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Grade Inflation

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NEWS
By Stuart Rojstaczer | March 25, 2009
SAN FRANCISCO -About six years ago, I was sitting in the student union of a small liberal arts college when I saw a graph on the cover of the student newspaper that showed the history of grades given at that institution in the past 30 years. Grades were up. Way up. I'm a scientist by training, and I love numbers. So when I looked at that graph, I wondered: How many colleges and universities have data like this that I can find? The answer is that a lot of schools have data like this hidden somewhere.
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NEWS
December 1, 2009
I am very glad that Mike Preston is not the teacher in my children's classes! ("Mike Preston's report card," Nov. 30.) I'm not sure what scale he is grading on, but it seems that virtually everyone does badly on it. Even after an exciting win against a very good Pittsburgh Steelers team, no one gets an A. That kind of grading scheme is demoralizing, as any good teacher knows. I propose Mr. Preston go get an education degree and not come back to The Sun until after he's graduated.
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NEWS
December 1, 2009
I am very glad that Mike Preston is not the teacher in my children's classes! ("Mike Preston's report card," Nov. 30.) I'm not sure what scale he is grading on, but it seems that virtually everyone does badly on it. Even after an exciting win against a very good Pittsburgh Steelers team, no one gets an A. That kind of grading scheme is demoralizing, as any good teacher knows. I propose Mr. Preston go get an education degree and not come back to The Sun until after he's graduated.
NEWS
By Stuart Rojstaczer | March 25, 2009
SAN FRANCISCO -About six years ago, I was sitting in the student union of a small liberal arts college when I saw a graph on the cover of the student newspaper that showed the history of grades given at that institution in the past 30 years. Grades were up. Way up. I'm a scientist by training, and I love numbers. So when I looked at that graph, I wondered: How many colleges and universities have data like this that I can find? The answer is that a lot of schools have data like this hidden somewhere.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | July 6, 1997
DAN ROSEN, the 33-year-old Pikesville native who's making it in Hollywood, is about to shoot another movie, and this one's on the education beat.Rosen is the writer and director of "Dead Man's Curve." The title is a double entendre referring to a bend in the road as well as a school grading practice. Being "graded on the curve" has saved many a student in a difficult math or science course.In Rosen's film, which he will begin shooting at Towson University next month, a couple of students put to the test one of higher education's bizarre myths -- that when a student commits suicide, his or her surviving roommates receive A's in all their courses for the semester.
NEWS
By Clifford Adelman | May 18, 1995
Washington -- THE COLLEGE graduation season has arrived, a time marked by caps, gowns and accusations of rampant grade inflation.Those who decry slipping standards were reinforced by last month's disclosure that a C student at a California community college had forged a transcript, transferred to Yale, and maintained a B average there.But if everyone is getting As, how come nearly 40 percent of those who enter college don't earn a degree by the time they're 30? Because at most schools, there is no grade inflation.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | August 30, 1998
THE LATEST cause for depression from the state's high schools arrives as parents plunk down their life savings, plus all they can borrow from the banks, plus whatever they can pick up from hocking the family silverware handed down from beloved Aunt Petunia, plus all the nickel deposits on soda bottles they can scrounge up, to pay their kids' college tuition this fall.It turns out, money aside, there's this problem: A lot of the kids will hit their first classes and mutter to themselves, "We never covered this stuff in high school."
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | April 24, 1997
In Carroll County, they boldly attempt to go where no modern public school has gone before. They've eliminated D's from the grade system at North Carroll High, and told students: Get at least a C, or take an F."It brings a new rigor," says Dr. Gregory Eckles, director of secondary schools for Carroll County, who was principal at North Carroll when the great experiment commenced three years ago."We're making the kids use their minds," North Carroll's teachers declare in chorus, to which we hear amens from serious students who have big plans for college.
NEWS
By PETER A. JAY | May 2, 1993
Havre de Grace. -- Afew days ago I attended a ceremony at McDonogh School for new members of Cum Laude, the national scholastic honor society. Two dozen students were initiated, and Judy Woodruff, the television journalist, made a gracious little speech.It was an uplifting occasion, implicitly affirming the old idea that true academic achievement matters and that those who attain it should be recognized, singled out and honored. But there was also a disquieting sense that gatherings such as this haven't the joy and vitality they did a few years ago.Any honor society worthy of the name recognizes only the elite, and such recognition is out of synch with the spirit of these drearily egalitarian times.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | October 30, 2003
The statistic leading off this fall's annual letter from the University of Maryland president to 200,000 alumni, trustees and state leaders is eye-catching: The mean high school grade-point average for incoming UM freshmen, the president reports, "has jumped from 3.5 to 3.9 in just five years." Because a 4.0 GPA represents an "A" average, the 3.9 figure means that the typical student arrives in College Park with nearly perfect grades, right? Well, no, not exactly. Left unmentioned in the use of the 3.9 figure, which UM has also advertised in other contexts, is that half of its students now come from high schools that give extra weight to grades in advanced-placement classes or other honors courses.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | October 30, 2003
The statistic leading off this fall's annual letter from the University of Maryland president to 200,000 alumni, trustees and state leaders is eye-catching: The mean high school grade-point average for incoming UM freshmen, the president reports, "has jumped from 3.5 to 3.9 in just five years." Because a 4.0 GPA represents an "A" average, the 3.9 figure means that the typical student arrives in College Park with nearly perfect grades, right? Well, no, not exactly. Left unmentioned in the use of the 3.9 figure, which UM has also advertised in other contexts, is that half of its students now come from high schools that give extra weight to grades in advanced-placement classes or other honors courses.
