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By Andrea F. Siegel and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 2, 2010
An Episcopal rector found graffiti spray-painted on his Annapolis church Monday afternoon, police said. The Rev. John T. Smith, rector of St. Luke's Episcopal Church in Eastport, told police that the vandalism occurred between 1 and 2 p.m. The graffiti -- a green peace symbol and a black letter E -- did not appear to be gang-related, police said.
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NEWS
Carrie Wells | August 19, 2014
"Hands up, don't shoot" has become one of the primary rallying cries for those in Ferguson, Mo., protesting the police shooting of unarmed teenager Michael Brown last week. The slogan has now spread to Baltimore, with a two part mural on the boarded-up back of a liquor store at the corner of East Preston Street and Greenmount Avenue. "Hands up" is on one level of the building, while a shadowy figure with arms raised is on a lower level. Baltimore has a significant street art scene, but it was not immediately apparent which artist was responsible for the work.
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NEWS
December 29, 2009
Yeah! Finally someone (Mary Carole McCauley) wrote about the wonderful graffiti in Baltimore ("Making their mark," Dec. 27) - especially being able to do it without breaking the law! Going back and forth to New York on the train, one can see lots of great lettering along the tracks - I've often shown this to my grandchildren, mentioning that if only someone could get these people into an art school, they would probably "bloom" and do good works. And, thanks to Sherwin Mark and Karly Fae Hansen for promoting a place where Baltimoreans and tourists can enjoy the works of these talented people.
NEWS
July 18, 2014
From Denver, Colo., I pause in shame at the unkind and un-Christian words and deeds of my fellow Americans ("Carroll's revealing 'illeagle' graffiti," July 15). Who among us is not from some other country, some other ethnicity? Pope Francis recently said it well: "These children should be welcomed and protected!" The partisan political threats are embarrassing and immature. We are a finer nation than these sentiments portray. Jean McMahon - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case and Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2012
In the middle of the infield at Preakness 2012, there are six long horizontal blackboards filled with scribbles of neon chalk. The randomness of the grafitti is appropriately light-hearted and innocuous. There's school pride (West Virginia, Virginia Tech and Ball So Hard) and shout-outs to friends who likely won't see them. And in 2012, it's just not a party without a scrawling of YOLO on the wall.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley | mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | December 27, 2009
T he Load of Fun graffiti alley isn't visible from the intersection of North Avenue and Howard Street, which is gray and beige and blighted and grim. Nearby is a nondescript motel and a check-cashing service with a barred entrance. But when visitors walk north on Howard Street and turn onto the quirkily named 19 1/2 Street, suddenly, there the alley is. People abruptly stop walking and even lean back slightly. They draw in their chins and swallow their breaths. It's almost like stepping into an ancient walled European city or an outdoor urban cathedral.
NEWS
Carrie Wells | August 19, 2014
"Hands up, don't shoot" has become one of the primary rallying cries for those in Ferguson, Mo., protesting the police shooting of unarmed teenager Michael Brown last week. The slogan has now spread to Baltimore, with a two part mural on the boarded-up back of a liquor store at the corner of East Preston Street and Greenmount Avenue. "Hands up" is on one level of the building, while a shadowy figure with arms raised is on a lower level. Baltimore has a significant street art scene, but it was not immediately apparent which artist was responsible for the work.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2013
Four places in Pikesville, including the Baltimore Hebrew Congregation and an elementary school, were tagged over the weekend with graffiti carrying swastikas, pentagrams and other vulgarities, and Baltimore County police say they are investigating the incidents as being connected. The graffiti was reported from Friday night through Sunday night, police spokeswoman Cathy Batton said Monday. Batton said police are investigating the incidents as a possible bias or hate crime, and are asking anyone with information to call 410-307-2020.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2010
Top administrators at Loyola Blakefield, the Jesuit boys school in Towson, are investigating anti-Semitic graffiti scrawled on the locker of a Jewish ninth-grader. The message was discovered late Wednesday and the school maintenance department removed it early Thursday, said Rob Robinson, a spokesman for Loyola Blakefield. Robinson would not describe the graffiti other than to say it included the word "Jew. " "It was very clear," Robinson said. He said the school is interviewing students to determine who is responsible, but police have not been notified.
NEWS
July 15, 2014
We thank the nameless graffiti artist in Carroll County who spray painted a denunciation of an aborted plan to house some of the thousands of unaccompanied minors who have crossed the southern U.S. border in recent months at a military facility near Westminster. He or she has told us all we need to know about what's driving the furor over these children. No, we're not going to harp on the first part of the message — "No illeagles here" — and claim that stupidity is at the heart of things.
