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Graham Greene

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NEWS
April 5, 1991
Like Shakespeare, Graham Greene tried first to entertain the crowd, to feed his family and pay the bills. Any profundity he might have harbored, any rumination on evil and guilt and forgiveness and sin, any outrage with power and its abuse, any sense of human failure, flowed from that.This ambiguity of popular and literary intent undoubtedly denied the incredibly durable English novelist the Nobel Prize for Literature. It just as certainly insured for him a place in the enduring body of important literature that will be denied some who won that prize on the road to obscurity.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2010
It's not surprising that Graham Greene's colorful, witty 1969 novel "Travels with My Aunt," which was quickly turned into a movie, eventually found its way onto the stage as well. But there is something deliciously unexpected about the way Scottish playwright, director and actor Giles Havergal devised his theatrical adaptation of the book in 1989. Even those already in on the joke are likely to be amused all over again by Rep Stage 's finely polished, season-opening production of the play, which uses only four male actors to portray more than 25 characters — an offbeat touch in keeping with what remains a disarmingly offbeat story.
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FEATURES
By Orange County Register | April 8, 1992
Actor Graham Greene, nominated as Best Supporting Actor last year for his portrayal of an American Indian in "Dances With Wolves," is back this year in "Thunderheart," which opened last week.But Mr. Greene, a Canadian member of the Oneida Nation, has been typecast so often in the movies that he said he's getting tired of playing Indians."I feel like a gimmick in every script that's sent to me," he said recently. "It seems that every time writers get together to write a script, they've got to drag this Native issue with them.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2010
Actor Nigel Reed claims not to know why he has been tapped for the second time to play the role of Augusta, the title character and aged septuagenarian in "Travels With My Aunt. " As he observes: "It can't be because I look good in a dress. " Actually, none of the four actors who play 25 different roles in the stage version of Graham Greene's 1969 novel puts on a skirt, let alone high-heeled pumps or a wig. Traditionally, the actors wear monochromatic black and white, and the show is performed without props or a set. The role of the mild-mannered bank clerk, Henry Pulling, is divided between all four performers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2010
Actor Nigel Reed claims not to know why he has been tapped for the second time to play the role of Augusta, the title character and aged septuagenarian in "Travels With My Aunt. " As he observes: "It can't be because I look good in a dress. " Actually, none of the four actors who play 25 different roles in the stage version of Graham Greene's 1969 novel puts on a skirt, let alone high-heeled pumps or a wig. Traditionally, the actors wear monochromatic black and white, and the show is performed without props or a set. The role of the mild-mannered bank clerk, Henry Pulling, is divided between all four performers.
NEWS
By Sam Allis and Sam Allis,BOSTON GLOBE | April 17, 1999
BOSTON -- Kim Philby was the most devastating Soviet mole ever to penetrate the British secret service. Graham Greene was one of the century's great novelists and an iconoclast. Together, they forged a complicated friendship that lasted half a century and flummoxed the rest of the world.When Philby was exposed as a double agent in 1963, Greene earned the opprobrium of their native England by publicly defending Philby's treason. Greene maintained that Philby merely followed a higher morality than country -- his belief in communism.
ENTERTAINMENT
Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2010
Richard Attenborough will scare the bejesus out of you in "Brighton Rock. " Screening this week in a new print at the Charles, this film from 1947 comes off as cutting-edge as the Millennium thrillers. That's not just because the antihero's favorite weapon is a straight razor. The film brings metaphoric dimensions to mob tensions that rival those in Martin Scorsese's "Mean Streets. " And director John Boulting captures a rarely seen England — brash and vulgar — that's at once seedy and fresh.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2010
It's not surprising that Graham Greene's colorful, witty 1969 novel "Travels with My Aunt," which was quickly turned into a movie, eventually found its way onto the stage as well. But there is something deliciously unexpected about the way Scottish playwright, director and actor Giles Havergal devised his theatrical adaptation of the book in 1989. Even those already in on the joke are likely to be amused all over again by Rep Stage 's finely polished, season-opening production of the play, which uses only four male actors to portray more than 25 characters — an offbeat touch in keeping with what remains a disarmingly offbeat story.
NEWS
By Neil Baldwin and Neil Baldwin,Special to The Sun | June 4, 1995
"Graham Greene: The Enemy Within," by Michael Shelden. 454 pages. New York: Random House. $27.50William Butler Yeats asked it well: "Who can say where the work begins and the life ends?" Although Graham Greene (1904-1991) has attracted more than his share of biographers determined to reveal every nook and cranny of his perverse quotidian existence, he remains, above all inquiry, the consummate literary modernist.Greene cited Henry James and Joseph Conrad as his two most important models. At least in this singular respect, he shows an honest streak.
FEATURES
By Helene Lorber and Helene Lorber,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | May 29, 1998
If life goes by too fast for you, I know how to ratchet it down: watch "The Education of Little Tree." A time and place when life was slow inspires a movie that is slower still.The stately pace is not entirely out of place. East Tennessee never looked so beautiful. "Little Tree" celebrates its mountains in every detail, from green, fern-tangled paths to vistas of fog lying heavy in the high valleys.The characters provide scarcely more action than the fluttering leaves, yet the camera lingers on them, too. Stoic and internal mountain people that they are, they say little.
