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By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | July 8, 2000
Guns, growth and dead fish have given Gov. Parris N. Glendening fleeting moments on the national stage. Now he's about to get a year in the political spotlight. Members of the National Governors' Association will gather today in State College, Pa., for a four-day conference that will conclude Tuesday with Glendening taking the reins of the organization. He becomes the first Marylander to chair the NGA since Marvin Mandel in 1972-1973. Glendening plans to use his year as chairman to acquaint the nation with a phrase he has made commonplace in Maryland: Smart Growth.
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NEWS
August 12, 2013
The Democratic Governors Association wants to conduct federal electioneering activity - things like get-out-the vote campaigns and voter identification programs - but it wants to do it with money that isn't subject to federal campaign finance restrictions. The group, which bears the strong stamp of Gov. Martin O'Malley, is attempting to do that by exploiting a loophole in campaign regulations that, even if legal, is stunningly cynical. The Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act of 2002 - better known as the McCain-Feingold act - bars an "association or similar group of candidates for state or local office or individuals holding state or local office" from conducting federal electioneering activity with non-federal funds.
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NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Washington Bureau of The Sun | February 6, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Gov. William Donald Schaefer received some support yesterday from fellow chief executives for his plan to ban assault weapons at the state and federal level, although officials acknowledge that the controversial proposal will have a difficult time passing the National Governors' Association.Mr. Schaefer, who has introduced legislation in Maryland that would ban assault weapons, picked up endorsements on his nationwide plan from Govs. James J. Florio of New Jersey, George A. Sinner of North Dakota and John Waihee III of Hawaii.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | August 10, 2013
The Democratic Governors Association is seeking a ruling that would allow it to expand its role in federal elections as its chief fundraiser, Gov. Martin O'Malley, is considering a run for president, documents filed with the Federal Election Commission show. In a case that could be decided as early as this month, the Washington-based governors group is seeking to increase its ability to perform voter registration and get-out-the-vote efforts in gubernatorial races - and its leadership stresses that it has no intention of engaging in campaigns for Congress or the White House.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Staff Writer | August 2, 1992
PRINCETON, N.J. -- Presidential candidate Bill Clinton, bolstered by strong endorsements from fellow Democratic governors, responded punch for punch yesterday to a new Republican ad that belittles his record as governor of Arkansas.The yet-to-be-aired ad reportedly declares that Mr. Clinton is "a failed governor from a small state."Mr. Clinton, flanked by 17 Democratic colleagues who assembled here for today's start of the 84th annual meeting of the National Governors' Association, replied: "I think I'm running against a failed president of a big country."
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 6, 2001
PROVIDENCE, R.I. --- Maryland's anti-sprawl efforts received a national audience yesterday when Gov. Parris N. Glendening unveiled an eight-minute video at a session of the National Governors' Association, of which he is chairman. The video highlighted redevelopment efforts in Bladensburg, new development in Gaithersburg and farmland preservation. It was shown on C-SPAN, the public affairs cable network. Glendening also gave his colleagues hand-held computers loaded with software that allows governors to research growth initiatives in other states.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 23, 1997
MIAMI -- Fresh from victories in Virginia and New Jersey, Republican governors met in Miami over the weekend to plot strategy for 36 gubernatorial elections in 1998. They declared that education would be the next issue they would use to try to move power from Washington to the states.On top of the Republicans' education agenda is a request that Congress and the Department of Education eliminate federally required paperwork and regulations on schools."What we want Congress to do with education is exactly what it did with welfare three years ago," said South Carolina Gov. David Beasley, the incoming chairman of the Republican Governors' Association.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 30, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Uncertain whether Congress will adopt a national health insurance program this year, leaders of the National Governors' Association are seeking new power to tax ++ and regulate the health plans of large corporations so the states can forge ahead on their own if the federal government fails to act.At a four-day meeting that began yesterday, the governors are expected to adopt the new policy, over strenuous objections from many business executives...
NEWS
By J.H. Snider | April 12, 2001
WASHINGTON - The National Governors Association reported recently that the annual cost to society of traffic gridlock is $72 billion in wasted time and fuel as well as 4.3 billion hours stuck in traffic. And gridlock is getting worse. Politicians know that traffic gridlock is unpopular and that the public expects them to alleviate it. They also know that people only want traffic efficiency - like garbage dumps, power plants, and cell-phone towers - in someone else's back yard. The National Governors Association report, subtitled "Delivering More Transportation Choices to Break Gridlock," reflects this political calculus.
