Advertisement
HomeCollectionsGraduation Rates
IN THE NEWS

Graduation Rates

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Joanna H. Fox and John Bridgeland | March 28, 2011
Baltimore's public schools are being recognized as "revitalized" and on an upward trajectory in a national report released last week. As part of the March 2011 Grad Nation Summit, bringing together more than 800 education and policymaking leaders in Washington, D.C., Baltimore was among four school systems cited for significant progress over the last decade. The report, "Building a Grad Nation: Progress and Challenge in Ending the High School Dropout Epidemic, 2010-2011 Annual Report," highlights that the high school graduation rate in Baltimore City Public Schools has increased approximately 12 percentage points since 1996 (16 percentage points if students who take five years to graduate are counted)
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2014
University System of Maryland schools have had mixed success in improving the graduation rates of minority and low-income students, according to an annual progress report released this week. Some colleges, including the University of Maryland, College Park and the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, have been able to boost minority and low-income achievement. But at other schools, the gaps between those students and middle-class whites have increased in recent years. "I was shocked to see the numbers," said Frank M. Reid III, a university system regent and pastor of Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Baltimore.
Advertisement
NEWS
Liz Bowie | June 8, 2012
Education Week released its annual report on graduation rates Friday and Montgomery, Baltimore and Anne Arundel counties rank high on a list of the 50 largest districts in the nation for 2009. Montgomery has a graduation rate of 87 percent, the best in the nation for large systems. Baltimore County came in fourth and Anne Arundel was ranked sixth. Baltimore City came in  47th with a graduation rate of 50 percent.  Howard County's school system is not large enough to be in the top 50. Education Week calculates the graduation rate differently from the state, and so the numbers are not always consistent with what school system's report each year to Maryland school officials.
NEWS
February 23, 2014
Baltimore City Public Schools were at a critical juncture last May when Tisha Edwards was appointed to lead the system on an interim basis. Over the past half-dozen years, the school system has made steady progress toward improving graduation rates, decreasing school suspensions and increasing scores on standardized tests. And last March, the General Assembly approved an historic $1 billion financing plan designed to renovate or rebuild approximately 50 schools over the next decade.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | January 8, 2013
Gov. Martin O'Malley, speaking at the first statewide forum on college completion, called on Maryland's higher education institutions Tuesday to devise new ways to use technology to bolster graduation rates. "We've done a much better job in getting people to college," O'Malley told educators assembled at Morgan State University for the forum. "We need to improve getting people through college. " O'Malley has called for 55 percent of Maryland adults to have a college degree or advanced certification by 2025.
SPORTS
By Gerald Eskenazi and Gerald Eskenazi,New York Times News Service | March 28, 1991
A recent survey has disclosed that while athletes at Division I colleges and universities graduate at a higher rate than non-athletes, fewer than 40 percent of football and basketball players receive their degrees in five years.The survey, in which 262 of 295 colleges responded, was reported yesterday in the Chronicle of Higher Education, a weekly journal.Its findings, based on five-year graduation rates for students from 1984 to 1989, include:* More than 56 percent of Division I athletes graduate within five ++ years, compared to about 48 percent of all students.
NEWS
November 29, 1998
IN THESE days of global competitiveness, a nation that fails to move ahead falls behind. That is the first lesson that can be drawn from a recent report comparing graduation rates of the world's industrialized countries.Lesson two: The United States is falling behind on several important education indicators.The study by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development found that the United States is no longer No. 1 in high school completion rates. Of the 29 countries studied, the United States ranked next to last, beating out only Mexico, in the proportion of high school graduates.
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Gadi Dechter,Sun reporter | June 6, 2007
After about a decade of relatively steady increases, the graduation rate of black students at Maryland public colleges has declined, according to statistics compiled by the University System of Maryland. Moreover, significant gains by black students in recent years have not kept up with retention and graduation rates among all college students in the state's public university system, leading to a slight increase in the so-called achievement gap, officials said. The data were presented yesterday at a meeting of the education policy committee of the university system's Board of Regents.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | July 21, 1999
The NCAA yesterday announced dozens of proposed reforms designed to clean up college basketball. Linking scholarship allotments to graduation rates and lessening the importance of AAU tournaments in the recruiting process were among the recommendations of a 27-person committee, which spent 10 months studying the game and its ills.Some of the committee's recommendations could become NCAA rules as early as the 2000-2001 school year."We asked these folks to be `practical idealists,' " said Kenneth Shaw, the Syracuse chancellor who chaired the Division I Working Group to Study Basketball Issues.
