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Graduation Requirements

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By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | October 30, 2013
The overwhelming majority of Maryland's high school graduates are passing state assessments needed to obtain a diploma, according to data released Wednesday by the state Department of Education, though gaps persist between minority students and their peers. Roughly 59,500 students in the Class of 2013 completed high school, with nearly 90 percent passing the High School Assessments, which are required for graduation and are administered in English, algebra and biology. No student failed to graduate because of failing to meet the requirement.
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NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2014
The Maryland State Board of Education took steps Tuesday to amend the new requirement that students take four years of math during high school. In 2013, the Maryland General Assembly passed a law requiring students to take a math class for each year they are in high school, beginning with those entering as freshmen in the fall of 2014. However, a small percentage of students — about 2.5 percent statewide — take five years to graduate. Those on the five-year graduation track won't have to take a fifth year of math, the state board decided on Tuesday when it voted to publish a new regulation.
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NEWS
November 14, 1991
Maryland's proposed new graduation requirements are too much of a good thing.Recent hearings drew 143 speakers and 693 written comments, an extraordinary outpouring. The most comment was on a mandate that students complete 75 hours of community service. Officials are worried about costs and headaches in administering the program. We stand by our support of the service requirement. Experience has shown that with creativity, this program can cost little yet yield substantial benefits.The problem we see in the new requirements is that the regulations specify too many courses.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | October 30, 2013
The overwhelming majority of Maryland's high school graduates are passing state assessments needed to obtain a diploma, according to data released Wednesday by the state Department of Education, though gaps persist between minority students and their peers. Roughly 59,500 students in the Class of 2013 completed high school, with nearly 90 percent passing the High School Assessments, which are required for graduation and are administered in English, algebra and biology. No student failed to graduate because of failing to meet the requirement.
NEWS
May 31, 2012
In an effort to quell doubts about the city school system's graduation rate, school officials said this week that the district has ordered principals to take an extra measure this year to validate that all graduating seniors have fulfilled state requirements to obtain a diploma. "We are very, very conscious of making sure that everyone is abiding by [state regulation]," said Tisha Edwards, chief of staff for the school system. "So the high school validation process allows principals to be very, very specific about ensuring that seniors are meeting requirements.” The revelation about the new policy -- which requires principals to sign off that they personally know their seniors are eligible for graduation -- came amid a Baltimore Sun inquiry about graduation requirements being met at the National Academy Foundation high school, where officials confirmed that nearly half of the senior class was found to have not completed graduation requirements.
NEWS
By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Staff Writer | November 25, 1992
The state's new high school graduation requirements may mean the Howard County school system will no longer offer such courses as home economics and industrial arts."
NEWS
By Josh Mitchell and Josh Mitchell,SUN STAFF | February 20, 2005
School officials in Harford County are moving to toughen high school graduation requirements by imposing extra courses and lengthy class projects - hurdles that in other states have sometimes spawned protests by parents whose children failed under the new standards. Students would be required to pick a career field in the 10th grade and then take four courses relating to that field. Under the plan presented this month, students would also take a senior-year math course, which is not currently required.
NEWS
By Gelareh Asayesh | July 31, 1991
The state Board of Education moved yesterday toward stringent new graduation requirements that would add a fourth year of math and social studies, a year of technology education and community service to the hurdles students must clear to win their high school diplomas.After extensive debate, board members went far beyond the recommendations of their staff and of a January task force on graduation requirements -- increasing the total number of prescribed "core" courses from 15 to 17.Additional requirements would be imposed as students decided to continue their studies after high school or go straight to work.
NEWS
By Gelareh Asayesh | December 18, 1991
The State Board of Education edged away from sweeping changes in high school graduation requirements yesterday, voting tentatively to leave the number of required math and social studies courses unchanged while adding a third year of science.Board members agreed that students should complete three years each of math, social studies and science in order to graduate. In the area of social studies, they abandoned their original plan of requiring a half-credit each in economics and geography.