NEWS
November 21, 2000
A ONE-TIME university professor and now head of the National Governors Association, Parris N. Glendening no doubt relishes his role as instructor of the nation's newly elected governors. He tells them, no doubt, that timely attention to the nuts and bolts of state business is fundamental. Yet, he hasn't met that standard himself lately. On the road 32 days since Sept. 1, the governor hasn't attended a meeting of Maryland's Board of Public Works in five weeks. He rescheduled last week's meeting so he could be with the new governors in Utah.
NEWS
April 14, 2013
The knock on Gov. Martin O'Malley by his critics is that everything he does is an effort to pad his resume for a presumed run for president. The latest evidence: He enacted Maryland's most sweeping gun control measures in a generation, abolished the death penalty, secured the most significant boost in state transportation funding since the Schaefer administration, laid the groundwork for a wind farm off the Ocean City coast, passed legislation that...
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | December 2, 2012
President Barack Obama no longer needs Gov. Martin O'Malley as a top campaign surrogate, and the Democratic Governors Association is set to elect someone else as its chairman on Monday when the group meets in Los Angeles. But neither development is likely to push Maryland's governor off the national stage. "Once you achieve a certain stature, which I believe O'Malley has, then you are going to remain a sought-after speaker, surrogate, television guest," said Anita Dunn, a national political consultant who was an adviser to the Obama campaign.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | February 2, 2012
Companies seeking lucrative state contracts and business deals in Maryland made five- and six-figure contributions in recent months to a Democratic governors group led by Gov. Martin O'Malley, federal records show. Firms making large gifts to the Democratic Governors Association in the last six months of 2011 include bidders for a $2.4 billion state employee health contract, a $56 million deal to rebuild highway rest stops and the license to run Baltimore's slots casino. O'Malley, who has been the association's chairman since December 2010, has said the contributions have nothing to do with his decisions as governor.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | December 10, 2010
Martin O'Malley was selected by his peers Wednesday to chair the Democratic Governors Association, a platform from which he says he will build the party and promote candidates who will invest in education and infrastructure. "Our agenda is one of creating jobs," O'Malley said. "That is what our agenda is. It is about the agenda of each of our states. " He also said the group would not "run away" from progressive values. O'Malley, who begins his second and final term as governor in January, deflected questions about whether the new role indicates ambitions beyond Maryland.
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,laura.smitherman@baltsun.com | July 30, 2009
The nation's lieutenant governors, more in the limelight in recent months than their second-in-command status usually affords them, are gathering in Maryland this week for a conference to brush up on policy skills. The National Lieutenant Governors Association is holding its annual meeting through Friday at Baltimore's InterContinental Hotel. About 120 attendees, including two dozen lieutenant governors and others who may not hold that title but are first in the line of succession to governors in states and U.S. territories.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 25, 2007
WASHINGTON -- As the National Governors Association began its winter meeting, 13 governors expressed alarm yesterday that they were about to run out of federal money for a popular program that provides health insurance to children. They appealed to Congress and the Bush administration for swift action to protect hundreds of thousands of children who could lose benefits. The full association is poised to endorse that appeal. In a letter to Democratic and Republican leaders of Congress, the 13 governors said that "health insurance for some of our states' most vulnerable citizens is in jeopardy."
NEWS
February 3, 1994
Half the nation's governors are expected to run for re-election this year. For two Republicans, 1994 could be a trial run for a presidential bid in 1996.One is Gov. Pete Wilson of California. His four years as chief executive have been a disaster in California, literally. There have been earthquakes, devastating forest fires, a terrible riot; and the state's economy, especially in the populous south, is still not rising out of the recession apace with most of the rest of the nation.Governor Wilson said this week in Washington, where the National Governors' Association was meeting, that he should not be included on the presidential sweepstakes lists, because if re-elected he wants to focus on getting his state back on the road to better times.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 25, 2007
WASHINGTON -- As the National Governors Association began its winter meeting, 13 governors expressed alarm yesterday that they were about to run out of federal money for a popular program that provides health insurance to children. They appealed to Congress and the Bush administration for swift action to protect hundreds of thousands of children who could lose benefits. The full association is poised to endorse that appeal. In a letter to Democratic and Republican leaders of Congress, the 13 governors said that "health insurance for some of our states' most vulnerable citizens is in jeopardy."
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