NEWS
July 18, 2014
A visit to Auschwitz a few days ago really put the immigration crisis on our borders into perspective ( "Carroll's revealing 'illeagle' graffiti ," July 15). I can only wonder if Europeans escaping the Holocaust in the 1940s had the means and proximity to come to the U.S. whether we would turn them away with such ease and how we would feel decades later looking back. Its evident that despite Carroll County's numerous churches and "strong family values," the most basic human value, having a heart, is left out. It's not a Republican or Democratic issue, it's a human empathy issue.
NEWS
July 15, 2014
We thank the nameless graffiti artist in Carroll County who spray painted a denunciation of an aborted plan to house some of the thousands of unaccompanied minors who have crossed the southern U.S. border in recent months at a military facility near Westminster. He or she has told us all we need to know about what's driving the furor over these children. No, we're not going to harp on the first part of the message — "No illeagles here" — and claim that stupidity is at the heart of things.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2013
Four places in Pikesville, including the Baltimore Hebrew Congregation and an elementary school, were tagged over the weekend with graffiti carrying swastikas, pentagrams and other vulgarities, and Baltimore County police say they are investigating the incidents as being connected. The graffiti was reported from Friday night through Sunday night, police spokeswoman Cathy Batton said Monday. Batton said police are investigating the incidents as a possible bias or hate crime, and are asking anyone with information to call 410-307-2020.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case and Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2012
In the middle of the infield at Preakness 2012, there are six long horizontal blackboards filled with scribbles of neon chalk. The randomness of the grafitti is appropriately light-hearted and innocuous. There's school pride (West Virginia, Virginia Tech and Ball So Hard) and shout-outs to friends who likely won't see them. And in 2012, it's just not a party without a scrawling of YOLO on the wall.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | January 3, 2012
A fire accompanied by racial graffiti at a Brooklyn Park home early New Year's Day is being investigated as a possible hate crime, according to Anne Arundel County police and fire officials. Fire Department Lt. Cliff Kooser said the blaze at the house in the 300 block of Church Street caused an estimated $75,000 in damage, and that "it's a possibility it could be incendiary. " Kooser and police spokesman Justin Mulcahy said the graffiti was on walls and the agencies were working together to determine if it was a hate crime.
NEWS
August 22, 2011
Re: Your article in Friday's Sun paper outlining a new vision for North Avenue, a place of dereliction since the '70s ("A vision for North Avenue"). I am heartened to see and hear that there are still people in Baltimore that care about their neighborhoods, even though one would feel extremely skeptical when driving along the corridors of North Avenue in East and West Baltimore — and let's not give South Baltimore a free pass. Trash and graffiti are the first signs of decay, along with vacant properties, in any city.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | June 15, 2010
Anne Arundel County police are investigating acts of vandalism, which included racially offensive graffiti, that occurred at Arundel High School early Tuesday morning. Police were called to the school in the 1000 block of Annapolis Road in Gambrills at about 3:43 a.m. Tuesday to find trees covered in toilet paper and graffiti on the front steps and sidewalk outside the school's front entrance, as well as on benches, and several areas around the front of the school. Police said the graffiti was offensive and derogatory in nature.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | May 22, 2010
The residents of Oakenshawe awoke Oct. 28 to discover their historic North Baltimore neighborhood of Colonial-style rowhouses under attack. A bright orange squiggly line ran from bumper to bumper along the side of a pickup truck. The words "Drugs Not Hugs" was scrawled across a double garage door. A swastika had been painted on a window screen. Even a pumpkin had been defaced. In all, 30 houses and eight vehicles had been vandalized. Or decorated, depending on your point of view.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2011
The problem: Graffiti advertising bail bondsmen remained on a wall near Central Booking for weeks. The backstory: Baltimore's bail bondsmen often employ memorable marketing methods to get their names and contact information ingrained in the memory of potential customers. But some companies may have moved beyond free pens and vinyl-wrapped vehicles and into a less sanctioned medium — graffiti. Several weeks ago, Baltimore Sun business reporter and BaltTech blogger Gus Sentementes noticed phone numbers advertising bail bondsmen painted on the wall that forms the on-ramp to Interstate 83 along the west side of the Fallsway.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 3, 2011
Joggers, bikers and pedestrians will soon have a good reason not to hustle when they pass through a popular yet graffiti-covered tunnel that connects the woods on either side of busy Oakland Mills Road in Columbia. The concrete walls of the 75-foot-long underpass, built in 1974, are the unlikely canvas of Mariama Barr-Dallas, an Oakland Mills High School student who was selected to paint the pair of murals to mask graffiti there and beautify Owen Brown. "I've always liked drawing, but I only recently discovered that painting is also something I can do," the 17-year-old senior said of the 8-foot-high panels depicting nature scenes and wildlife, executed in exterior house paint colors she mixes herself.
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