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NEWS
February 22, 1993
In the aftermath of John S. Arnick's decision last week to withdraw his name from consideration as a District Court judge, legislators and citizens ought to ponder Mr. Arnick's observation that "fundamental fairness demands a better process." While Mr. Arnick must bear the major share of the responsibility for his inability to win Senate approval, he was ill-served by both the executive and legislative systems set up to select and approve judicial appointments.Mr. Arnick's talents as a legislator were never in question.
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NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | December 18, 2004
In a closed-door meeting yesterday, Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. and top executives of The Sun discussed the paper's coverage of the governor and the administration's order that bans state workers from speaking with two journalists at the newspaper. The 90-minute meeting, however, resulted in little apparent progress toward lifting the ban other than an agreement to continue talking. Ehrlich provided the paper's editors with a list of articles that he believes contain inaccuracies, and Sun editors agreed to review the stories and meet with the governor's staff to go over them soon.
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BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Staff Writer | March 10, 1993
State is facing new time crunchNo one thought it would come to this, but the state may have to race the clock in its bid to buy 6 St. Paul Centre, one of the city's biggest office buildings.Martin W. Walsh, Jr., secretary of the Department of General Services, last Friday wrote to Senate Budget and Taxation Committee Chairman Laurence Levitan asking that Mr. Levitan and Del. Howard P. "Pete" Rawlings, chairman of the House Appropriations Committee, sign off on the proposed $12.2 million sale by today.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | November 27, 2004
Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. said yesterday that his directive preventing state officials from speaking with two journalists at The Sun was "meant to have a chilling effect" on "two writers who have no credibility." Speaking on a WBAL radio program yesterday morning, the governor said the ban was intended to draw a line in the sand and set a benchmark for the minimum level of accuracy he expects in newspaper coverage of his administration. "At what point does a monopoly newspaper abuse its privilege, its First Amendment privilege, in making things up, making quotes up, making context up?"
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,SUN STAFF | December 18, 1996
Gov. Parris N. Glendening said yesterday that there wouldn't be a "great deal" of state aid to private schools, despite an aggressive lobbying effort by Catholic school parents that brought 6,500 letters to his desk this fall.But contrary to televised reports that Glendening was dismissing the pleas, the governor's spokeswoman, Torrie Leonard, said his position "is not an out-and-out 'no.' He said it's not likely because of a very tight budget."The governor's staff is still working on the draft of a reply to the families who wrote asking for money for transportation, textbooks and technology in next year's budget.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | December 3, 2001
Gov. Parris N. Glendening makes his not-so-secret candidacy for chancellor of the University System of Maryland a little less secret this week with comments appearing today in a national higher-education newspaper. Saying that his experiences have made him "fanatically committed to higher education," Glendening told The Chronicle of Higher Education that he would be qualified to oversee the 13-campus system and "honored" to be considered for the $345,000-a-year post. "My whole life has been higher education," Glendening said in an article in this week's issue of the weekly newspaper that covers colleges and universities.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | December 18, 2004
In a closed-door meeting yesterday, Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. and top executives of The Sun discussed the paper's coverage of the governor and the administration's order that bans state workers from speaking with two journalists at the newspaper. The 90-minute meeting, however, resulted in little apparent progress toward lifting the ban other than an agreement to continue talking. Ehrlich provided the paper's editors with a list of articles that he believes contain inaccuracies, and Sun editors agreed to review the stories and meet with the governor's staff to go over them soon.
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Evening Sun Staff | September 24, 1990
It took Gov. William Donald Schaefer nearly an entire term in office to choose a stand on the abortion question.But abortion-rights advocates are moving quickly to assess how the governor's position can be used to boost their goal of passing pro-choice legislation during the 1991 General Assembly.Schaefer, who had publicly complained that no one but reporters cared about his stand on abortion, electrified abortion-rights groups when he made public his decision that he opposes restrictions on a woman's right to a legal abortion.
NEWS
By Frank A. DeFilippo | May 14, 1992
WHERE'S Mickey?Well, for openers, you can bet that Mickey -- a.k.a. Lt. Gov. Melvin Steinberg -- is not attending a meeting in Gov. William Donald Schaefer's office. He hasn't done that in more than a year.Nor does he any longer join in cabinet meetings or governor's press conferences. Neither was Mickey invited to a retreat of the governor's cabinet and staff last week at the posh Harbortowne on the waterfront in St. Michael's. And he wasn't included in the traveling roadshow that met with the bond rating houses in New York.
