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NEWS
June 11, 1994
On Wednesday, hours after the votes were counted in the California primary, Republican Gov. Pete Wilson began the general election campaign with new television commercials. His opponent, Kathleen Brown (daughter of ex-guv Pat, brother of ex-guv Jerry), was way ahead of him. She won the Democratic nomination by running against his record, rather than her primary opponents.This is the most important gubernatorial race of 1994. It is important for two reasons. The first is the major party candidates and their natural constituencies have starkly contrasting views on the direction the state must take.
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NEWS
By Jack Germond & Jules Witcover | August 9, 1996
SAN DIEGO -- A year ago, Gov. Pete Wilson of California had hopes of coming here to the Republican National Convention to receive his party's 1996 presidential nomination. Instead, he has come as the convention's most prominent fly in the ointment on the abortion issue.Last August, Governor Wilson formally declared his candidacy for the nomination but a series of mishaps, political and personal, persuaded him in late September to withdraw. He was mired in single digits in the horserace polls and was struggling to raise money and to overcome the after-effects of throat surgery that made him a rasping, ineffective campaigner.
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NEWS
By GEORGE F. WILL | September 24, 1992
"Dear Governor Wilson: If no one likes you then no one will vote for you. The teachers are going to go on strike. You better shape up or bye-bye you're out of there.''California's continuing crisis is America's most portentous political story. Pete Wilson's gritty response to it is a stunning contrast to the evasions of the presidential candidates concerning the nation's comparable crisis. An introduction to California's crisis, and Governor Wilson's response, is that ''you better shape up'' letter to him. It is from a third-grader.
NEWS
By BEN WATTENBERG | September 8, 1995
Washington. -- Asegment on CNN's ''Capitol Gang'' dealt with the recent announcement of presidential candidacy by California's Gov. Pete Wilson, which was delivered in front of the Statue of Liberty.The video clips showed the candidate criticizing a welfare system that offers extra money to recipients who have additional children while on welfare, decrying the fact that law-abiding Americans fear to go outside because of street crime, deploring an affirmative-action process that has evolved into de facto quotas and condemning the porous border control that allows a steady stream of illegal immigrants into America.
NEWS
August 30, 1995
Depending on how you look at it, California Gov. Pete Wilson either turned his back on the Statue of Liberty or embraced what she stands for -- legal immigration. "There is a right way to come to America and a wrong way," he said in New York as he announced his candidacy for president. "Illegal immigration is not the American way."Almost everyone agrees with that. And in fact many voters agree that legal immigration needs to be curbed.The Clinton administration has come out for reducing the number of refugees admitted into the country each year.
NEWS
November 7, 1994
Voting on state initiatives usually has local political implications only, but the vote on what Californians call Prop 187 will have national impact. It bans education, health and employment benefits for illegal aliens.Recently there has been prominent bi-partisan opposition to the initiative. Jack Kemp, who is pondering seeking the Republican presidential nomination, and William Bennett, a leading Republican idea man, came out against it. So did President Clinton and Attorney General Janet Reno.
NEWS
By BEN WATTENBERG | September 8, 1995
Washington. -- Asegment on CNN's ''Capitol Gang'' dealt with the recent announcement of presidential candidacy by California's Gov. Pete Wilson, which was delivered in front of the Statue of Liberty.The video clips showed the candidate criticizing a welfare system that offers extra money to recipients who have additional children while on welfare, decrying the fact that law-abiding Americans fear to go outside because of street crime, deploring an affirmative-action process that has evolved into de facto quotas and condemning the porous border control that allows a steady stream of illegal immigrants into America.
NEWS
By CARL T. ROWAN | January 16, 1992
Louisville, Kentucky -- You join the Jefferson County Teachers Association here in honoring the 42 high school youngsters who most exemplify the ideals of Martin Luther King Jr., and a chilling thought strikes you:In all our political jousting over America's sick economy, of its growing economic warfare with Japan, almost no politician is willing to say that we have never educated America's children to compete with the Japanese, the Germans or anyone else.In...
NEWS
February 12, 1995
With Dan Quayle out of the race for the 1996 Republican presidential nomination, the spotlight shines ever more brightly on two Inside-the-Beltway contenders: Sens. Bob Dole of Kansas and Phil Gramm of Texas.But don't let the early line fool you. Before this marathon is over, a bunch of GOP governors will be heard from. Most especially Pete Wilson of California. And if he is the stopper of a Dole or Gramm bandwagon, Tommy Thompson of Wisconsin, John Engler of Michigan and William Weld of Massachusetts could jump in, thus creating the first open convention in a long, long time.
NEWS
January 27, 1994
President Clinton's State of the Union remarks on crime sound familiar? They should. In his New York State of the State address this month, Democratic Gov. Mario Cuomo, who is running for re-election, sounded so conservative on crime (also on welfare and taxes) that the Republican leader in the New York Senate said, "It sounds like a speech that could have been written for me." New York City's new Republican mayor, former crime-buster Rudolph Giuliani, said he could conceivably endorse Governor Cuomo.
