Advertisement
HomeCollectionsGrace Kelly
IN THE NEWS

Grace Kelly

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | December 22, 1995
"The hills are alive with " Come on, you know the rest.* "The Sound of Music" (8 p.m.-11 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- I must be getting softhearted in my advancing years. This movie doesn't seem nearly as insufferable as it used to. True, some of the musical numbers are outrageously sappy, but others are truly beautiful, the scenery gorgeous, Julie Andrews is a wonderful screen presence (no one else could have carried this role off), and Christopher Plummer, who never seems comfortable as Captain Von Trapp, stands in for all of us who wish the movie were a little less frothy (he once commented about working with Ms. Andrews, "It was like getting hit over the head with a greeting card every day")
ARTICLES BY DATE
EXPLORE
July 28, 2011
On July 21, the Forest Hill Swim & Tennis Club dive team's opponent had to forfeit. The team did dive, however, so that the individual divers could continue to earn qualifying scores for the upcoming Central Maryland Dive League Championship meet on July 31. Those earning qualifying scores were Michael Conron, Kelsey Crane, Amanda Federline, Haley Crane, Ian Halk, Philip Drohat, Chris Canipe, Alex Stewart, Ted Kugiowski and TJ Gresham. Results: 6-UG: Maya Proper, 30.90.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | August 5, 1997
Getting the girl. Getting the laugh. Getting the upper hand. Regardless of what he was after, Cary Grant always made getting it look so easy.TCM kicks off a 22-film Cary Grant retrospective tonight with two films he made with the master, Alfred Hitchcock: "North By Northwest" (8 p.m.), in which he gets famously strafed by an airplane, and "To Catch a Thief" (10: 30 p.m.), in which he gets Grace Kelly (lucky guy).Hitchcock no doubt took pleasure in taking a popular favorite like Grant and putting him in peril or making him a little unsavory.
EXPLORE
July 21, 2011
Diving North St. John's, 89; Lochearn, 9 North St. John's results: 6-UG: 1. Christianne Vaxmonsky, 38.80; 2. Reese Collins, 38.10; 3. Abigail Fuller, 34.30; 4. Ana Suri, 25.80. 6-UB: 1. Samuel Kelly, 45.10; 2. Andrew Garman, 22.40. 8-UG: 1. Haley Kampert, 68.90 (Q); 2. Bridget Lang, 63.60 (Q); 3. Megan Duffy, 51.60. 8-UB: 1. Benjamin Kelly, 71.15 (Q); 2. Will Eisentraut, 69.30 (Q). 9-10G: 1. Victoria Hensh, 88.05 (Q)
EXPLORE
July 21, 2011
Diving North St. John's, 89; Lochearn, 9 North St. John's results: 6-UG: 1. Christianne Vaxmonsky, 38.80; 2. Reese Collins, 38.10; 3. Abigail Fuller, 34.30; 4. Ana Suri, 25.80. 6-UB: 1. Samuel Kelly, 45.10; 2. Andrew Garman, 22.40. 8-UG: 1. Haley Kampert, 68.90 (Q); 2. Bridget Lang, 63.60 (Q); 3. Megan Duffy, 51.60. 8-UB: 1. Benjamin Kelly, 71.15 (Q); 2. Will Eisentraut, 69.30 (Q). 9-10G: 1. Victoria Hensh, 88.05 (Q)
FEATURES
By BARBARA THOMAS and BARBARA THOMAS,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 20, 2006
Fashion legend Oleg Cassini will forever be remembered as the man who created the "Jackie look," the signature wardrobe he created for first lady Jacqueline Kennedy in the early 1960s. But the Russian-born designer, who died Friday at age 92, was much more than that: a Hollywood playboy, a savvy businessman and a pioneer in making his own name a sought-after brand. "He understood the power of marketing, branding and licensing, and was one of the first designers to diversify," said Hamish Bowles, Vogue magazine's European editor at large and the fashion historian who curated the 2001 Metropolitan Museum exhibition Jacqueline Kennedy: The White House Years.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | June 5, 1998
"A Perfect Murder," a sleek, chic re-telling of Alfred Hitchcock's "Dial M for Murder," is an altogether respectable adaptation, taking one of the master's least compelling suspense movies and giving it a few extra twists and high gloss -- not to mention a couple of extra corpses.In fact, aside from its '90s-style ending -- which replaces psychological finesse with coarse brutality -- "A Perfect Murder" is, in many ways, better than its antecedent.In the 1954 film, Grace Kelly played a wife who has been cheating on her husband (Ray Milland)
NEWS
By Jamal E. Watson and Jamal E. Watson,SUN STAFF | October 11, 1998
A fire captain who tried to rescue a woman from a burning West Baltimore house last night, despite a delay in pouring water on the blaze, was pulled to safety from a second-story window by one of his colleagues.Capt. Stephan G. Fugate was being treated at the Maryland Shock Trauma Center for second-degree burns on his ears. A 62-year-old woman died in the fire, which broke out about 7: 40 p.m. in the 1000 block of N. Payson St."They couldn't get the hose working, so Captain Fugate just ran into the home without a hose and tried to rescue the woman," said police Officer Chuck Connolly.
