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Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2013
Senate Minority Leader E.J. Pipkin announced Monday he would retire from the legislature next week and move to Texas to pursue a graduate degree in sports management. Pipkin, 56, served as Republican's chief debater in the Maryland Senate, leading opposition in recent years to the state's new gun-control law, legalization of same-sex marriage, repeal of the death penalty and off-shore wind program. The former investment banker was first elected to the legislature in 2002, knocking of a Democrat and incumbent chairman of the Judicial Proceedings Committee, Pipkin's chief of staff John Fiastro said.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2014
Bernard I.H. "Bernie" Kramer, a retired Baltimore public school vice principal who earlier had been an English department head and reading teacher, died Aug. 14 at Autumn Ridge Nursing Center in Pikesville of complications from a stroke. He was 92. The son of Harry Krasner, a plasterer, and Vivian Levita Krasner, Bernard Herman Krasner was born in Pruzhany, Poland, which is now part of Belarus. He was 4 when he and his family left Poland and arrived at Ellis Island in New York Harbor.
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SPORTS
By Jim Henneman and Jim Henneman,Staff Writer | July 29, 1992
NEW YORK -- His introduction to the big leagues hasn't been quite the way Tommy Shields dreamed it would be, but it has postponed his retirement."I had pretty much decided if I didn't come up this year, I was going to retire," Shields said. That decision had been reached despite the urging of several people, including Jerry Narron, manager of the Rochester Red Wings, the Orioles' Triple-A affiliate, that he give himself at least another year."Jerry and a few other Triple-A managers told me to hang in there," Shields said.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2014
Cordelia D. Oliver, a retired Baltimore public schools educator who was one of the first African-American docents at the Baltimore Museum of Art , died Aug. 4 at Gilchrist Hospice care in Towson of complications from a stroke. She was 92. "Cordelia was a wonderful person, and if anyone met her, they were instantly drawn to her because of her personality," said Camay Calloway Murphy of Baltimore, former executive director of the Eubie Blake Cultural Center and onetime Baltimore school board member.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | July 26, 2004
Robert Seager II, an award-winning historian who established the University of Baltimore's graduate school, died Wednesday of heart failure. He was 79 and lived in Reston, Va. A specialist in American military and diplomatic history, Dr. Seager held several teaching and administrative posts at Maryland schools during his career. He taught history at the Naval Academy in Annapolis from 1961 to 1967 and was dean of Washington College in Chestertown from 1970 to 1972. Dr. Seager then became president for academic affairs at the University of Baltimore.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2010
Katie Blaha leaves her job in Hunt Valley at 5 p.m. every day to return to a house in Catonsville she shares with roommates who are a good bit older than her and ask a lot of personal questions. Even though she's got solid employment and has weathered the worst of the economic downturn, Blaha, like so many in her generation, is back living with her parents. "I want to save money, so I'm not just getting by," said the 22-year-old who graduated from Washington College in 2009, and spent nearly a year working internships — paid and unpaid — before she could put her degree to use in a marketing firm.
BUSINESS
By GAIL MARKSJARVIS | January 15, 2006
My daughter will graduate with a bachelor's degree in May and might go to graduate school. What type of financial aid is available for grad school? Does she fill out a FAFSA or something else? - R.S.F., via the Internet Financial aid for graduate school is different from what you've experienced so far. For graduate programs, the student must apply for financial aid and fill out the complex Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), the same form used to determine a family's ability to pay for undergraduate programs.
NEWS
By the hartford courant | December 5, 1999
HARTFORD, Conn. -- A group of entrepreneurs with a lofty idea for a graduate school that emphasizes personal growth, not career training, has won a license to start a college from scratch.Connecticut officials have authorized the group to proceed with plans for an unusual institution that will operate in real classrooms and through computer hookups.The Graduate Institute -- offering master's degrees in areas such as "holistic thinking," "conscious evolution" and "experiential health and healing" -- is believed to be the only school of its kind in the nation.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | October 19, 1998
Peter Lorenzi remembers when a blackboard and dusty nub of chalk where the only tools a teacher needed. Those days are quickly fading.When the dean of Loyola College's graduate school of business steps into his classroom these days, he can brush a small touch-screen panel with his finger and dim the lights, jolt the videocassette recorder to life, call up a Web page on a giant projection screen or cut to a television show.When Lorenzi lectures, he no longer has to turn around to read from the blackboard.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | March 11, 2014
U.S. News and World Report ranked the Johns Hopkins University's School of Education No. 1 in the nation for graduate education programs, above two state programs better known as teaching schools: University of Maryland, College Park at No. 26 and Towson University at No. 116. The annual rankings of graduate schools in various disciplines is being released, and it gives the education program at Hopkins the top billing for the first time, up from...
