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Gracie Mansion

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NEWS
By David W. Dunlap and David W. Dunlap,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 13, 2002
NEW YORK - Looking far richer but feeling a bit emptier than it has in generations, a thoroughly refreshed Gracie Mansion is beginning its third century cast in every familiar role - historical museum, ceremonial hall, civic showpiece, high-level lodging and government meeting place - but one. Home. After a $7 million renovation, designed by Jamie Drake and paid for privately through the Gracie Mansion Conservancy, the four principal downstairs rooms exude a sumptuous Second Empire formality.
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FEATURES
By LIZ SMITH and LIZ SMITH,Tribune Media Services | August 4, 2008
The famed Rodgers & Hammerstein music publishing business, run by Ted Chapin, has put itself on the market for a mere $250 million. This seems like as good a time as any, what with R&H a hit again at Lincoln Center in the brilliant revival of just one of their famous musicals, South Pacific. But Chapin isn't selling his other gold mine - the music of Irving Berlin. Bloomin' Bloomberg His honor the mayor of New York has peripheral publicity this month. Mike Bloomberg's terrific girlfriend, Diana Taylor, is among the rare few on Vanity Fair's best-dressed list.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK DAILY NEWS | May 31, 2001
NEW YORK - Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani has stripped his estranged wife, Donna Hanover, of her chief of staff and sliced the number of officers appointed to her security detail, according to sources. Hacking into Hanover's perks and personnel in the midst of their hostile divorce case, Giuliani ousted Kathleen Madaras, a Hanover loyalist who earns $66,000 a year. Madaras, who once worked in the mayor's office of special projects and events, will be reassigned to another agency, aides said.
NEWS
By David W. Dunlap and David W. Dunlap,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 13, 2002
NEW YORK - Looking far richer but feeling a bit emptier than it has in generations, a thoroughly refreshed Gracie Mansion is beginning its third century cast in every familiar role - historical museum, ceremonial hall, civic showpiece, high-level lodging and government meeting place - but one. Home. After a $7 million renovation, designed by Jamie Drake and paid for privately through the Gracie Mansion Conservancy, the four principal downstairs rooms exude a sumptuous Second Empire formality.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 18, 2001
NEW YORK -- From the city that treats "rude" like a compliment comes a divorce case befitting its reputation -- a very public squabble between the mayor and his estranged wife that rivals "The Producers" as the hottest show in town. The case that has stunned New Yorkers with its rancor pits Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani against his soon-to-be ex-wife, Donna Hanover, over their living arrangements at the official mayoral home, Gracie Mansion. Hanover filed for a restraining order this week to keep the mayor's girlfriend, Judith Nathan, away from the mansion, a city landmark where Giuliani and his wife live in separate quarters.
FEATURES
By LIZ SMITH and LIZ SMITH,Tribune Media Services | August 4, 2008
The famed Rodgers & Hammerstein music publishing business, run by Ted Chapin, has put itself on the market for a mere $250 million. This seems like as good a time as any, what with R&H a hit again at Lincoln Center in the brilliant revival of just one of their famous musicals, South Pacific. But Chapin isn't selling his other gold mine - the music of Irving Berlin. Bloomin' Bloomberg His honor the mayor of New York has peripheral publicity this month. Mike Bloomberg's terrific girlfriend, Diana Taylor, is among the rare few on Vanity Fair's best-dressed list.
NEWS
By RICHARD REEVES | August 24, 1993
New York. -- "Hugs Finest, Thanks God, Loves N.Y.'' was one of the orgy of headlines -- this one in the Daily News -- that celebrated the homecoming of Harvey Weinstein. He is the city's greatest hero because he did what most of us hope to do these days: He survived.And, in case anyone missed the point of why we cheer the kidnapped tuxedo maven imprisoned in a pit along the West Side Highway, we saw the alternate ending along Interstate 95 in North Carolina. James Jordan, the father of the most famous athlete in the country, was shot to death in cold blood because he happened to stop at the wrong spot along the main street of the eastern United States.
FEATURES
By The Christian Science Monitor | March 21, 1993
New YorkWell, mon, here we go.It looks as if we're in the islands. A photo of reggae singer Bob Marley sporting his dreadlocks is superimposed on the green-and-gold Jamaica flag. Huge ceiling fans are ready to provide tropical breezes, which are going to be needed during this meal.Yes, there is lots of heat because the meal is goat that has been jerked. Jerked?Yes, "jerk" -- the Jamaican style of cooking.Jerked food is pork, beef, goat, fish, or chicken that has been marinated for up to 24 hours in a sauce or seasoning usually involving large quantities of allspice, Scotch-bonnet peppers, thyme and ground cinnamon.