ENTERTAINMENT
Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2010
Richard Attenborough will scare the bejesus out of you in "Brighton Rock. " Screening this week in a new print at the Charles, this film from 1947 comes off as cutting-edge as the Millennium thrillers. That's not just because the antihero's favorite weapon is a straight razor. The film brings metaphoric dimensions to mob tensions that rival those in Martin Scorsese's "Mean Streets. " And director John Boulting captures a rarely seen England — brash and vulgar — that's at once seedy and fresh.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow | May 20, 2007
THE THIRD MAN -- The Criterion Collection / $39.95. SANSHO THE BAILIFF --The Criterion Collection / $39.95. Definitive is a word that critics should delete from their vocabulary. But on Tuesday the Criterion Collection releases two great films in DVD editions that must be called definitive for their luster, excitement and completeness. And the movies are magnificent. Filmed on location in the partitioned Vienna of 1949, Carol Reed's The Third Man (with a script by Graham Greene) tells a thrillingly complex and volatile story of the pain and humor involved in the getting of wisdom, especially in the explosive middle of the 20th century.
NEWS
August 6, 2004
Gloria Emerson, 75, a former correspondent for The New York Times who reported from Vietnam in the early 1970s and was known for writing about the personal impact of war on soldiers and civilians, was found dead at her Manhattan apartment Wednesday, according to her physician. She suffered from Parkinson's disease. While the cause of death awaited a medical examiner's ruling, friends said she had planned her own death and carried it out Tuesday, after leaving notes that indicated she intended suicide and comments meant for her obituary.
TOPIC
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN STAFF | February 17, 2002
"This was a land of rebellious barons. It was like Europe in the Middle Ages. But what were the Americans doing here?"- Graham Greene in The Quiet American Graham Greene was writing of Vietnam in the mid-1950s as America was poised for its heartbreaking journey into the jungles. But he could have been referring to Afghanistan, with its own rebellious barons and intrigue and potential to ensnare a great power. The United States impressively toppled the Taliban regime in Afghanistan within three months, scattered the al-Qaida terrorist network and helped to install a new interim government.
NEWS
By Eric A. Weinberger | December 24, 2001
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. - One wonders how many people, when they heard of the death of a young CIA officer in a prison revolt in Afghanistan, then saw his blunt-jawed photograph in their newspaper, thought of Pyle from The Quiet American, Graham Greene's novel of Vietnam in the 1950s, before the deluge. Pyle too was a company man, and earnest; "with his crew-cut and his wide campus gaze, he seemed incapable of harm." One is speculating, of course, about Johnny Michael Spann, 32, of Winfield, Ala., who might well have been tougher and more seasoned and not so easily led or out of his depth as poor, murdered Pyle.
NEWS
By Sam Allis and Sam Allis,BOSTON GLOBE | April 17, 1999
BOSTON -- Kim Philby was the most devastating Soviet mole ever to penetrate the British secret service. Graham Greene was one of the century's great novelists and an iconoclast. Together, they forged a complicated friendship that lasted half a century and flummoxed the rest of the world.When Philby was exposed as a double agent in 1963, Greene earned the opprobrium of their native England by publicly defending Philby's treason. Greene maintained that Philby merely followed a higher morality than country -- his belief in communism.
NEWS
By Eric A. Weinberger | December 24, 2001
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. - One wonders how many people, when they heard of the death of a young CIA officer in a prison revolt in Afghanistan, then saw his blunt-jawed photograph in their newspaper, thought of Pyle from The Quiet American, Graham Greene's novel of Vietnam in the 1950s, before the deluge. Pyle too was a company man, and earnest; "with his crew-cut and his wide campus gaze, he seemed incapable of harm." One is speculating, of course, about Johnny Michael Spann, 32, of Winfield, Ala., who might well have been tougher and more seasoned and not so easily led or out of his depth as poor, murdered Pyle.
NEWS
By Jonathan Power | December 10, 1997
LONDON -- Graham Greene's great novel, ''The Comedians,'' set in the Haiti of dictator Papa Doc, gives some support to the artist's pious hope that ''a writer is not so powerless as he usually feels, and a pen, as well as a silver bullet, can draw blood.''How else to explain how this half of a Caribbean island gets more press than it deserves? Moreover, it is, apart from Bosnia, the one area of the world that gets both a United Nations and a United States peacekeeping presence.It is in part the legacy of Graham Greene; it is partly the fascination with the lurid; but it is also, as it was for Central America in the last decade, because it is in America's own backyard, with the added issue that when the politics and economics of this impoverished ''vast wrinkled wasteland'' go wrong the people take to their boats, their rafts, their planks of wood and make for Florida.
FEATURES
By Helene Lorber and Helene Lorber,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | May 29, 1998
If life goes by too fast for you, I know how to ratchet it down: watch "The Education of Little Tree." A time and place when life was slow inspires a movie that is slower still.The stately pace is not entirely out of place. East Tennessee never looked so beautiful. "Little Tree" celebrates its mountains in every detail, from green, fern-tangled paths to vistas of fog lying heavy in the high valleys.The characters provide scarcely more action than the fluttering leaves, yet the camera lingers on them, too. Stoic and internal mountain people that they are, they say little.
NEWS
By Jonathan Power | December 10, 1997
LONDON -- Graham Greene's great novel, ''The Comedians,'' set in the Haiti of dictator Papa Doc, gives some support to the artist's pious hope that ''a writer is not so powerless as he usually feels, and a pen, as well as a silver bullet, can draw blood.''How else to explain how this half of a Caribbean island gets more press than it deserves? Moreover, it is, apart from Bosnia, the one area of the world that gets both a United Nations and a United States peacekeeping presence.It is in part the legacy of Graham Greene; it is partly the fascination with the lurid; but it is also, as it was for Central America in the last decade, because it is in America's own backyard, with the added issue that when the politics and economics of this impoverished ''vast wrinkled wasteland'' go wrong the people take to their boats, their rafts, their planks of wood and make for Florida.
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