NEWS
By Gina Davis and Gina Davis,SUN STAFF | August 12, 2004
Carroll County school officials are proposing changes that would provide more time for parent-teacher conferences as well as increase graduation requirements starting with the 2005-2006 school year. At last night's school board meeting, Superintendent Charles I. Ecker recommended eliminating one professional development day for teachers to add a parent conference day in the spring. The school calendar provides a conference day only in the fall. "It's important to have this extra day for parents to meet with teachers" before the end of the school year, Ecker said.
NEWS
May 31, 2012
In an effort to quell doubts about the city school system's graduation rate, school officials said this week that the district has ordered principals to take an extra measure this year to validate that all graduating seniors have fulfilled state requirements to obtain a diploma. "We are very, very conscious of making sure that everyone is abiding by [state regulation]," said Tisha Edwards, chief of staff for the school system. "So the high school validation process allows principals to be very, very specific about ensuring that seniors are meeting requirements.” The revelation about the new policy -- which requires principals to sign off that they personally know their seniors are eligible for graduation -- came amid a Baltimore Sun inquiry about graduation requirements being met at the National Academy Foundation high school, where officials confirmed that nearly half of the senior class was found to have not completed graduation requirements.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2011
An American government exam taken by all high school students in Maryland would be eliminated next year under the proposed state budget, a surprising shift in policy that comes just three years after the test was made a graduation requirement. Gov. Martin O'Malley's proposal cuts $1.9 million from the Maryland State Department of Education budget that would pay for the test and its grading. However, the legislature could still restore the test if it found the funding. Some educators expressed immediate concern that social studies would get less attention in high schools if the test is eliminated.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | September 21, 2010
The Maryland State Board of Education voted unanimously Tuesday to make environmental education a part of every student's education, but put off making it a graduation requirement. The Chesapeake Bay Foundation, which had advocated for making environmental studies a part of the curriculum, had hoped for stronger requirements than what was passed by the board, but the nonprofit advocacy group said the board's action was a "partial victory. " Under the new regulation, high school students will not need to take any additional courses, but environmental education will be added into existing courses, such as biology.
NEWS
By Martin O'Malley | July 27, 2010
Every child deserves the right to discover and enjoy our natural world — to catch a fish, camp under the stars, follow a trail and play and learn outdoors in countless other ways. These life-changing experiences help children grow stronger, smarter and healthier, and develop a sense of responsibility for our water, land and wildlife. This is why I created the Maryland Partnership for Children in Nature in 2008 to develop a plan to make sure every Maryland child has the opportunity to learn about and connect with nature.
NEWS
September 23, 2009
After the years of worry about whether the newly instituted high school assessment test requirements for Maryland's class of 2009 would be so difficult that they would keep thousands from graduating, the results announced this week seem like pretty stark reassurance: Only 11 students in the entire state failed to graduate because of the tests. In fact, the figure was so minuscule that some are now questioning whether the requirements are too easy and should be stiffened. But the number 11 is not the one that we should be focusing on. There were another 2,280 students who failed the HSA but also failed other graduation requirements.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,liz.bowie@baltsun.com | December 19, 2008
With 4,000 high school seniors in Maryland still failing to meet new graduation requirements, the state school board yesterday decided to allow principals and local superintendents to waive the requirements for students with extenuating circumstances. The emergency regulation, which passed unanimously, is designed for those students who can't meet the requirements "through no fault of their own," said state schools chief Nancy S. Grasmick. She estimated that a few hundred students would receive the waiver.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,liz.bowie@baltsun.com | December 18, 2008
The Maryland State Board of Education is expected to adopt an emergency regulation today to allow superintendents to waive passage of the high school assessment as a graduation requirement in certain circumstances. The superintendents in each district would gain the power to rescue hundreds of students who would not graduate from high school in June because they have been unable to pass four subject exams or complete projects. Some educators had raised concerns that whole groups of students in certain school systems had not taken government until their senior year and might not have enough time to take the test and get extra help if they failed.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,liz.bowie@baltsun.com | October 29, 2008
Maryland's state school board made a final decision yesterday to hold firm and require this year's high school seniors to pass four subject tests to graduate in June, although it left open the possibility of exemptions for special education students and those learning English. The decision leaves 9,059 students across the state - or about 17 percent of the Class of 2009 - at risk of not getting a diploma, according to data released yesterday. Only 70 percent of African-Americans statewide and 50 percent of special education students have met the requirements.
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