Advertisement
HomeCollectionsGrain Elevator
IN THE NEWS

Grain Elevator

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Antero Pietila and Antero Pietila,SUN STAFF | May 21, 2004
A $200 million conversion of a former Locust Point grain elevator into an upscale, mixed-use development won an important city approval yesterday, prompting talk that construction will start in the fall. The Planning Commission gave its unanimous backing to the proposal to rezone 15 acres west of Fort McHenry for the redevelopment. "This is probably a three- to five-year plan," Mark Sapperstein, one of the developers of the project called Silo Point, told the commission. He said interior demolition is going on at the site.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 17, 2010
Penn Station's man/woman sculpture needed to finally shift weight as his/her legs were killing him/her. The cap on the gulf oil well left the rest of the country feeling bloated. The obesity epidemic really is getting out of hand. U.S. Department of Treasury IOU landslide. Senate passage of Wall Street reforms resulted in a sudden drop in CEO bonuses. Either Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. or Martin O'Malley said something nice about his opponent in the governor's race.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | August 23, 2004
Baltimore's newest landmark is an elevator. But not just any elevator. The Commission for Historical and Architectural Preservation voted this month to nominate the former Baltimore & Ohio Locust Point Grain Terminal Elevator for listing on the National Register of Historic Places. It's part of a trend in which industrial buildings are increasingly being recognized for their historical and architectural significance. "We've listed industrial buildings in the past, both locally and nationally," said city planner Brigitte Fessenden.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,Sun reporter | June 23, 2008
For most of the 45 years that Colleen Rosenbach has lived in Locust Point, her neighbor was a hulking grain elevator that coated her cars and windows with brown dust. Now, that silo is being turned into upscale condominiums. "I don't like either one," said Rosenbach, 70. "But at least you knew what to expect with the grain elevator." In a place where houses are passed down through generations and neighbors like to sit on their steps and chat on lazy afternoons, development has been met cautiously.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 20, 1998
WICHITA, Kan. -- The June 8 explosions that killed seven people at the DeBruce Grain elevator started in a tunnel when a bearing on a conveyor belt apparently locked up, according to an expert investigating the incident.That set off a chain of events that produced heat to ignite highly explosive grain dust, said Vernon Grose, one of six experts hired by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration.The initial blast set off explosions that continued throughout the elevator, killing seven people dead and injuring nine.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | September 12, 2005
What would Silo Point be without its silos? That's the question now under consideration by local architects planning to convert a huge grain elevator complex in Locust Point to a 218-unit condominium development called Silo Point. The 297-foot-tall grain elevator, visible from many parts of the city, dates from 1923. It ceased operating in 2002, after part of the state-owned pier that linked it to the waterfront fell into the harbor. It is targeted for conversion to upscale residences as part of a $400 million "planned unit development" that also includes 121 luxury townhouses, commercial space and parking for more than 500 cars.
NEWS
By Antero Pietila and Antero Pietila,SUN STAFF | January 9, 2004
The city's design arbiters gave the go-ahead yesterday to a plan that would convert an old grain elevator complex near Fort McHenry into a $250 million development with luxury condominiums and offices. "Conceptually we are in agreement with what you have done," said Mario Schack, speaking for the Design Advisory Panel, after an architect theatrically unveiled a scale model of the Silo Point redevelopment project. The mock-up showed the 297-foot-tall grain elevator transformed into a glass-topped condominium tower - or, perhaps, a hotel.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | May 4, 2002
The dispute over who should pay for repairs to reopen the port of Baltimore's only grain elevator - a facility considered critical to Central Maryland farm economy - might be decided by the courts, a top port official said yesterday. James J. White, executive director of the Maryland Port Administration, said the MPA asked Baltimore Circuit Court on March 28 to deny a request by ADM/Countrymark Inc. that the state pay $6 million for lost business and submit to arbitration the question of who pays for repairs.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | December 13, 2001
The state and Archer Daniels Midland Co. are close to reaching an agreement to repair the port of Baltimore's only grain elevator - a facility that once accounted for nearly 20 percent of the port's exports and is critical to Maryland's farm economy - a top Agriculture Department official said yesterday. When the North Locust Point facility was closed by storm damage in June, it marked the first time in a century that ships hauling grain did not call on Baltimore. Bradley H. Powers, deputy agriculture secretary, told members of the Maryland Agricultural Commission yesterday that the Port Administration and ADM are negotiating a plan that would repair the elevator rather than replace it. "Things are looking up," he told the board, an advisory group to the governor and state agriculture secretary.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | May 5, 2003
IS WATERFRONT real estate so hot in Baltimore that people are willing to live and work in an old grain elevator? Developer Patrick Turner and his partners are counting on it. They plan to convert the former Baltimore & Ohio Grain Elevator, a Locust Point landmark, to luxury condominiums, offices and possibly a hotel by 2005. The conversion, called Silo Point, would be the anchor of a $200 million mixed-use community that also would include about 135 low-rise residences on 7.5 acres just west of Fort McHenry.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | July 28, 2007
It didn't take me long to find Key Highway's new extension. The joggers and the cyclists have discovered this important stretch of the well-known South Baltimore thoroughfare that is not yet open to traffic. Watch out when the barriers come down. A smooth ribbon of asphalt now wraps around the backside of a once-industrial Locust Point neighborhood. In only a few years, it has become a land of amazing new houses and stylish, glassy apartments.
