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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | November 1, 1990
"Grace Hartigan: New Paintings and Works on Paper" at the C. Grimaldis Gallery (through Dec. 1) leaves a number of impressions but the primary one is of freedom. Hartigan was always a strong painter, but at times there was a sense of struggle about her work, a feeling of self-imposed order which was to some degree at odds with her essence as a painter.Sometimes this imposed order took the form of subject matter. Even at their most abstract, Hartigan's paintings had subject matter, but there were times, particularly in the 1970s and with some of the history-of-art works, when subject matter became so intrusive that the works became too descriptive.
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2012
Mina Cheon is used to seeing things from multiple perspectives. As a child in South Korea, the artist was exposed to two religious philosophies — Buddhist on her father's side, Christian on her mother's — and embraced a third as an adult, converting to Judaism when she married a Baltimore architect. When she started studying in 1997 with the celebrated abstract expressionist Grace Hartigan at the Maryland Institute College of Art , Cheon focused on traditional painting methods.
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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | August 15, 1993
At 71, Grace Hartigan is still, as she always has been, a searcher. She greets a visitor to her Fells Point studio and living space, in the city she has called home since 1960, and announces that her work is undergoing yet another major change. She's left the Seurat-like, pointillist style in which she was working for several years and is now doing paintings with much more drawing in them. Her work in the pointillist style, though, was hailed as some of her best work in decades, so she's taking a big chance.
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By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2010
Betty Piskor, a Canton historian and Polish heritage advocate who belonged to the band of activists who fought a planned Interstate highway through her Southeast Baltimore neighborhood, died Wednesday at the Johns Hopkins Hospital of complications from surgery. She was 82 years old and had lived on Fait Avenue for nearly six decades. Born Betty Wlodarski in Pittsburgh, she was fifth of eight children and was raised in orphanages and foster homes throughout most of her youth. She moved to Southeast Baltimore when she was 16 to care for the children of her sister Catherine, who found herself stranded here when the sponsor of a marathon dance contest skipped town with prize money she had been promised.
NEWS
November 18, 2008
Grace Hartigan, the renowned artist and educator who died over the weekend at the age of 86, was a painter's painter. "The thing that's been incredible is that one way or another, I've been able to arrange my life so that I could paint every day," she told The Sun in a 2001 interview. "I have great plans to live as long as Georgia O'Keeffe," she added. Ms. O'Keeffe lived to 98, and Ms. Hartigan said she needed the time because "there's a lot of work I still want to do." Ms. Hartigan was not granted that wish, but what she accomplished over a career spanning more than six decades was little short of astonishing.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,SUN STAFF | November 23, 2003
Grace Hartigan held court Thursday evening at Maryland Institute College of Art's new Brown Center. It was the first time since the mid-1980's that the artist has addressed a large audience in Baltimore, and her thoughts on life, influences and art fell on the adoring ears of about 350 art students, faculty, trustees and friends. Though she wore all black and sat to the side of the stage, her colorful presence and personality seemed to fill the room. "She's a legend," said Carrie Fuclie, a MICA student who arrived before the doors opened.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | December 19, 2007
What do Josephine Baker, Amelie Matisse and Lili Marlene have in common? Aside from their aura of European sophistication and glamour, they're all featured subjects in New Paintings, a lively exhibition of recent work by Baltimore master Grace Hartigan at C. Grimaldis Gallery. Over the years, Hartigan has repeatedly returned for inspiration to famous women from history, legend and the history of art. She was a leading member of the New York School of Abstract-Expressionist painters during the 1950s, and her subsequent work remains an inventive mix of delightful human forms and pure abstraction.
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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | December 9, 1997
In her new show at the C. Grimaldis Gallery, painter Grace Hartigan remains true to herself, which means that she's not doing the same old thing. At 75, she's reinventing her art as energetically and imaginatively as ever.Through a distinguished career that now spans half a century, one of the constants of Hartigan's work has been change. Even when her followers have wished she would linger longer with a particular subject matter or style -- as with her much-admired pointillist period of the late 1980s and early 1990s -- she has felt the need to move on. Here, she introduces not one but two new series, the "Stars" of American popular culture that she produced in 1996 and earlier this year, and the more recent "Gods" (Greek and Roman)
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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | November 3, 1997
In the 1880s, French artist Georges Seurat developed a system of applying paint to canvas in tiny dots that became known as pointillism. His greatest work, "Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte," is at the Chicago Art Institute. In 1988, after seeing it, abstract expressionist painter Grace Hartigan began to employ a dotting technique in her own work.She created paintings in this style until 1993, and has since referred to those years as her "abstract expressionist pointillist" period.
