected to be mostly material that has circulated on bootlegs in the past, the Grammy show does provide a promotional opportunity.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | January 27, 2014
Scrolling through the classical winners of the 2014 Grammys, I was struck by the tilt toward the contemporary, or at least off-the-well-worn-path repertoire. I have no penetrating insight into this. I don't even know if it's a trend in recent years, since I rarely remember who wins and I'm too lazy to go back and look at the archives. But this year's list of winners seems pretty cool. The most old-time, mainstream music to get the nod was in the Best Orchestral Performance category, won by the Minnesota Orchestra for its highly valued recordings on BIS Records of the First Symphony and the much less frequently encountered Fourth Symphony by Sibelius with conductor Osmo Vanska.
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By Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | January 23, 2014
Maysa Leak refused to get her hopes up on Grammy nomination night last month. Besides, it was already a celebration of a different kind; she threw her son 14-year-old Jazz a birthday party.  But at around 9 p.m., as she cleaned the kitchen and Jazz played video games with his friends, she received the call that she had waited 22 years to receive. On Dec. 6, Wendi Cherry, the executive director of The Recording Academy's D.C. Chapter, called Maysa to tell her she had earned her first Grammy nomination ever.
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By Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | January 21, 2014
Last June, R&B veteran Maysa Leak, of Gwynn Oak, was still waiting for the recognition she believed she was owed.  "The [Grammy] nomination is what I'm going after. My music has deserved that for so long. I don't know why it hasn't achieved that," she told me, not sounding angry but genuinely surprised. The wait, which began more than 20 years ago, ends on Sunday night, when Maysa will celebrate her first Grammy nomination. She's competing in the "best traditional R&B performance" category with her song "Quiet Fire" from 2013's "Blue Velvet Soul" album.  Maysa isn't the city's only connection to this year's Grammys.
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By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2013
The fourth of July is the only time of year Andrew Dost requests off from his job. Each year with his family, Dost - the multi-instrumentalist for the pop trio fun. - celebrates the holiday with a multi-day event full of reunions, games, food and fun. "Our manager knows that's off limits," Dost said. He tried anyway. With some timidity in his voice, the manager approached Dost about a special gig: fun. had been asked to perform on the White House lawn. Dost's plans quickly changed.
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By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2013
Maysa Leak had always heard music in her head. But when the 46-year-old soul singer from Gwynn Oak lost her mother to Leukemia last summer, the music stopped. For the first time she could ever recall, the artist simply known as Maysa heard nothing. "I couldn't even hear melodies," Maysa said recently. "It was so strange. " Normally, Maysa - a Morgan State alumna who got her start singing backup to Stevie Wonder and later became the featured singer of the jazz-fusion group Incognito - used music to get through tough patches.
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By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2013
Country singer Carrie Underwood will replace Faith Hill this fall in singing "Waiting All Day for Sunday Night," the anthem of NBC's top-rated weekly football telecast. The Sunday night broadcast, which averaged an audience of 21.8 million to become prime-time TV's highest rated show, is one the most skillfully and carefully packaged events in popular culture. "It's going to be the same song, same lyrics, but it's going to be with my flair," the Grammy-Award-winning singer said in a teleconference Tuesday.
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By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | November 6, 2002
Going into this year's Grammy Awards, India.Arie felt on top of the world. Her debut album, Acoustic Soul, had earned her a stunning seven nominations -- more than U2 or Alicia Keys -- and her straight-talking lyrics about self-love and appreciating dark skin had made songs such as "Video" and "Brown Skin" popular anthems for millions of women and African-Americans. But on Grammy night in February, Keys ended up being the darling, leaving with five awards while Arie won nothing. Instead of wallowing, Arie picked herself up, dusted off the bitterness and embarked on a journey of re-evaluation, introspection and heartfelt songwriting.
FEATURES
By GEOFF BOUCHER and GEOFF BOUCHER,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 9, 2005
Daring rapper Kanye West, veteran diva Mariah Carey and soulful newcomer John Legend led the way yesterday with eight nominations each for the 48th annual Grammy Awards, an acknowledgment of the powerful confluence of hip-hop and R&B as the sound of pop music in 2005. Not only is West's Late Registration nominated for album of the year and his hit "Gold Digger" nominated as record of the year, he saw his protege, Legend, earn a spot in the best new artist race for his debut album Get Lifted.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Colleen Jaskot, For The Baltimore Sun | February 27, 2013
Gregg Karukas was sitting in his car, waiting to meet someone, watching the afternoon Grammy awards ceremony stream on his iPhone for about 10 minutes, when he found out he won. Karukas, a Maryland native who will return to the area for a show in March, produced, co-wrote and arranged Omar Akram's album "Echoes of Love," which won Best New Age Album at the 55th Grammy Awards on Feb. 10. Since he didn't attend the ceremony, his immediate reaction...
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By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2013
Baltimore native Otis "Damon" Harris, a one-time member of the legendary Motown act The Temptations, died on Monday after losing a 14-year-long battle to prostate cancer, according to family spokesman Chuck Woodson. Harris was 62. Harris, a resident of Owings Mills, died at the Joseph Richey Hospice in Seton Hill. Woodson said he was in remission until three years ago. The cancer had "gotten pretty bad" by the end of last summer, Woodson said, leaving Harris in the hospital from November until last week, when he was transferred to the hospice.
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