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | July 4, 2014
Mary Elizabeth Dyer Corrin, a code-breaker during World War II and former teacher at two Towson-area elementary schools, died June 30 of lung cancer at the Blakehurst retirement community. She was 92. The daughter of Navy Vice Adm. George C. Dyer, Mrs. Corrin was born in Manila in the Philippines; by the time she graduated from high school, she told her family later, she had attended 22 different schools. While her family was stationed in Hawaii, Mrs. Corrin traveled by boat and train to attend Smith College in Massachusetts, where she majored in math.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | March 11, 2014
U.S. News and World Report ranked the Johns Hopkins University's School of Education No. 1 in the nation for graduate education programs, above two state programs better known as teaching schools: University of Maryland, College Park at No. 26 and Towson University at No. 116. The annual rankings of graduate schools in various disciplines is being released, and it gives the education program at Hopkins the top billing for the first time, up from...
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | January 20, 2014
Washington College's bid for a third consecutive appearance in the NCAA tournament will have to be accomplished without a trio of players who were crucial to the past two playoff runs. Attackman Bennett Cord graduated, taking with him a team-leading 33 goals and 31 assists last season en route to being named a second-team All American. Senior Jim Cusick, who recorded 28 goals and four assists in 2012, has shown the potential to fill Cord's role as a playmaker, but coach Jeff Shirk said he does not expect Cusick to play like Cord.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg | December 11, 2013
As Grace Lee Chou rang a brass school bell by hand in the hallways of Loch Raven High School on a recent Sunday afternoon, television sets in many area homes were tuned into the Ravens game and families were busy with typical weekend activities. But six first- and second-graders were soon hard at work in a classroom, repeating letters and consonant blends in unison as their teacher, Julie Liu, pointed to them one by one on a chalkboard. The children were competing to see who could recite the letters the loudest and who could get the most correct, a scene common in schools the world over.
NEWS
October 16, 2013
The Sun's recent editorial regarding historically black colleges and universities in this state ( "Maryland HBCU case: A ruling without remedies," Oct. 13) reflects some of the circular, tortured reasoning to which the newspaper resorts on occasions. I worked in the graduate school at Morgan State University from 1972 until 1985. It should be noted that in 1974, the graduate enrollment at Morgan was over 1,000 students and was racially divided about 50 - 50 between black and white students.
SPORTS
The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2013
Denver Outlaws defenseman Lee Zink (Maryland) became the second player in Major League Lacrosse history to earn back-to-back Defensive Player of the Year awards, the league announced Wednesday. Zink earned all 16 possible first-place votes from the league's coaches and general managers, making him the only player to win an end-of-the-year award unanimously this season. Brodie Merrill of the Hamilton Nationals and Michael Evans (South River, Johns Hopkins) of the Chesapeake Bayhawks trailed with five second-place votes each and four and two third-place votes, respectively.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | December 20, 1998
Maren Hassinger points to a pile of flimsy pink plastic shopping bags in one corner of her office/studio at the Maryland Institute, College of Art. "Those bags are from one of the happiest days I've spent here," she says.On a lovely afternoon last spring, Hassinger decided that students in her performance workshop at the Rinehart School of Sculpture would tie the pink bags together and weave them in and out of the trees outside.People ended up chasing the bags in the breeze, and, as Hassinger describes it, the day unfolded like an idyllic scene out of an 18th-century painting - except that chasing the bags involved dodging cars.
NEWS
By Melissa Harris | September 22, 2006
Editor's note: Marking the first anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, the Federal Workers column offers the last of three accounts from Maryland-based employees who volunteered to respond to the Gulf Coast. Angel Hebert and her husband, Dr. Chad Nelson of Ellicott City have worked for the federal government since graduate school - Hebert eventually landed at the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services; Nelson at the Food and Drug Administration. Acquaintances since age 12, both came from New Orleans to Maryland for graduate school.
NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2013
Senate Minority Leader E.J. Pipkin announced Monday he would retire from the legislature next week and move to Texas to pursue a graduate degree in sports management. Pipkin, 56, served as Republican's chief debater in the Maryland Senate, leading opposition in recent years to the state's new gun-control law, legalization of same-sex marriage, repeal of the death penalty and off-shore wind program. The former investment banker was first elected to the legislature in 2002, knocking of a Democrat and incumbent chairman of the Judicial Proceedings Committee, Pipkin's chief of staff John Fiastro said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | April 12, 2013
When Secret Mountains released its long-awaited first album, "Rainer," in February, the band seemed poised to make a leap to higher prominince in the indie music world. The shoegazed-inspired Baltimore sextet had already garnered positive write-ups from online tastemakers Stereogum and Pitchfork. Even the New York Times joined in the praise with a concert review in 2011. The band achieved all of this without a full-length album to its name. But lately, things have been relatively quiet with the band, and last week, singer Kelly Laughlin announced to The Baltimore Sun why: She had left Secret Mountains right before "Rainer" was released.
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