NEWS
By BARRY RASCOVAR | March 7, 1999
YOU might call it the curious case of the disappearing governor. Just past the mid-point in this year's General Assembly session, Gov. Parris Glendening has yet to become fully involved in legislative activities.It's almost as though he's focused on something else -- like positioning himself for a possible high-level Washington appointment after the 2000 presidential election.Low-key approachThe administration has taken a low-key approach toward this 90-day meeting of state lawmakers. Occasionally, the governor speaks out -- often by letter or formal announcement -- on a subject.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | September 12, 2004
The chairman of the Maryland Board of Elections denied yesterday that he leaked the confidential charges against Elections Administrator Linda H. Lamone to the news media and defended himself against her accusation that his attempt to remove her is politically motivated. Gilles W. Burger, a Republican who was appointed to the board in 2000 and became chairman last year, said Lamone was wrong when she testified in Anne Arundel County Circuit Court that he only became dissatisfied with her performance after meeting with Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s staff last year.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | August 3, 2004
THE DAY AFTER Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. and the state Board of Public Works laid off 43 employees this summer, a well-paid worker began in a newly created position. June Smith took the helm of the communications office of the state Department of Juvenile Services, where she will earn $79,771 a year, according to state records. Her hiring surprised some department employees, who were unaware that a new job was being created at a time when the governor was ordering agencies to scour their budgets, target programs for elimination and reduce spending by up to 12 percent.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | March 25, 2004
Countless heroes. Two squabbling politicians. And one half-empty reception room. Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. is throwing a reception today for Baltimore firefighters and naval reservists who came to the rescue after a Seaport Taxi capsized March 6. But only a handful of firefighters received invitations because City Hall wouldn't provide names to the governor, saying it is too soon for such a ceremony. Now Ehrlich and Mayor Martin O'Malley are accusing each other of playing politics with a tragic accident that claimed five lives and put Fire Department divers through 10 days of peril.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | December 3, 2001
Gov. Parris N. Glendening makes his not-so-secret candidacy for chancellor of the University System of Maryland a little less secret this week with comments appearing today in a national higher-education newspaper. Saying that his experiences have made him "fanatically committed to higher education," Glendening told The Chronicle of Higher Education that he would be qualified to oversee the 13-campus system and "honored" to be considered for the $345,000-a-year post. "My whole life has been higher education," Glendening said in an article in this week's issue of the weekly newspaper that covers colleges and universities.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 6, 2000
Four months ago in Texas, Gov. George W. Bush signed a proclamation declaring June 10 to be Jesus Day, and urging all Texans to "follow Christ's example by performing good works in their communities and neighborhoods." The proclamation received little attention at the time, except for gratitude from a Christian organization that had asked governors to issue proclamations supporting its annual day of charity, prayer and parades in Jesus' name. Now what seemed purely ceremonial has turned into a controversy for Bush.
NEWS
By BARRY RASCOVAR | March 7, 1999
YOU might call it the curious case of the disappearing governor. Just past the mid-point in this year's General Assembly session, Gov. Parris Glendening has yet to become fully involved in legislative activities.It's almost as though he's focused on something else -- like positioning himself for a possible high-level Washington appointment after the 2000 presidential election.Low-key approachThe administration has taken a low-key approach toward this 90-day meeting of state lawmakers. Occasionally, the governor speaks out -- often by letter or formal announcement -- on a subject.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | December 15, 1998
State Treasurer Richard N. Dixon said yesterday that he is likely to oppose a series of pay raises for Gov. Parris N. Glendening's senior staff members when the increases come before the Board of Public Works tomorrow.Dixon, one of three members of the board, said the raises exceed General Assembly guidelines limiting such increases to 6 percent."More than 6 percent, I'm going to vote against -- that's the standard set by the legislature," said Dixon, who represents the General Assembly on the board.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith | September 30, 1991
A leadership style described as overbearing and policy differences with members of his party's executive committee are pushing State Democratic Party Chairman Nathan Landow to the brink of a no-confidence vote, according to a number of party regulars.Although he has made no official comment on the party leadership, Gov. William Donald Schaefer, through aides, has sympathized with the group of insurgents and reportedly is seeking a replacement for Mr. Landow.The party's vice chair, Baltimore City Councilwoman Vera P. Hall, said last week that she feels Mr. Landow must moderate his "solo" style or leave.
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN STAFF | January 21, 1999
Gov. Parris N. Glendening's inaugural parties may not have cost taxpayers one dime, but Maryland businesses and lobbyists paid a pretty penny for them. The governor's inaugural committee raised about $1 million to pay for the ball last night at the Baltimore Convention Center and a pre-inaugural cocktail party Sunday in College Park, according to an incomplete list of contributors. More than $850,000 of that will cover expenses for the parties, with any money left over going to Maryland charities, officials said.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | December 15, 1998
State Treasurer Richard N. Dixon said yesterday that he is likely to oppose a series of pay raises for Gov. Parris N. Glendening's senior staff members when the increases come before the Board of Public Works tomorrow.Dixon, one of three members of the board, said the raises exceed General Assembly guidelines limiting such increases to 6 percent."More than 6 percent, I'm going to vote against -- that's the standard set by the legislature," said Dixon, who represents the General Assembly on the board.
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