FEATURES
By Jo Bremer and Jo Bremer,Sun Staff Writer | October 20, 1994
Robert Lacey's "Grace" is a book that can't seem to decide what it wants to be.Is it a balanced biography of Grace Kelly? A sex-filled expose of a Hollywood starlet? Maybe an investigation into the car wreck that claimed the life of Princess Grace?Unfortunately, it comes closest to being a tawdry strip-show. Mr. Lacey most often exhibits a prurient interest in the sex life of the woman who would marry Prince Ranier of Monaco.Mr. Lacey's account of Kelly's childhood lacks substance. He barely scratches the surface of the character of Jack Kelly, Grace's bricklayer father, who he paints as having enormous influence on the person Grace Kelly was to become.
EXPLORE
July 28, 2011
On July 21, the Forest Hill Swim & Tennis Club dive team's opponent had to forfeit. The team did dive, however, so that the individual divers could continue to earn qualifying scores for the upcoming Central Maryland Dive League Championship meet on July 31. Those earning qualifying scores were Michael Conron, Kelsey Crane, Amanda Federline, Haley Crane, Ian Halk, Philip Drohat, Chris Canipe, Alex Stewart, Ted Kugiowski and TJ Gresham. Results: 6-UG: Maya Proper, 30.90.
FEATURES
By BARBARA THOMAS and BARBARA THOMAS,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 20, 2006
Fashion legend Oleg Cassini will forever be remembered as the man who created the "Jackie look," the signature wardrobe he created for first lady Jacqueline Kennedy in the early 1960s. But the Russian-born designer, who died Friday at age 92, was much more than that: a Hollywood playboy, a savvy businessman and a pioneer in making his own name a sought-after brand. "He understood the power of marketing, branding and licensing, and was one of the first designers to diversify," said Hamish Bowles, Vogue magazine's European editor at large and the fashion historian who curated the 2001 Metropolitan Museum exhibition Jacqueline Kennedy: The White House Years.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | April 4, 2002
In the home of Republican gubernatorial candidate Ross Pierpont, a visitor tries not to spill anything on the white linen tablecloth. But then the candidate himself spills a glass of cold water, which manages to miss the tuna and roast beef sandwiches bought from nearby Graul's Market. The misstep by the 84-year-old Pierpont might easily be the only regret the candidate will have in this his 16th campaign. When he assesses the 2002 gubernatorial race, the Woodlawn native and former surgeon will say he had no regrets about running.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,Sun Film Critic | March 12, 2000
I don't remember when I first saw "Rear Window." But clearly I was at a formative age. To this day, Alfred Hitchcock's film, which was released in 1954, remains for me an indelible, transfixing, endlessly fascinating exercise in the power of the cinema to seduce, coerce and just plain entertain. I can't tell you how many times I've seen "Rear Window," either. A dozen? Two dozen? It doesn't matter, because each time I see it, it's for the first time. Hitchcock packed so much expression and information into every single shot of the movie that it provides endlessly rewarding reading.
