Advertisement
HomeCollectionsGowdy
IN THE NEWS

Gowdy

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
By Milton Kent | November 5, 1998
As improbable as the success of an all-sports, all-the-time cable channel like ESPN must have seemed 20 years ago, so, too, must the rise of a balding, then-recently fired college basketball coach named Dick Vitale.Yet, two decades after the new channel took a chance on Vitale, he stands as one of the most popular figures in sports television, not to mention this year's recipient of the Basketball Hall of Fame's Curt Gowdy Award for his work as an analyst."I'm just flabbergasted and honored.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | February 26, 2006
Growing up in the wilds of northern New Jersey four decades ago, I wanted to be the next Curt Gowdy. Not the one who was the voice of so many famous sporting events, including the 1969 Colts-Jets Super Bowl and the Orioles-Mets World Series of the same year. I wanted someday to be the host of ABC's The American Sportsman. Every year, from the time I was little, my father and I would plop ourselves down in front of the TV in the coldest winter months and let Gowdy take us to faraway places to fish and hunt with famous people we could never hope to meet.
Advertisement
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | July 11, 1995
Even if he wanted to, Curt Gowdy Jr. couldn't run away from his famous lineage.Not long after he is introduced to people, particularly in his native New England, Gowdy, who will produce tonight's All-Star Game telecast for ABC (Chs. 2, 7, 8 p.m.), inevitably is treated to stories about his famous father.But, far from trying to escape the lengthy shadow of Gowdy pere -- the Hall of Fame announcer for the Boston Red Sox and three networks, not to mention host of the longtime "American Sportsman" outdoors series -- Gowdy fils embraces it."
SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | February 22, 2006
Before he came to Baltimore, Ted Patterson worked two years for the late Curt Gowdy on his NBC radio show. Patterson said he would conduct interviews that aired on the program. Because the interviewees supposedly were talking with Gowdy, Patterson said he would show up at games wearing a sign that said, "Call me Curt." ray.frager@baltsun.com Read Ray Frager's blog at baltimoresun.com/mediumwell
SPORTS
By Milton Kent | May 17, 1996
Those who work in live television know it to be the ultimate high-wire walk that usually pays off handsomely, but occasionally brings a big fall.That's the precise sensation ABC experienced at the Kentucky Derby two weeks ago, when it nailed down every aspect of the Run for the Roses, except for the result.As Grindstone and Cavonnier hit the wire virtually together, Churchill Downs track stewards were unable to ascertain immediately who won, and the network waited and waited for a winner to be declared before breaking for a commercial.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | August 17, 2003
There's not enough room on a business card to list all the awards and titles accumulated by Lefty Kreh and Roland Martin. But then in the outdoors world, neither fisherman needs much of an introduction. Books, TV shows, seminars, videos. Heck, they could probably make a killing doing the greetings on people's answering machines. Can you just imagine it: "Hi, this is Lefty Kreh. No one is home right now, but did you hear the one about the minister, rabbi and priest out golfing?" With the number of jokes he knows, Kreh could give each person an individualized greeting.
NEWS
By EDWARD LEE AND KATHERINE DUNN and EDWARD LEE AND KATHERINE DUNN,SUN REPORTERS | February 1, 2006
After a quiet first half of the indoor track and field season, Garnell Hall is making some noise - again. The Catonsville senior's second-place time of 22.09 seconds in the 200-meter dash at the Hispanic Games last month is the third-fastest time in the country, according to dyestat.com, a Web site for track and field and cross country. Hall, who also is tied for the second-fastest time in the 300 (36.1 seconds) among Baltimore area athletes, has been in the national spotlight. As a junior at Mount St. Joseph last winter, he was ranked 20th and 33rd in the country in the 200 and 400, respectively.
SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | February 22, 2006
Before he came to Baltimore, Ted Patterson worked two years for the late Curt Gowdy on his NBC radio show. Patterson said he would conduct interviews that aired on the program. Because the interviewees supposedly were talking with Gowdy, Patterson said he would show up at games wearing a sign that said, "Call me Curt." ray.frager@baltsun.com Read Ray Frager's blog at baltimoresun.com/mediumwell
NEWS
February 2, 2004
On January 29, 2004 CHARLES NORMAN ANDREAE JR., beloved husband of Virginia White Andreae and the late Jean Gowdy Andreae; devoted father of C. N. "Chip" Andreae III, Mary Stuart Gephart, Ginger N. Novak and Sally N. McCabe; devoted grandfather of Chas, Taylor, Mollie, Graham, Alex, Charlie, Ginna, Matt, Norris, Catherine and Will. Friends may call at the family owned Mitchell-Wiedefeld Funeral Home Inc., 6500 York Rd (at Overbrook), on Monday 3 to 6 p.m. A Funeral Service will be held Tuesday 11 a.m. at Roland Park Presbyterian Church.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | February 17, 2000
UNTIL RECENTLY, I was pretty much convinced that fishing was the most boring activity in the world. For me, fishing is always this: You bait the hook, throw the line in the water, and that's about it, action-wise. Because most of the time, the fish aren't biting. So you end up staring at the water for hours and getting a headache from the sun. And then you go home. Anyway, as I said, I didn't think anything could be more boring than that. But I was wrong. Because if you think fishing is boring, try watching these fishing shows on TV. With all these shows, the format is pretty much the same.