BUSINESS
By Lorriane Mirabella and Lorriane Mirabella,Sun Reporter | November 5, 2006
It's a giant slab of mud-colored concrete jutting nearly 300 feet into the sky at the edge of a peninsula, an old, abandoned plant that once stored and weighed tons of grain hauled in by rail. Or, as architect Christopher Pfaeffle sees the former Archer Daniels Midland grain elevator in Locust Point - with a few modifications - it's the perfect place to watch the sun set from the living room of your penthouse. Pfaeffle's firm has taken on the task of turning an 83-year-old grain elevator into sleek, upscale condos.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | September 12, 2005
What would Silo Point be without its silos? That's the question now under consideration by local architects planning to convert a huge grain elevator complex in Locust Point to a 218-unit condominium development called Silo Point. The 297-foot-tall grain elevator, visible from many parts of the city, dates from 1923. It ceased operating in 2002, after part of the state-owned pier that linked it to the waterfront fell into the harbor. It is targeted for conversion to upscale residences as part of a $400 million "planned unit development" that also includes 121 luxury townhouses, commercial space and parking for more than 500 cars.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson | May 20, 2005
ATWOOD COLLINS III will risk health, limb and even life to do his job at M&T Bank. One cold, rainy morning, Collins, 58, climbed to the top of a 20-story grain elevator on slippery metal stairs amid demolition crews and 100-foot-deep pits to see if the bank should finance a project to turn the building into luxury condos. "The view was just spectacular," said Collins, who noted that another colleague made the trip reluctantly but was too nervous to make the climb. Another time, shortly after Collins moved to Baltimore from Connecticut to oversee M&T's acquisition of Allfirst, he promised to meet as many employees as he could.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | August 23, 2004
Baltimore's newest landmark is an elevator. But not just any elevator. The Commission for Historical and Architectural Preservation voted this month to nominate the former Baltimore & Ohio Locust Point Grain Terminal Elevator for listing on the National Register of Historic Places. It's part of a trend in which industrial buildings are increasingly being recognized for their historical and architectural significance. "We've listed industrial buildings in the past, both locally and nationally," said city planner Brigitte Fessenden.
NEWS
By Antero Pietila and Antero Pietila,SUN STAFF | May 21, 2004
A $200 million conversion of a former Locust Point grain elevator into an upscale, mixed-use development won an important city approval yesterday, prompting talk that construction will start in the fall. The Planning Commission gave its unanimous backing to the proposal to rezone 15 acres west of Fort McHenry for the redevelopment. "This is probably a three- to five-year plan," Mark Sapperstein, one of the developers of the project called Silo Point, told the commission. He said interior demolition is going on at the site.
NEWS
July 17, 2010
Penn Station's man/woman sculpture needed to finally shift weight as his/her legs were killing him/her. The cap on the gulf oil well left the rest of the country feeling bloated. The obesity epidemic really is getting out of hand. U.S. Department of Treasury IOU landslide. Senate passage of Wall Street reforms resulted in a sudden drop in CEO bonuses. Either Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. or Martin O'Malley said something nice about his opponent in the governor's race.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,Sun reporter | June 23, 2008
For most of the 45 years that Colleen Rosenbach has lived in Locust Point, her neighbor was a hulking grain elevator that coated her cars and windows with brown dust. Now, that silo is being turned into upscale condominiums. "I don't like either one," said Rosenbach, 70. "But at least you knew what to expect with the grain elevator." In a place where houses are passed down through generations and neighbors like to sit on their steps and chat on lazy afternoons, development has been met cautiously.
NEWS
By Antero Pietila and Antero Pietila,SUN STAFF | January 9, 2004
The city's design arbiters gave the go-ahead yesterday to a plan that would convert an old grain elevator complex near Fort McHenry into a $250 million development with luxury condominiums and offices. "Conceptually we are in agreement with what you have done," said Mario Schack, speaking for the Design Advisory Panel, after an architect theatrically unveiled a scale model of the Silo Point redevelopment project. The mock-up showed the 297-foot-tall grain elevator transformed into a glass-topped condominium tower - or, perhaps, a hotel.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | May 5, 2003
IS WATERFRONT real estate so hot in Baltimore that people are willing to live and work in an old grain elevator? Developer Patrick Turner and his partners are counting on it. They plan to convert the former Baltimore & Ohio Grain Elevator, a Locust Point landmark, to luxury condominiums, offices and possibly a hotel by 2005. The conversion, called Silo Point, would be the anchor of a $200 million mixed-use community that also would include about 135 low-rise residences on 7.5 acres just west of Fort McHenry.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.