NEWS
By MARY CAROLE MCCAULEY and MARY CAROLE MCCAULEY,SUN REPORTER | April 2, 2006
WHEN GRACE HARTIGAN WAS A LITTLE girl, she was bewitched by gypsies. In the 1930s, the Travelers still roamed the countryside in nomadic caravans, and young Grace would shinny up the apple tree in her parents' backyard in Newark, N.J., to spy on them. She spent hours watching the women in colorful skirts and big hoop earrings telling fortunes, the men sharpening their knives. GRACE HARTIGAN: PORTRAITS FROM THE MASTERS, NEW PAINTINGS / / Exhibit runs through April 29 / / C. Grimaldis Gallery, 523 N. Charles St. / / Admission is free / / Call 410-539-1080 or visit cgrimaldisgallery.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 2010
SATURDAY MURDER MYSTERY: The Holiday Inn Inner Harbor, 301 W. Lombard St., holds a murder mystery event on the second Saturday of every month. Think Clue set to music with added laughs and you have a good idea what to expect from the Maryland-based troupe, Whodunnit for Hire. Tickets are $75 for a meal, a drink, the show and parking. Call 410-637-4625 or go to whodunnitforhire.com. FRONTIERS: "The World's Greatest Journey Tribute" comes to Rams Head Live, 20 Market Place, to perform such soundtrack staples as "Don't Stop Believin.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 2008
FILM 'It's a Wonderful Life' The Senator Theatre hosts its annual benefit for the GEDCO CARES Food pantry Sunday with its traditional double-bill. You can view Frank Capra's It's A Wonderful Life (11 a.m., 3:45 p.m., 8:30 p.m.) either as a heartwarming tale of a well-spent life or a devastating account of an existence so miserable that only the intervention of an angel can redeem it (James Stewart, who stars, is so good it works either way). Then exult in the pathos-streaked exuberance of the premium 1951 British version of Dickens' A Christmas Carol, starring Alastair Sim as Scrooge (1:45 p.m., 6:30 p.m.)
NEWS
November 18, 2008
Grace Hartigan, the renowned artist and educator who died over the weekend at the age of 86, was a painter's painter. "The thing that's been incredible is that one way or another, I've been able to arrange my life so that I could paint every day," she told The Sun in a 2001 interview. "I have great plans to live as long as Georgia O'Keeffe," she added. Ms. O'Keeffe lived to 98, and Ms. Hartigan said she needed the time because "there's a lot of work I still want to do." Ms. Hartigan was not granted that wish, but what she accomplished over a career spanning more than six decades was little short of astonishing.
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | November 17, 2008
Before she passed away Saturday after a long illness, Grace Hartigan was adamant, even imperious about the arrangements for how she would be memorialized. And she will get her way, as Hartigan, a seminal figure in the U.S. art world and a longtime Baltimore resident, usually did. "There will be no memorial service. She said that her memorial should be more about her body of work than about her physical body. She's always felt that way," says Rex Stevens, chairman of the drawing and general fine arts department at the Maryland Institute College of Art. The 86-year-old painter will be cremated, he said.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | November 16, 2008
Her bold canvases made her a bright star in the 1950s New York art world, but she "sank from view faster than the Titanic" when she moved to Baltimore, The New York Times said. Grace Hartigan, who ultimately found a second career offering her wisdom and advice to generations of young painters at the Maryland Institute College of Art, died of liver failure yesterday at the Lorien Mays Chapel nursing home. She was 86. "I feel that I am an aristocrat as far as painting is concerned; I believe in beautiful drawing, in elegance, in luminous color and light," she said in a 1990 biography.
NEWS
By Ed Gunts | September 19, 2008
The Maryland Institute College of Art will hold the world premiere of a 36-minute documentary about Maryland artist and educator Grace Hartigan at 7:30 p.m. tomorrow at the Brown Center, 1301 Mount Royal Ave. Grace Hartigan - Shattering Boundaries, features studio interviews with Hartigan, the director of MICA's Hoffberger School of Painting since 1965, and artists she has influenced over the years. The reservations-only event includes a question-and-answer session with co-producers Janice Stanton and Alice Shure of Amici Films, as well as a reception.
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | November 17, 2008
Before she passed away Saturday after a long illness, Grace Hartigan was adamant, even imperious about the arrangements for how she would be memorialized. And she will get her way, as Hartigan, a seminal figure in the U.S. art world and a longtime Baltimore resident, usually did. "There will be no memorial service. She said that her memorial should be more about her body of work than about her physical body. She's always felt that way," says Rex Stevens, chairman of the drawing and general fine arts department at the Maryland Institute College of Art. The 86-year-old painter will be cremated, he said.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | December 5, 1995
Throughout her career, Grace Hartigan has repeatedly mined history and art history for inspiration. She has done it again for her latest show, a group of large- and medium-scaled watercolors collectively titled "The Medieval Hunt." The results are impressive and show the artist continuing to pursue new developments.Not strictly confined to the hunt, the show's 13 works contain both hunt scenes and individual figures. A few of these are based on specific pictures, such as her "Man with Red Hat," based on Hans Memling's "Portrait of a Man," but most are composites drawn from several sources.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | December 19, 2007
What do Josephine Baker, Amelie Matisse and Lili Marlene have in common? Aside from their aura of European sophistication and glamour, they're all featured subjects in New Paintings, a lively exhibition of recent work by Baltimore master Grace Hartigan at C. Grimaldis Gallery. Over the years, Hartigan has repeatedly returned for inspiration to famous women from history, legend and the history of art. She was a leading member of the New York School of Abstract-Expressionist painters during the 1950s, and her subsequent work remains an inventive mix of delightful human forms and pure abstraction.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 2007
The lowdown -- Catch the gallery talk for the exhibition Time and Measure today at Maryland Art Place. Join participating artists R.L. Croft, Kevin Wolf and Christopher Whittey as they explain the exhibit and their works. If you go -- The talk will be at 6 p.m. today with a 7 p.m. reception. Time and Measure runs through Dec. 22. Maryland Art Place is at 8 Market Place, Suite 100. [ANDREA GROSSMAN] Grace Hartigan The lowdown -- Don't miss Grace Hartigan: New Painting, a new exhibit at C.
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