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NEWS
Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2012
The University of Maryland, College Park will use a $1.1 million grant from defense contractor Northrop Grumman Corp. to establish a new honors concentration in cybersecurity, school officials announced Monday. With the program, which will accept its first students for fall 2013, the university is attempting to gain a foothold in a growing discipline already taught at the U.S. Naval Academy and the University of Maryland Baltimore County. Maryland is considered rich ground for cybersecurity training because of the presence of the National Security Agency headquarters at Fort Meade and the plethora of government and private technology offices in the region.
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NEWS
October 6, 2011
Thank you for your portrayal of the recent downtown Baltimore sit-in ("'Occupy' protesters gather," Sept. 5). Reporter Peter Hermann 's account of a 53-year-old former real estate broker who quit her job to sell costume jewelry and now complains about not being able to afford "a bookkeeper" and a "web designer" brought home the degree of self-absorption, entitlement, neediness and sheer dweeb-iness of the assorted suburban PTA moms, tenured sociologists,...
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | July 27, 2011
The Maryland Institute College of Art announced Wednesday that it has received a $10 million gift, the largest in its history, which will be used to expand graduate programs and research. The gift was bestowed by longtime college trustee George L. Bunting Jr. and his wife, Anne Bunting. "Once again, George and Anne have redefined what true leadership can do to propel the college ahead," said Michael Franco, the college's vice president of advancement. "Not only was Mr. Bunting instrumental in helping MICA see the important role of graduate study in its future, he and his wife also stepped forward with this wonderful gift of endowment to help ensure the college will have the necessary resources to pursue this path.
BUSINESS
By CAROLYN BIGDA | June 19, 2005
FOR GRADUATE students, money habitually is in short supply. And by now, the pool of scholarships and grants to help ease that need for next school year largely is drained. According to FindTuition.com, a fee-based scholarship search engine, only about 20 percent of scholarships for graduate students carry deadlines through December. Still, several options exist, even this close to the start of the fall semester: First, if you're working and attending school simultaneously, see if your company offers tuition reimbursement or tuition assistance.
NEWS
By Gary Dorsey and Gary Dorsey,SUN STAFF | March 16, 2000
At Towson University, Bryan Jablonski hid a tape recorder during class so he could later translate his teacher's broken English. At Princeton University, Bill Fedyna had four teachers in a math course for engineers. Three of them did not speak English. At the University of Missouri, Don Collins could communicate with the instructor of his chemistry lab only by jotting down questions in a notebook and waiting for a written response. "It's not so unusual," Collins said. "Almost everyone has a story like that."
NEWS
By George F. Will | April 20, 1997
WASHINGTON -- A former graduate student at Yale writes in the Chronicle of Higher Education that she has purged her shelves of certain professors' books because she can no longer read them ''without literally becoming nauseated.'' What sickens her is that the professors resisted recognition of a graduate-students' union. That is just one form of the strife that is depressing the quality of increasingly expensive college educations.Last year, to protest what they consider ''exploitation,'' Yale graduate students who are teaching assistants conducted a ''grade strike,'' refusing to turn in grades for the undergraduates they had taught.
NEWS
By Andres De Los Reyes | November 18, 2010
In its "Pledge to America," Republicans in the House of Representatives proposed to roll back discretionary federal spending to 2008 levels. In the wake of the recent midterm elections, the American Association for the Advancement of Science released a report indicating that if the Republican-led House followed through with this proposal, it would lead to nearly $3 billion in cuts to the National Institutes of Health and more than $1 billion in...
NEWS
November 17, 2004
THE UNITED States was once the leading destination for smart and wealthy foreign students in search of top-notch higher education. Then 9/11 happened and Americans learned that two of the hijackers had entered this country on student visas. This country's relationship with foreign students has not been the same since. Strict screenings are now required of all student visa applicants, and the rules for staying have been significantly tightened, as have requirements for colleges to track foreign students.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN STAFF | May 19, 1997
Monsignor Robert R. Kline, president emeritus of Mount St. Mary's College in Emmitsburg, calculates that over the course of his career he taught more students -- 13,000 -- than anyone else in the school's 189-year history.It is one of those claims that might be hard to check but impossible not to believe. Kline spent 46 years teaching at the school, leading generations of students through courses in philosophy, psychology and sociology. In addition, he was president from 1961 to 1967.Yesterday Mount St. Mary's awarded him an honorary degree in recognition of his long service.
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