NEWS
March 26, 2006
Ladies and Gentlemen, The Bronx Is Burning: 1977, Baseball, Politics, and the Battle for the Soul Of a City By Jonathan Mahler Picador / 356 / $15 The summer of 1977 in New York City in all its garish, roiling, gothic turmoil, the savagery of the Koch-Cuomo battle for Gracie Mansion and the one between Reggie Jackson and Billy Martin for the soul of the Yankees - all this, plus Son of Sam and Studio 54.
BUSINESS
January 18, 1991
NEW YORK -- New York Daily News publisher James Hoge and representatives of its nine striking unions met yesterday at Gracie Mansion at the urging of New York Mayor David N. Dinkins as the clock ticked toward a possible closure or sale of the tabloid.It was the first time Hoge and George McDonald, head of the striking mailers' union and president of the Allied Printing Trades Council, had met since negotiations began nearly a year ago. The unions struck Oct. 25, and the Daily News announced Wednesday that the 72-year-old tabloid would close unless "efficient" settlements are reached soon or a buyer is found.
NEWS
By NEW YORK DAILY NEWS | May 31, 2001
NEW YORK - Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani has stripped his estranged wife, Donna Hanover, of her chief of staff and sliced the number of officers appointed to her security detail, according to sources. Hacking into Hanover's perks and personnel in the midst of their hostile divorce case, Giuliani ousted Kathleen Madaras, a Hanover loyalist who earns $66,000 a year. Madaras, who once worked in the mayor's office of special projects and events, will be reassigned to another agency, aides said.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 18, 2001
NEW YORK -- From the city that treats "rude" like a compliment comes a divorce case befitting its reputation -- a very public squabble between the mayor and his estranged wife that rivals "The Producers" as the hottest show in town. The case that has stunned New Yorkers with its rancor pits Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani against his soon-to-be ex-wife, Donna Hanover, over their living arrangements at the official mayoral home, Gracie Mansion. Hanover filed for a restraining order this week to keep the mayor's girlfriend, Judith Nathan, away from the mansion, a city landmark where Giuliani and his wife live in separate quarters.
NEWS
By RICHARD REEVES | August 24, 1993
New York. -- "Hugs Finest, Thanks God, Loves N.Y.'' was one of the orgy of headlines -- this one in the Daily News -- that celebrated the homecoming of Harvey Weinstein. He is the city's greatest hero because he did what most of us hope to do these days: He survived.And, in case anyone missed the point of why we cheer the kidnapped tuxedo maven imprisoned in a pit along the West Side Highway, we saw the alternate ending along Interstate 95 in North Carolina. James Jordan, the father of the most famous athlete in the country, was shot to death in cold blood because he happened to stop at the wrong spot along the main street of the eastern United States.
FEATURES
By The Christian Science Monitor | March 21, 1993
New YorkWell, mon, here we go.It looks as if we're in the islands. A photo of reggae singer Bob Marley sporting his dreadlocks is superimposed on the green-and-gold Jamaica flag. Huge ceiling fans are ready to provide tropical breezes, which are going to be needed during this meal.Yes, there is lots of heat because the meal is goat that has been jerked. Jerked?Yes, "jerk" -- the Jamaican style of cooking.Jerked food is pork, beef, goat, fish, or chicken that has been marinated for up to 24 hours in a sauce or seasoning usually involving large quantities of allspice, Scotch-bonnet peppers, thyme and ground cinnamon.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 25, 2003
NEW YORK - Rudolph W. Giuliani, the former mayor of New York, and Judith Nathan exchanged vows on the lawn of Gracie Mansion yesterday evening to the strains of "Ave Maria," sung by Ronan Tynan, the Irish tenor. Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg presided over the wedding, an occasion rife with the theatrical flourishes dear to the couple, both opera lovers. Bloomberg, arriving with his companion, Diana Taylor, said before the ceremony that he was not nervous. "I don't have to do a lot," he said.
BUSINESS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | February 4, 1996
The Dream Home feature will periodically visit the homes of notable citizens.Not too many people can say a dream house came with their job.However, for the chancellor of the University of Maryland System, living at Hidden Waters, a three-story brick mansion on 120 acres in Baltimore County, is a condition of employment.In 1988, shortly after Donald N. Langenberg took the position as chancellor, the Board of Regents decided that the chancellor should live there. The board leased the property from the University of Maryland Foundation, a private, not-for-profit that manages gifts to the university.
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