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NEWS
February 15, 2007
Applications are being accepted for the 2007 Baltimore City Mayoral Fellowship Program. The program, which will run from June 11 to Aug. 3, is open to students in their junior or senior year of college, and to graduate students and recent college graduates. Fellows, who are paid stipends, will be assigned to projects focusing on such areas as urban planning, public policy and municipal services. They will make presentations to the mayor and her Cabinet at the end of the program. The application deadline is March 1. Information or application: www.ci.
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BUSINESS
September 24, 1990
Scientists at the Johns Hopkins University recently announced advances in the creation of a synthetic vitamin D, which could be used as an anti-cancer or anti-psoriasis drug, and a new class of biodegradable polymers for controlled drug delivery and in orthopedics. They also said they have identified two enzymes that can withstand high temperatures.The findings were presented at a meeting of the American Chemical Society in August.A synthetic vitamin D could alter the makeup of natural vitamin D so that it does not assist the growth of cancer cells but also does not disrupt other properties, such as helping the body absorb calcium.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2014
Seven years after the University of Baltimore admitted its first freshman class, new President Kurt L. Schmoke is considering a return to the school's roots as an upper-division college that enrolled only juniors and seniors. The enrollment growth that came with the first underclassmen in 2007 has stagnated. UB enrolls about 200 freshmen each fall, and the university still attracts mostly transfers and graduate students. In an interview Friday, Schmoke spoke of flat public funding and a need to work more efficiently.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Sheila Hotchkin and Timothy B. Wheeler and Sheila Hotchkin,SUN STAFF | March 20, 1998
The University of Maryland, College Park is beefing up security, and worried women are walking with escorts after dark in the wake of two assaults and a rape reported on campus in the past week.Last night, about 80 students and staff turned out for a vigil in front of the student union to vent their anger over the incidents."All the women on campus are frightened," said Kristy Wright, a Student Government Association vice president."No one's walking alone," she said. "We never should have walked alone in the first place."
NEWS
By Lou Ferrara and Lou Ferrara,Special to The Sun | January 3, 1992
Even though she knew she wouldn't get paid for it, Kawther Zaki, a professor at the University of Maryland in College Park, came to work yesterday."I don't particularly like this, but I have things to do," said the electrical engineering professor, the only person working in her office yesterday. "If I didn't come in, work would have been delayed, papers I need to sign for my students would have been delayed."Dr. Zaki is one of the more than 2,500 faculty and staff workers scheduled for up to three days of furloughs to save money at the state's flagship campus.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | July 1, 2004
Jessica Soto Perez was working toward a doctorate in biochemical engineering, hoping, her fellow students said, to one day return to her native Puerto Rico to teach. Yesterday, her classmates and professors at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, mourned the loss of a friend who, as one put it, "radiated her love for learning." Perez, a 26-year-old graduate student at UMBC, was fatally shot Tuesday night in the parking lot of the school's Catonsville campus by her husband, who then shot himself, witnesses told Baltimore County police.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Staff Writer | March 22, 1992
When it comes to Ph.D.s, Frank L. Morris Sr. wants universities to buy American -- especially black American.The scarcity of black American Ph.D.s has long troubled educators. And the number of foreign doctoral students at U.S. universities has been growing for years.Now Dr. Frank L. Morris Sr., dean of graduate studies at Morgan State University, has stirred up the nation's higher-education establishment by suggesting that the two facts are directly related.U.S. universities often pay the way of foreign doctoral students and leave Americans, especially minorities, to fend for themselves, Dr. Morris argues.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 21, 1992
For years American educators have worried about the small number of black students going on to receive Ph.D.s, the degrees that make them eligible to become the professors and researchers of tomorrow. In particular, they have been unable to explain why the number of black men who get their doctorates, small to begin with, has been cut in half since 1975.The numbers are sobering. Of the 36,027 Ph.D.s granted in 1990, only 320 -- less than 1 percent -- were awarded to black men. And 508, or just over 1 percent, were given to black women.
BUSINESS
By CAROLYN BIGDA | June 19, 2005
FOR GRADUATE students, money habitually is in short supply. And by now, the pool of scholarships and grants to help ease that need for next school year largely is drained. According to FindTuition.com, a fee-based scholarship search engine, only about 20 percent of scholarships for graduate students carry deadlines through December. Still, several options exist, even this close to the start of the fall semester: First, if you're working and attending school simultaneously, see if your company offers tuition reimbursement or tuition assistance.
NEWS
By George F. Will | April 20, 1997
WASHINGTON -- A former graduate student at Yale writes in the Chronicle of Higher Education that she has purged her shelves of certain professors' books because she can no longer read them ''without literally becoming nauseated.'' What sickens her is that the professors resisted recognition of a graduate-students' union. That is just one form of the strife that is depressing the quality of increasingly expensive college educations.Last year, to protest what they consider ''exploitation,'' Yale graduate students who are teaching assistants conducted a ''grade strike,'' refusing to turn in grades for the undergraduates they had taught.
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