NEWS
By Peter Y. Hong and Peter Y. Hong,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 1, 2003
Today's college freshmen got more A's than ever in high school while studying a record low number of hours in their senior year, according to a national survey by the University of California, Los Angeles. But they may not be any smarter than those of past generations. Instead, frenzied competition for college admission has inflated grades and trained students to become experts at winning A's, say the survey's director and college students and officials in Southern California. "Students are more savvy about what it takes to get an A," said Linda J. Sax, the UCLA education professor who directed this year's American Freshman Survey, which has been tracking students' opinions and habits for 37 years.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | August 30, 1998
THE LATEST cause for depression from the state's high schools arrives as parents plunk down their life savings, plus all they can borrow from the banks, plus whatever they can pick up from hocking the family silverware handed down from beloved Aunt Petunia, plus all the nickel deposits on soda bottles they can scrounge up, to pay their kids' college tuition this fall.It turns out, money aside, there's this problem: A lot of the kids will hit their first classes and mutter to themselves, "We never covered this stuff in high school."
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | July 6, 1997
DAN ROSEN, the 33-year-old Pikesville native who's making it in Hollywood, is about to shoot another movie, and this one's on the education beat.Rosen is the writer and director of "Dead Man's Curve." The title is a double entendre referring to a bend in the road as well as a school grading practice. Being "graded on the curve" has saved many a student in a difficult math or science course.In Rosen's film, which he will begin shooting at Towson University next month, a couple of students put to the test one of higher education's bizarre myths -- that when a student commits suicide, his or her surviving roommates receive A's in all their courses for the semester.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | April 24, 1997
In Carroll County, they boldly attempt to go where no modern public school has gone before. They've eliminated D's from the grade system at North Carroll High, and told students: Get at least a C, or take an F."It brings a new rigor," says Dr. Gregory Eckles, director of secondary schools for Carroll County, who was principal at North Carroll when the great experiment commenced three years ago."We're making the kids use their minds," North Carroll's teachers declare in chorus, to which we hear amens from serious students who have big plans for college.
NEWS
By Clifford Adelman | May 18, 1995
Washington -- THE COLLEGE graduation season has arrived, a time marked by caps, gowns and accusations of rampant grade inflation.Those who decry slipping standards were reinforced by last month's disclosure that a C student at a California community college had forged a transcript, transferred to Yale, and maintained a B average there.But if everyone is getting As, how come nearly 40 percent of those who enter college don't earn a degree by the time they're 30? Because at most schools, there is no grade inflation.
NEWS
By Peter Y. Hong and Peter Y. Hong,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 1, 2003
Today's college freshmen got more A's than ever in high school while studying a record low number of hours in their senior year, according to a national survey by the University of California, Los Angeles. But they may not be any smarter than those of past generations. Instead, frenzied competition for college admission has inflated grades and trained students to become experts at winning A's, say the survey's director and college students and officials in Southern California. "Students are more savvy about what it takes to get an A," said Linda J. Sax, the UCLA education professor who directed this year's American Freshman Survey, which has been tracking students' opinions and habits for 37 years.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 25, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Citing significant strides in math and science by women of all ethnic backgrounds, the College Board says that the male-female gap on Scholastic Assessment Test scores continued to narrow among high school students last year.Releasing the annual report on SAT scores, Donald A. Stewart, ** the president of the College Board, which oversees the tests, said:"Since 1987, women have narrowed the male-female gaps in SAT scores by six points for math and verbal, even though they are the majority of SAT takers and come from families with less income and education than men -- factors which tend to depress scores."
NEWS
By PETER A. JAY | May 2, 1993
Havre de Grace. -- Afew days ago I attended a ceremony at McDonogh School for new members of Cum Laude, the national scholastic honor society. Two dozen students were initiated, and Judy Woodruff, the television journalist, made a gracious little speech.It was an uplifting occasion, implicitly affirming the old idea that true academic achievement matters and that those who attain it should be recognized, singled out and honored. But there was also a disquieting sense that gatherings such as this haven't the joy and vitality they did a few years ago.Any honor society worthy of the name recognizes only the elite, and such recognition is out of synch with the spirit of these drearily egalitarian times.
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