SPORTS
By MIKE KLINGAMAN AND KEN MURRAY and MIKE KLINGAMAN AND KEN MURRAY,SUN REPORTERS | February 21, 2006
With an unassuming style and a folksy manner, sportscaster Curt Gowdy never allowed himself to become more important than the games he covered. For Gowdy, understatement was the goal, and it made him a favorite with audiences of all sports, extending to the players he covered. When Gowdy died yesterday at age 86 after a bout with leukemia, he was remembered as much for what he wasn't in the broadcast booth as for the epic events he described. "Curt's style? Kind of like he was sitting next to you on the couch," said Orioles Hall of Fame pitcher Jim Palmer.
NEWS
By EDWARD LEE AND KATHERINE DUNN and EDWARD LEE AND KATHERINE DUNN,SUN REPORTERS | February 1, 2006
After a quiet first half of the indoor track and field season, Garnell Hall is making some noise - again. The Catonsville senior's second-place time of 22.09 seconds in the 200-meter dash at the Hispanic Games last month is the third-fastest time in the country, according to dyestat.com, a Web site for track and field and cross country. Hall, who also is tied for the second-fastest time in the 300 (36.1 seconds) among Baltimore area athletes, has been in the national spotlight. As a junior at Mount St. Joseph last winter, he was ranked 20th and 33rd in the country in the 200 and 400, respectively.
SPORTS
By Rich Scherr and Rich Scherr,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 13, 2005
There was nearly a minute to play in last night's Class 1A girls basketball state championship game, but to Pam Wright, the chance to cast aside years of frustration couldn't wait another moment. Clad from head to toe in pink, the New Town coach, who guided Milford Mill to the state final each year from 1998 to 2003 only to come up empty, threw her hands into the air and strutted up and down the sideline at UMBC's RAC Arena. She knew her Titans were on the brink of history. With a 62-53 win over Southside, New Town (25-2)
NEWS
February 2, 2004
On January 29, 2004 CHARLES NORMAN ANDREAE JR., beloved husband of Virginia White Andreae and the late Jean Gowdy Andreae; devoted father of C. N. "Chip" Andreae III, Mary Stuart Gephart, Ginger N. Novak and Sally N. McCabe; devoted grandfather of Chas, Taylor, Mollie, Graham, Alex, Charlie, Ginna, Matt, Norris, Catherine and Will. Friends may call at the family owned Mitchell-Wiedefeld Funeral Home Inc., 6500 York Rd (at Overbrook), on Monday 3 to 6 p.m. A Funeral Service will be held Tuesday 11 a.m. at Roland Park Presbyterian Church.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | August 17, 2003
There's not enough room on a business card to list all the awards and titles accumulated by Lefty Kreh and Roland Martin. But then in the outdoors world, neither fisherman needs much of an introduction. Books, TV shows, seminars, videos. Heck, they could probably make a killing doing the greetings on people's answering machines. Can you just imagine it: "Hi, this is Lefty Kreh. No one is home right now, but did you hear the one about the minister, rabbi and priest out golfing?" With the number of jokes he knows, Kreh could give each person an individualized greeting.
SPORTS
September 28, 2002
SPRINGFIELD, Mass. - This was a prize that Magic Johnson and Larry Bird could share. Johnson was inducted into the Basketball Hall of Fame last night, reunited with his former rival in a ceremony that evoked tears for the late Drazen Petrovic and laughs for the antics of the Harlem Globetrotters before the star of showtime stole the show. "You allowed me for 12 or 13 years to be a little boy, to play the game I love, to try to be the best player I could be, to try to win games, and to also turn the fans on," Johnson told commissioner David Stern between standing ovations.
NEWS
By MILTON KENT | May 19, 1996
Just as the fog and mist broke around Pimlico yesterday to produce a sunny day, the fog and mist that permeated ABC's coverage of the Kentucky Derby two weeks ago were swept away in an understated, but brilliant production of the Preakness.The network won as big as Preakness winner Louis Quatorze, who likewise bounced back from a subpar Derby, with exceptional pictures and brilliant words in a lean, but effective telecast.Producer Curt Gowdy Jr. bore the brunt of a critical beating for not only taking the network away before the Derby winner could be declared, but also for presenting a telecast allegedly unsatisfying for the serious horseplayer.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent | May 1, 1998
With 26 cameras and 75 camera positions around Louisville's Churchill Downs, from the paddock to the jockey's room to the stables and from above it all in a blimp, ABC producer Curt Gowdy Jr. has more than enough equipment to visually tell the story of tomorrow's 124th running of the Kentucky Derby.But that doesn't mean that Gowdy is satisfied. The Emmy Award-winning producer and son of the Hall of Fame announcer is hoping that one of tomorrow's jockeys will wear the one-pound camera that goes on their cap and provides such a terrific perspective for the home viewer.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | July 28, 2002
BIRMINGHAM, Ala. - ESPN hopes to tap into the future of outdoors sports shows by taking a page from the past. This fall, the sports network will debut The New American Sportsman as the centerpiece of a prime-time block of shows on ESPN2 targeted at anglers, hunters and campers. The hour-long show is an update of The American Sportsman that was hosted by Curt Gowdy from the 1960s to the 1980s. The program followed celebrities on adventures around the world. A preview of the new show featured actor Greg Kinnear on a photo safari to watch scientists track the migration of rhinos and golfer Jack Nicklaus tarpon fishing.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | February 17, 2000
UNTIL RECENTLY, I was pretty much convinced that fishing was the most boring activity in the world. For me, fishing is always this: You bait the hook, throw the line in the water, and that's about it, action-wise. Because most of the time, the fish aren't biting. So you end up staring at the water for hours and getting a headache from the sun. And then you go home. Anyway, as I said, I didn't think anything could be more boring than that. But I was wrong. Because if you think fishing is boring, try watching these fishing shows on TV. With all these shows, the format is pretty much the same.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.