FEATURES
By Alice Steinbach and Alice Steinbach,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 21, 1999
VENICE -- Fashion is a cruel mistress, never more so than when one is traveling. It is, after all, a truth universally acknowledged that most tourists -- with the possible exception of the late Grace Kelly -- never have the right wardrobe, regardless of how carefully they pack.It is not just a matter of weather-preparedness and comfort; it is also the letdown one feels upon arriving in a stylish city such as Venice only to find oneself hopelessly out-of-fashion.At least this has been the experience of one American in Venice -- we shall call her Signora S. -- who sits now trying on shoes in a trendy shop called Prada.
NEWS
By Jamal E. Watson and Jamal E. Watson,SUN STAFF | October 11, 1998
A fire captain who tried to rescue a woman from a burning West Baltimore house last night, despite a delay in pouring water on the blaze, was pulled to safety from a second-story window by one of his colleagues.Capt. Stephan G. Fugate was being treated at the Maryland Shock Trauma Center for second-degree burns on his ears. A 62-year-old woman died in the fire, which broke out about 7: 40 p.m. in the 1000 block of N. Payson St."They couldn't get the hose working, so Captain Fugate just ran into the home without a hose and tried to rescue the woman," said police Officer Chuck Connolly.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | June 5, 1998
"A Perfect Murder," a sleek, chic re-telling of Alfred Hitchcock's "Dial M for Murder," is an altogether respectable adaptation, taking one of the master's least compelling suspense movies and giving it a few extra twists and high gloss -- not to mention a couple of extra corpses.In fact, aside from its '90s-style ending -- which replaces psychological finesse with coarse brutality -- "A Perfect Murder" is, in many ways, better than its antecedent.In the 1954 film, Grace Kelly played a wife who has been cheating on her husband (Ray Milland)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,Sun Film Critic | March 12, 2000
I don't remember when I first saw "Rear Window." But clearly I was at a formative age. To this day, Alfred Hitchcock's film, which was released in 1954, remains for me an indelible, transfixing, endlessly fascinating exercise in the power of the cinema to seduce, coerce and just plain entertain. I can't tell you how many times I've seen "Rear Window," either. A dozen? Two dozen? It doesn't matter, because each time I see it, it's for the first time. Hitchcock packed so much expression and information into every single shot of the movie that it provides endlessly rewarding reading.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | May 30, 1994
Letters, calls and the roar of the crowd:Herman I. Milovitz, Pikesville: I have some advice for you, Roger: STOP BEATING A DEAD HORSE!I have some news for you, Roger: Bill and Hillary Clinton are ARE NOT GODS! They're NOT ROYALTY! They're NOT SAINTS! They're HUMAN!I have more news for you, Roger: The people, the voters, don't need journalists like you "bugging" them with character assassination over and over and over. THE VOTERS ARE NOT STUPID!So, rather than engage in "shlock" journalism, why don't you criticize Bill Clinton on more pertinent subjects.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | August 5, 1997
Getting the girl. Getting the laugh. Getting the upper hand. Regardless of what he was after, Cary Grant always made getting it look so easy.TCM kicks off a 22-film Cary Grant retrospective tonight with two films he made with the master, Alfred Hitchcock: "North By Northwest" (8 p.m.), in which he gets famously strafed by an airplane, and "To Catch a Thief" (10: 30 p.m.), in which he gets Grace Kelly (lucky guy).Hitchcock no doubt took pleasure in taking a popular favorite like Grant and putting him in peril or making him a little unsavory.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | December 22, 1995
"The hills are alive with " Come on, you know the rest.* "The Sound of Music" (8 p.m.-11 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- I must be getting softhearted in my advancing years. This movie doesn't seem nearly as insufferable as it used to. True, some of the musical numbers are outrageously sappy, but others are truly beautiful, the scenery gorgeous, Julie Andrews is a wonderful screen presence (no one else could have carried this role off), and Christopher Plummer, who never seems comfortable as Captain Von Trapp, stands in for all of us who wish the movie were a little less frothy (he once commented about working with Ms. Andrews, "It was like getting hit over the head with a greeting card every day")
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.