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By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | February 5, 2014
Johns Hopkins graduate students and professors are calling for a moratorium on the university's plan to increase stipends for graduate students in the arts and humanities while shrinking their numbers, saying it could stymie research and the free flow of ideas. Officials with the Zanvyl Krieger School of Arts and Sciences say they need to raise the stipends for graduate students, now $22,000 per school year, to $30,000 to remain competitive with peer institutions. But they also say that, because of the cost, the move would require them to admit about 20 percent fewer humanities graduate students.
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NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2014
Jasmine White was accepted to Morgan State University, her dream college, almost 10 years ago. But the New Yorker discovered she could not afford the out-of-state tuition. "I just started crying because I had no idea where I was going to get [the money] before class started," White recalled. Instead of coming to Baltimore, she earned an associate's degree at a community college in New York, and served five years in the Army Reserve. Now 26, she is finally enrolling at Morgan State this fall.
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NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | May 18, 2003
A criminal justice professor at Coppin State College denied allegations yesterday that he rejected the thesis topic proposed by one of his graduate students, insisting he "would not censor academic freedom." The allegations emerged amid a dispute last week over Coppin's criminal justice program and whether some master's degree candidates would be permitted to graduate today without meeting what some faculty insist are degree requirements. Four graduate students who wrote research papers deemed unacceptable by department Chairperson Concetta Culliver are expected to receive their master's degrees, but others who failed comprehensive exams will not be allowed to graduate, according to Coppin officials.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2014
Seven years after the University of Baltimore admitted its first freshman class, new President Kurt L. Schmoke is considering a return to the school's roots as an upper-division college that enrolled only juniors and seniors. The enrollment growth that came with the first underclassmen in 2007 has stagnated. UB enrolls about 200 freshmen each fall, and the university still attracts mostly transfers and graduate students. In an interview Friday, Schmoke spoke of flat public funding and a need to work more efficiently.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | February 23, 1999
Six Morgan State University graduate students displayed their ideas yesterday for enhancing the Waverly business district on Greenmount Avenue, site of a new "Main Street" effort.While their designs will not definitely be implemented, it was a chance to rethink the "self-image" and identity of the area centered at 33rd Street and Greenmount Avenue, said Frank Jannuzi, president of the Charles Village Community Benefits District. "I found so much that was attractive and provocative."Main Street is a national program that promotes more vibrant downtown areas.
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Gadi Dechter,Sun reporter | February 20, 2008
Graduate-student leaders and labor activists squared off against university administrators yesterday over a bill before the General Assembly to grant teaching assistants and contractual faculty the right to form unions. The debate in a House of Delegates committee centered - as it has in other states - on the question of whether giving graduate-student employees the same collective bargaining rights as other state workers would undermine the educational relationship between professors and students.
NEWS
By Janie J. C. O'Neal and Janie J. C. O'Neal,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | June 28, 1998
About 90 area schoolchildren will go back to school tomorrow -- along with 30 graduate students -- for the six-week Summer Clinic in Reading and Written Expression at Loyola College.The children will be given instruction in basic reading and writing skills, while the graduate students will be working with them -- and working toward a master of education degree at the same time.Held annually, the summer clinic is open to students entering first through 12th grades. Most who take part "have been coming for two or three years now," says Robert Peters, Loyola's coordinator of professional development schools and summer clinic director.
NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,[Sun Reporter] | January 7, 2007
Michael likes to give hugs and can be something of a night owl. Jenny bowls and is always up for an outing. Becky delights in music and enjoys shrimp and diet Coke. They are clients whom McDaniel College graduate students Melanie Soper and Ila Bryant care for as part of a two-year program. The students earn a master's in human services management in special education, while gaining practical experience through a simultaneous live-in internship with three developmentally disabled clients.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | June 28, 2001
WITH SO MUCH of Baltimore in decline, what can be learned from those neighborhoods that are bucking the trend? In papers presented in the spring, graduate-student researchers at two universities sought to address that question -- with intriguing results. In one paper, George R. Wagner studied gentrification in Federal Hill, Fells Point and Canton for his doctoral dissertation in policy sciences at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. A late-blooming academic at age 58 who moved from Catonsville to South Baltimore in 1980, Wagner uses census data to demonstrate that these neighborhoods began to decline in the 1940s, as the city was growing, and did not begin to be reborn until development of the Inner Harbor in 1980.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | April 10, 1997
Alicia Showalter Reynolds enjoyed her research at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine -- work that she hoped might one day help prevent a tropical parasitic disease.Yet the fourth-year graduate student treasured just as much the prospect of inspiring others to follow her. She wanted, she told friends, to teach women about science.At 25, Reynolds disappeared while driving from Baltimore to Charlottesville, Va., on a Saturday morning to go shopping with her mother. Nearly a year after her body was found, the crime remains unsolved.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | February 13, 2014
Officials from the Chesapeake Science Point Public Charter School in Hanover came to a school board meeting this month eager to discover whether their fledgling high school program would be allowed to continue. Even before the meeting began, they must have known they had reason for optimism. School board members had been boasting somewhat about the school — during an earlier presentation before the county delegation, where lawmakers suggested Anne Arundel should have a 13th high school, board members responded that a 13th high school already existed: Chesapeake Science Point.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | February 5, 2014
Johns Hopkins graduate students and professors are calling for a moratorium on the university's plan to increase stipends for graduate students in the arts and humanities while shrinking their numbers, saying it could stymie research and the free flow of ideas. Officials with the Zanvyl Krieger School of Arts and Sciences say they need to raise the stipends for graduate students, now $22,000 per school year, to $30,000 to remain competitive with peer institutions. But they also say that, because of the cost, the move would require them to admit about 20 percent fewer humanities graduate students.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | December 20, 2013
Dr. Peter C. Maloney, an internationally known biochemist who was a professor of physiology and associate dean for graduate students at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, died Dec. 12 of cancer at his Bare Hills home. He was 72. "Peter was such a wonderful person who did everything with grace and fairness. He was beloved by everyone," said Dr. William B. Guggino, professor of physiology and vice chair for research in pediatrics at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2013
With the start of classes just weeks away, Maryland financial aid directors sighed with relief that Congress has finally reached an agreement on student loan interest rates that will lower costs for borrowers this academic year. "We have been getting calls from students," said Zhanna Goltser, director of financial aid at Notre Dame of Maryland University in Baltimore. "It's great that it will save money for students who are borrowing now. " "Now" is the key word. Under a new formula created by lawmakers, the rate on certain federal loans could go up significantly in a few years.
NEWS
July 24, 2013
After months of partisan haggling and finger-pointing, the Senate is scheduled to vote today on a bill that would keep interest rates on college student loans from doubling. Actually, the rate already has doubled - from 3.4 percent to 6.8 percent - because Congress missed a June 30 deadline to avoid an automatic increase in borrowing costs that was scheduled to kick in if lawmakers didn't act. Now senators and representatives are rushing to play catch-up before students report to campus, in hopes that they won't be blamed for yet another failure to act in the national interest.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2013
Though much remained unknown about the suspect in the shootings near the University of Maryland's College Park campus, a picture emerged Tuesday of a quiet, studious young man who had completed several high-profile summer internships with NASA. Dayvon M. Green, 23, a graduate engineering student, had studied industrial and systems engineering at Morgan State University. He was a 2010 and 2011 summer intern at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, close to the College Park campus, according to NASA.
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | February 4, 1996
The piece playing today at the Theatre Project took shape like a statue carved out of smoke.Called "The Baltimore Project," it was created by graduate students from Towson State University's theater drama program, rigorously guided by professionals from the much-acclaimed Touchstone Theater Ensemble of Bethlehem, Pa.Seven students working toward master of fine arts degrees fanned out into Baltimore in search of their own vision of the city. They looked for characters and quirks, icons and legends, myths and truths.
NEWS
By Ron Snyder and Ron Snyder,Special to the Sun | December 5, 1999
Digging in the dirt and searching the woods for turtles sounds like child's play, not research. But six students at Towson University have a different view after taking part in a field study that could help them prepare for graduate school.The project -- a study of eastern box turtles headed by Donald Forester, a biology professor -- gives the students a chance to earn independent study credits while assisting researchers from the university and the Baltimore Zoo."It's great for undergraduates to be able to put field experience on their resume," said Forester.
SPORTS
By Jon Fogg, The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2013
Twenty-seven Tufts men's lacrosse players will be suspended for two games this season after "unacceptable behavior," including racist and sexist insults, at a women's volleyball game against Smith College last semester, the Tufts Daily student newspaper has reported. An external investigation was launched by the school's Office of Equal Opportunity after a student accused the players of "calling out sexist and racist insults that disparagingly referenced the Smith players by name and threatened them during the game" Sept.
EXPLORE
December 15, 2012
Christi Noll Ciampaglione has been named by McDaniel College as the recipient of its 2012 Joseph R. Bailer Award. The award is presented each year to a McDaniel College master's degree recipient who has made a significant contribution to the field of education. Christi Noll Ciampaglione graduated with a bachelor's degree in psychology from Indiana University of Pennsylvania in 1996. She earned a master's degree in human services management from McDaniel in 1999 and served as a Target Scholar completing a two-year live-in internship with Target Community & Educational Services, Inc. She started Target's first family support services program in Montgomery County, Md., which has served dozens of families of children with special needs.
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