NEWS
August 30, 1995
Depending on how you look at it, California Gov. Pete Wilson either turned his back on the Statue of Liberty or embraced what she stands for -- legal immigration. "There is a right way to come to America and a wrong way," he said in New York as he announced his candidacy for president. "Illegal immigration is not the American way."Almost everyone agrees with that. And in fact many voters agree that legal immigration needs to be curbed.The Clinton administration has come out for reducing the number of refugees admitted into the country each year.
NEWS
February 12, 1995
With Dan Quayle out of the race for the 1996 Republican presidential nomination, the spotlight shines ever more brightly on two Inside-the-Beltway contenders: Sens. Bob Dole of Kansas and Phil Gramm of Texas.But don't let the early line fool you. Before this marathon is over, a bunch of GOP governors will be heard from. Most especially Pete Wilson of California. And if he is the stopper of a Dole or Gramm bandwagon, Tommy Thompson of Wisconsin, John Engler of Michigan and William Weld of Massachusetts could jump in, thus creating the first open convention in a long, long time.
NEWS
November 7, 1994
Voting on state initiatives usually has local political implications only, but the vote on what Californians call Prop 187 will have national impact. It bans education, health and employment benefits for illegal aliens.Recently there has been prominent bi-partisan opposition to the initiative. Jack Kemp, who is pondering seeking the Republican presidential nomination, and William Bennett, a leading Republican idea man, came out against it. So did President Clinton and Attorney General Janet Reno.
NEWS
By RICHARD REEVES | September 6, 1994
Los Angeles -- The rap on the Democratic candidate for governor, state treasurer Kathleen Brown, is that she's ''not substantive'' -- ''soft'' is the word they like to use. One of the things that makes her ''soft,'' according to Gov. Pete Wilson, the Republican candidate, is her opposition to new laws that would require schoolteachers and nurses to report to the police anyone they thought looked like he or she might be an illegal alien.Nice, huh? How would you like to be Henry Cisneros or Connie Chung in a state with laws like that?
NEWS
By GEORGE F. WILL | August 4, 1994
San Diego. -- It's a big state, so many numbers are bound to be big, but still: In this year's first half, Californians made 332,000 legal gun purchases, a 6 percent increase over the same period last year, a year when California gun sales soared 19 percent. This is one reason why Gov. Pete Wilson would be smiling promiscuously were he not parsimonious with smiles. He is not happy about the anxieties driving gun sales, but he is one of the nation's most seasoned politicians and he knows when issues are breaking his way.The issues dominating California's gubernatorial campaign, crime and illegal immigration, are considered by many voters to be a single issue, the latter being part of the former.
NEWS
June 11, 1994
On Wednesday, hours after the votes were counted in the California primary, Republican Gov. Pete Wilson began the general election campaign with new television commercials. His opponent, Kathleen Brown (daughter of ex-guv Pat, brother of ex-guv Jerry), was way ahead of him. She won the Democratic nomination by running against his record, rather than her primary opponents.This is the most important gubernatorial race of 1994. It is important for two reasons. The first is the major party candidates and their natural constituencies have starkly contrasting views on the direction the state must take.
NEWS
By GEORGE F. WILL | August 4, 1994
San Diego. -- It's a big state, so many numbers are bound to be big, but still: In this year's first half, Californians made 332,000 legal gun purchases, a 6 percent increase over the same period last year, a year when California gun sales soared 19 percent. This is one reason why Gov. Pete Wilson would be smiling promiscuously were he not parsimonious with smiles. He is not happy about the anxieties driving gun sales, but he is one of the nation's most seasoned politicians and he knows when issues are breaking his way.The issues dominating California's gubernatorial campaign, crime and illegal immigration, are considered by many voters to be a single issue, the latter being part of the former.
NEWS
By GEORGE F. WILL | September 28, 1992
Los Angeles. -- In June 1991, as California was in the throes of its annual budget war, a Democratic state legislator scoffed at the idea that the impending tax increase -- the largest in the history of any state -- would cause businesses to flee California. Oh sure, he said, ''They're going to take all those yachts from Newport Harbor and move them to Tonopah, Nevada.''Try Tucson. That is where the Hughes company is taking 4,500 jobs. When considering relocation of its missile-building operation, Hughes compared Arizona and California regarding about 50 factors -- taxes, regulatory burden, utility rates, labor costs, housing, etc. -- and decided Arizona was superior in all but two categories.
NEWS
February 3, 1994
Half the nation's governors are expected to run for re-election this year. For two Republicans, 1994 could be a trial run for a presidential bid in 1996.One is Gov. Pete Wilson of California. His four years as chief executive have been a disaster in California, literally. There have been earthquakes, devastating forest fires, a terrible riot; and the state's economy, especially in the populous south, is still not rising out of the recession apace with most of the rest of the nation.Governor Wilson said this week in Washington, where the National Governors' Association was meeting, that he should not be included on the presidential sweepstakes lists, because if re-elected he wants to focus on getting his state back on the road to better times.
NEWS
January 27, 1994
President Clinton's State of the Union remarks on crime sound familiar? They should. In his New York State of the State address this month, Democratic Gov. Mario Cuomo, who is running for re-election, sounded so conservative on crime (also on welfare and taxes) that the Republican leader in the New York Senate said, "It sounds like a speech that could have been written for me." New York City's new Republican mayor, former crime-buster Rudolph Giuliani, said he could conceivably endorse Governor Cuomo.
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