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NEWS
October 29, 2001
Every week, the French humanitarian organization ACTED distributes food in the Afghan town of Khwaja Bahauddin, about 100 miles east of Mazar-e Sharif. Every week, more refugees line up, anxiously looking at each 100-pound bag of wheat, hoping they will get some. As each bag is handed out, young girls rush up, sweeping through the thick dust to pick up every grain that might be spilled. The refugees have fled Taliban-held areas, seeking safety and food in this drought-stricken region controlled by the opposition Northern Alliance.
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FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard and For The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
Matt Nickasch's home is anything but typical - he lives in the tower of a repurposed grain silo in Locust Point. His condo on the 18th floor is marked as a "bin" instead of a unit, a nod to industrial days long gone. "I've always been a fan of historic reuse," said the 27-year old technical consultant for the federal government. "From the historical artifacts of the 1920s structure to all of the modern conveniences and amenities, I feel that it provides the best of all worlds - old and new. " There was, indeed, a former life for Silo Point as a grain terminal for the B&O Railroad - once considered the fastest grain elevator in the world.
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NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,Sun reporter | February 13, 2008
The Complete Whole Grains Cookbook By Judith Finlayson Betty Crocker Whole Grains Easy Everyday Recipes Wiley Publishing / 2007 / $19.95 This is a practical book that would be particularly useful to a novice cook who's trying to eat better. Pluses include a user-friendly explanation of how to decipher information about grains on supermarket labels; nutritional information with each recipe; and a heading that tells you how many whole-grain servings are in a serving of each recipe. The Savory Millet and Potato Stew we tried made a quick, basic, one-pot meal that was very low in fat. kate.
NEWS
By Michelle Minton | July 30, 2014
This month, Maryland banned high-proof liquors like Everclear and other inexpensive tipples . Self-proclaimed public health activists claimed such "high octane" liquors increased the likelihood of binge-drinking and sexual assaults on college campuses. While the merits of the ban are debatable, one aspect of it is not: the use of taxpayer money to support a political agenda.   The "grain alcohol ban" was backed by the Maryland Collaborative to Reduce College Drinking and Related Problems, a coalition of researchers and administrators at 10 Maryland colleges and universities.
FEATURES
By Dr. Gabe Mirkin and Dr. Gabe Mirkin,Contributing Writer United Feature Syndicate | May 18, 1993
Athletes and exercisers on low-fat diets should eat lots of whole grains to help them to recover faster from their workouts.Athletic training is done by stressing and recovering. On one day, you exercise vigorously and your muscle fibers are damaged. On the next day, your muscles feel sore, so you should exercise at a low intensity until the soreness disappears. Every hard workout should be followed by one or more easy ones.Your muscles require large amounts of oxygen for the chemical reactions that provide energy during exercise.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | September 2, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Much of the U.S. food aid going to famine-ravaged Somalia is corn and sorghum, which were chosen because they are less likely to be stolen by roving bands of armed thugs because Somalis don't much like them, according to President Bush's aid coordinator.Andrew Natsios, assistant administrator of the Agency for International Development, said yesterday that the grains are ideal for free food distribution because they are nutritious enough to alleviate hunger but are not popular enough to command high black market prices.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Sun Staff Writer | April 20, 1994
When grains -- breads, cereals, rice and pasta -- moved from the back of the breakfast table to star billing as the foundation of the new food-guide pyramid a couple of years ago, some people were pretty startled.2 Whisk all ingredients in a bowl until blended.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 2013
When some folks want to take a trip back in time, they read a book. Jonathan Yoke, a 25-year-old engineer, straps on a pair of tights and becomes Alfonso d'Este Duca di Ferrara. As an actor in the annual Maryland Renaissance Festival, Yoke will perform as that 16th-century Italian nobleman and as Orlando, a knight in Charlemagne's service. (The fest runs weekends, Saturday through Oct. 20, at 1821 Crownsville Road, Annapolis; tickets $8-$22; 410-266-7304 or rennfest.com.) The Butchers Hill resident has been acting since his sophomore year of college, when he appeared in Shakespeare's "Titus Andronicus.
NEWS
By JONATHAN D. ROCKOFF and JONATHAN D. ROCKOFF,SUN REPORTER | February 16, 2006
WASHINGTON -- The Food and Drug Administration proposed yesterday a definition for "whole grains" and labeling that would detail the quantity of the ingredient in breads, cereals and other foods to help consumers figure out what they're eating. When the federal government encouraged Americans to eat whole grains last year, it didn't tell them what a whole grain was or give them help determining whether they were eating the recommended 3-ounce daily allowance. That left it to manufacturers of breads, cereals and other foods to decide whether their ingredients were whole grains and to label their products with claims saying they were "excellent" or "good" sources.
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 29, 2004
White bread, a mainstay of the American diet since at least the 1930s, is under attack. The Department of Agriculture is considering recommending that consumers drastically cut their consumption of fortified grains. They are used to enrich a wide variety of food products - particularly white bread, which is made from refined white flour. The refined grains sector already has been battered by the popularity of low-carbohydrate diets. White bread came under additional fire from a recent study released by Tufts University in Boston that links the consumption of such bread to wider waistlines.
