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By Andres De Los Reyes | November 18, 2010
In its "Pledge to America," Republicans in the House of Representatives proposed to roll back discretionary federal spending to 2008 levels. In the wake of the recent midterm elections, the American Association for the Advancement of Science released a report indicating that if the Republican-led House followed through with this proposal, it would lead to nearly $3 billion in cuts to the National Institutes of Health and more than $1 billion in...
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NEWS
By George F. Will | April 20, 1997
WASHINGTON -- A former graduate student at Yale writes in the Chronicle of Higher Education that she has purged her shelves of certain professors' books because she can no longer read them "without literally becoming nauseated." What sickens her is that the professors resisted recognition of a graduate-students' union. That is just one form of the strife that is depressing the quality of increasingly expensive college educations.Last year, to protest what they consider "exploitation," Yale graduate students who are teaching assistants conducted a "grade strike," refusing to turn in grades for the undergraduates they had taught.
NEWS
November 17, 2004
THE UNITED States was once the leading destination for smart and wealthy foreign students in search of top-notch higher education. Then 9/11 happened and Americans learned that two of the hijackers had entered this country on student visas. This country's relationship with foreign students has not been the same since. Strict screenings are now required of all student visa applicants, and the rules for staying have been significantly tightened, as have requirements for colleges to track foreign students.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN STAFF | May 19, 1997
Monsignor Robert R. Kline, president emeritus of Mount St. Mary's College in Emmitsburg, calculates that over the course of his career he taught more students -- 13,000 -- than anyone else in the school's 189-year history.It is one of those claims that might be hard to check but impossible not to believe. Kline spent 46 years teaching at the school, leading generations of students through courses in philosophy, psychology and sociology. In addition, he was president from 1961 to 1967.Yesterday Mount St. Mary's awarded him an honorary degree in recognition of his long service.
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,SUN STAFF | May 24, 1997
Acknowledging an increase of intolerance and that "we are not one nation," former Congressman Kweisi Mfume challenged Goucher College graduates yesterday to fix the problems created "by those in my time," while fighting poverty and violence."
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | December 14, 1999
Thousands of Jewish college students -- including more than 200 from Maryland -- will head to Israel as 2000 dawns next month, for free.Their trips will be paid for by Birthright Israel, a philanthropic initiative geared to reconnecting an increasingly assimilated young Jewish population with its religious homeland. The program's ultimate goal -- to provide an "Israel experience" to every young Jew.The first wave of Birthright trips, offered to college and graduate students, has attracted a flurry of interest.
NEWS
By Tim Newell | December 19, 2011
The five weeks between Thanksgiving and New Year's Day are the equivalent of "Black Friday" for charities, which receive nearly half of their annual donations during the holiday season, according to a Charity Navigator survey. Colleges and universities are no exception. Higher education institutions always have been among America's most successful fundraisers. In fact, of the 400 nonprofit organizations that raised the most money last year, nearly a third were colleges and universities, the Chronicle of Philanthropy found.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | March 29, 2002
Liquid nitrogen, which researcher Sean O'Hearn described as "colder than the moon," looks like a witches' brew of steam, and yesterday a working group of fifth-graders from Tench Tilghman Elementary School saw a spellbinding use for it at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. "You know the best kind of science there is? The kind you can eat!" O'Hearn told the half a dozen youngsters, who were visiting for the second annual Community Science Day, as he energetically added elements of chocolate ice cream - milk, cocoa syrup, sugar and peanut butter pieces - to the liquid nitrogen moments before the lunch break.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | August 3, 1992
IMPOSTORS IN THE TEMPLE. By Martin Anderson. Simon & Schuster. 256 pages. $22.THE MAIN contribution of this indictment of academic practices is an assault on the use of graduate students -- teaching assistants -- to teach university classes. "Children teaching children" cheats the undergraduates and exploits the graduate students, delaying the degrees of both.All because professors want to do research and not teach. Or not actually do the research; research is pretty tedious. The vulnerable graduate students can do that, too -- as long as the tenured professors who hold the fate of the graduate students in their hands get credit in academic journals for the papers.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | March 12, 1996
The Johns Hopkins University will begin work this summer on a $17 million modernization of Homewood Apartments, a seven-story building at 3003 N. Charles St. that is home to 230 students.University trustees voted last month to move ahead with the development, the largest of five residential projects that Hopkins has launched in recent years to provide attractive student housing near its Homewood campus.Besides providing housing for students, the reconfigured building will have one floor of office space and "upscale retail space," at street level, according to Robert Schuerholz, director of facilities management for Hopkins.
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