NEWS
By Stephanie Banchero and Stephanie Banchero,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 23, 2008
CHICAGO -- In a last-ditch effort to strengthen the No Child Left Behind law, the Bush administration announced yesterday that it will require schools to make sure that low-income and minority students graduate from high school at the same rate as their white and more affluent counterparts. Schools that fail to meet those goals would face sanctions, according to a wide-ranging plan unveiled by Secretary of Education Margaret Spellings. Currently, the law requires that schools meet a graduation target for the entire senior class.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2014
Maryland's high school graduation rate has been climbing steadily for the past four years and reached nearly 85 percent — far above the national average — this past June, according to data released Tuesday. More students from every corner of the state are staying in school to earn a diploma, but the increases were most pronounced among Hispanic and African-American students. State education officials credited the passage of Maryland's Dream Act, which gave hope to Hispanic students who want to attend college in the state, as one of the factors for the 2.5 percentage point increase in the graduation rate for Hispanics.
SPORTS
The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2013
Division I men's and women's lacrosse are among the NCAA's Graduation Success Rate leaders, according to data released Thursday. Men's lacrosse had a GSR of 87.1 percent for the four-year period ending in 2006. That number is among the leaders in Division I sports and up slightly from the four-year period ending in 2005, which was 85.5 percent. By comparison, water polo had the highest rate at 93.8 percent, while FCS football was the lowest at less than 70 percent. The GSR is a four-year measure of freshmen and transfers who enrolled at a school between the fall of 2003 and the spring of 2007.
SPORTS
The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2013
The NCAA released Graduation Success Rate and Federal Graduation Rate scores for all of its Division I athletic programs Thursday. The GSR and FGR are separate from the NCAA's Academic Performance Rates, which can lead to penalties for schools that score poorly. (Those will be released in spring 2014.) According to a release from Maryland, the GSR is a four-year measure of freshmen and transfer student-athletes who entered the university between the fall of 2003 and the spring of 2007.
NEWS
July 9, 2013
Our leaders in Washington face tough budget issues ("Obama budget would have big impact in MD," April 11). But one proposal we should all agree on is for targeted investments in local pre-kindergarten learning. As a grandfather, I support giving America's children a better educational start. As a retired Army general, I see this as a sound investment in making our next generation more competitive and contributing to our national security. The defense department estimates that 75 percent of all Americans age 17-24 are unable to join the military.
NEWS
Erica L. Green and Erica L. Green | June 6, 2013
Baltimore County had the second-highest graduation rate among large districts in the nation in 2010, according to a report released Thursday that has annually scrutinized graduates differently than most states, which also found that Baltimore City has drastically improved from being among the worst rates in the nation. The data was published in an annual report compiled by the trade publication “Education Week,” which analyzes high school completion data published by the U.S. Department of Education, and calculates rates based on a formula that seeks to capture how many students obtain a diploma in four years.
NEWS
By Fred Medinger | March 18, 2013
Coppin State University has a serious problem with very low rates of student retention and graduation. Last December, the University System of Maryland Board of Regents created a Special Review Committee to look into this problem further and make recommendations. This is of special interest to me, as I served as a member of the faculty at Coppin for 12 years, from 1999 until 2011, including service as Faculty Senate president in 2005-2007. Historically, Coppin's core mission has been to provide much-needed access to quality higher education for the citizens of Baltimore City, especially African-American men and women who often must contend with social and economic barriers because of race.
NEWS
September 25, 1999
EVERYONE who loves college sports applauds the opportunity afforded athletes who get scholarships to big time programs. Competition, travel and the challenges of university life in the NCAA's Division I surely broaden and educate. The joy of victory and the agony of defeat are lessons for life.The growth of international basketball leagues -- with many more jobs for players -- represent another reason to nurture hoop dreams.But the name of the game is still education -- and not just because the athlete will need another source of income some day. The nation's colleges and universities need to be held accountable for the bargains they make -- and too often break.
BUSINESS
By Chicago Tribune | August 10, 1992
The notion of a "four-year" college education is getting about as outdated as freshmen wearing beanies on the quad.Only 15 percent of students at colleges and universities graduate within the traditional four-year time span, according to a recent study by the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities.Fewer than half of freshmen entering four-year colleges and universities these days obtained a bachelor's degree after six years, the study found. Black and Hispanic student success rates were considerably lower.
NEWS
March 12, 2013
In keeping with national trends, 60 percent more women than men enroll at Towson University. Graduation rates for women versus men are similar. It wasn't that long ago that universities were tripping over themselves to increase the enrollment and graduation of women. At a time when universities retain and graduate fewer men, baseball and soccer teams are excellent recruitment opportunities and incentives toward graduation ("Towson president decides to cut baseball, men's soccer," March 8)
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2013
Baltimore continues to lead area school systems in improving its dropout rate, and most districts in the region are making progress in graduating more students in four years, according to new high school data released Monday by the Maryland State Department of Education. Statewide, the Class of 2012 saw steady growth in the percentage of students who earned a high school diploma in four years at 83.6 percent, up from 82.8 percent of students who graduated in 2011. Meanwhile, the number of students who dropped out in 2012 fell to 10.3 percent, down from 11.2 percent, according to the department.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.