NEWS
By Danae King, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2014
Maryland joins at least a dozen other states Tuesday in banning the sale of 190-proof grain alcohol, a measure that lawmakers hope will help to reduce sexual assaults and binge drinking among college students. The bill is one of more than 200 that go into effect Tuesday; other bills expand the earned income tax credit for low-income residents and exempt more wealthy Marylanders from the estate tax, overhaul Baltimore City liquor board practices and establish incentives to encourage investment in research universities.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2014
Grain alcohol would be outlawed in Maryland under a bill that passed the House Thursday. The vote was 103-30. Similar legislation has already passed the Senate. It would bar retail sales of any drink that's 190-proof or more, containing at least 95 percent alcohol. The ban was sought by the state's university presidents, who were seeking to curb binge drinking on campus. Pennsylvania, Virginia and West Virginia already ban grain alcohol.
NEWS
By Jonathan Gibralter | February 11, 2014
As I listened to the conversation in the Maryland Senate regarding the bill to ban extremely high alcohol content beverages (SB-75), one argument said a ban would fail, and we should instead focus on educating our students. Well, incoming freshmen at Frostburg State University don't wait long before their education on the dangers of high-risk drinking begins. I start talking about it at the very first summer orientation session, and we keep telling parents and students about high-risk drinking and its consequences throughout.
NEWS
February 7, 2014
It is about time university presidents took an interest in college drinking ( "Grain alcohol target of ban," Feb. 6), but why target grain alcohol instead of college drinking? It has been allowed to go on for far too long and, as a '60s college graduate, I have always been appalled at the laxness on today's campuses. As I told my son when he was in college, you are an adult and get adult responsibilities and privileges when you can pay the bills and clean up the mistakes. And yes, as a parent I took responsibility for alcohol education, and at home he was allowed as a late teenager to "taste" the infrequent wine or beer when guests were there, and he was taught the dangers of irresponsible drinking.
NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | February 5, 2014
Maryland senators voted Wednesday to outlaw sales of the clear, potent booze that's been a staple at college parties. The move comes after a push from Maryland university presidents who say grain-alcohol, which is 95 percent pure, contributes to a dangerous culture of binge drinking. The 190-proof liquor is sold under several brands and sometimes is marketed as "moonshine," but is often known by the most popular brand name, Everclear.  "This is a small step we can do to improve to safety," said Sen. Richard Madaleno of Montgomery County, a Democrat who sponsored the bill at the request of college presidents.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, Carrie Wells and Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | February 5, 2014
Grain alcohol, the cheap, potent booze that has been a staple at college parties for generations, could be outlawed in Maryland as university presidents press lawmakers to ban it. Maryland senators voted Wednesday to forbid the sale of grain alcohol that's at least 190-proof, which contains 95 percent alcohol. A key committee chairman expects to move the bill to the full House of Delegates for a vote, giving the bill its best shot at passage in years. Sometimes marketed as moonshine, colorless grain alcohol can be twice as strong as vodka and has been outlawed in at least a dozen other states.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dennis O'Brien and Dan Thanh Dang and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | September 23, 2004
Chomping on cheeseburgers and french fries at the Towson Town Center food court, Erin Fink and Andrew Rudell don't worry about a balanced diet. The friends even joke that their favorite meal provides at least four of the five major food groups: meat, dairy, grains and, yes, even vegetables - if you count the lettuce leaf and tomato slice under the burger. "People will do what they want to do," Fink says. "So I eat what I want to eat. We have no idea what's good for you and what's not anymore.
FEATURES
By Joanne E. Morvay | August 26, 1998
* Item: Near East Creative Grains* What you get: 2 1/2 servings* Cost: About $2* Preparation time: 25 to 30 minutes* Review: I couldn't think of a better name for this new blend of brown rice and specialty grains like pearled wheat and barley. Creative Grains offers a welcome alternative to the boring old rice or potatoes routine. We tried the Chicken & Herbs and the Roasted Garlic mixes. I added fresh mushrooms and peas to the chicken flavor. Fresh tomato and chopped scallions gave some extra verve to the roasted garlic grains.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | February 4, 2014
Maryland senators will resume debate Wednesday on whether to outlaw the sale of grain alcohol, a colorless spirit so potent the chamber voted to ban it twice before. More than a dozen other states already forbid the sale of the 190-proof liquor, according to state analysts. The proposal has died in the House of Delegates in the past, but was revived with a new lawmakers pushing it this year. On Tuesday, the Senate took up the question of whether its prevalence on college campuses contributed to alcohol poisoning, and whether banning it would hurt small businesses that sell it. Democrat Sen. Rich Madaleno of Montgomery County said the president of Frostburg State University asked him to introduce the bill to ban substance, which is nearly pure alcohol, because of the problems it creates at colleges.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 2013
When some folks want to take a trip back in time, they read a book. Jonathan Yoke, a 25-year-old engineer, straps on a pair of tights and becomes Alfonso d'Este Duca di Ferrara. As an actor in the annual Maryland Renaissance Festival, Yoke will perform as that 16th-century Italian nobleman and as Orlando, a knight in Charlemagne's service. (The fest runs weekends, Saturday through Oct. 20, at 1821 Crownsville Road, Annapolis; tickets $8-$22; 410-266-7304 or rennfest.com.) The Butchers Hill resident has been acting since his sophomore year of college, when he appeared in Shakespeare's "Titus Andronicus.
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