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By Doug Birch and Sandy Banisky and Doug Birch and Sandy Banisky,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | April 27, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- Gov. William Donald Schaefer blamed budget cuts yesterday -- not his simmering feud with Lt. Gov. Melvin A. Steinberg -- for his decision to slash Mr. Steinberg's five-member staff by two.But Mr. Steinberg said he thinks "I may be a scapegoat" for the governor's recent legislative reversals.Describing himself repeatedly as befuddled and disappointed by the governor's action, Mr. Steinberg added: "He's had a glorious career, and to end it like this is sad.""I recognize he has a lot of problems and I understand I may be a scapegoat," he said, citing the failure of several of the governor's legislative initiatives during the recent General Assembly session.
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NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | November 16, 2012
Gov. Martin O'Malley on Friday appointed the director of the "No Kid Hungry" state campaign to lead the Governor's Office for Children. Anne Sheridan will take on the governor's goal to make Maryland the first state to end childhood hunger among its residents by 2015. The Office for Children also promotes youth health and wellness. "In our state, we believe in our children growing healthy, growing educated, and growing strong," O'Malley said in a statement. "We know that Anne's wealth of knowledge and expertise will help us protect the priorities of Maryland's children and improve their quality of life so, together, we can give them the tools they need to build a better, stronger future.
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NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | April 21, 2001
Calvert County Sheriff Vonzell Ward, the first African-American to serve as his county's chief law enforcement officer, has resigned amid controversy over his conduct, Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller said yesterday. Ward, who served for six years and was widely admired for his bravery in overcoming the crippling effects of an automobile accident 20 years ago, announced his resignation in a letter to Gov. Parris N. Glendening. His resignation is to take effect May 4, sources said.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | May 4, 2012
Kristen M. Mahoney, one of the longest-serving aides to Gov. Martin O'Malley, is leaving her job as head of the Governor's Office of Crime Control and Prevention to take a position with the U.S. Department of Justice. Mahoney, 44, said Friday that the move has nothing to do with a series of recent departures announced by other officials in high-profile crime-fighting roles in Maryland. "It was a very difficult decision, but it was an opportunity to work on national criminal justice policy," she said.
NEWS
July 19, 1996
NO ONE SHOULD BE surprised at the recent dismissal of state roads chief Hal Kassoff. The amazing thing is that he lasted as long as he did, given the animus Gov. Parris N. Glendening expressed toward Mr. Kassoff even before his first day as Maryland's chief executive.The governor apparently held a grudge against Mr. Kassoff for disputes he had with the state highway administrator during Mr. Glendening's long tenure as Prince George's county executive. He never forgave, or forgot. But Mr. Glendening was told so often by politicians and transportation experts that Mr. Kassoff excelled at his job that the governor kept him on. Until now.There's no doubt that Mr. Kassoff is headstrong and tenacious, at one point ignoring a request that he quietly submit his resignation.
NEWS
By Frank A. DeFilippo | April 4, 1991
A REPORTER once asked former Gov. Marvin Mandel the secret of his mastery over the General Assembly and his wizardry at winning passage of difficult legislation."
NEWS
By William Thompson Analysis and William Thompson Analysis,Evening Sun Staff | April 8, 1991
Session's winners and losers talliedTwo moods -- both of them dark -- clouded the 1991 session of the Maryland General Assembly. When lawmakers weren't squirming beneath the weight of an economic recession, they were shielding themselves from the fallout of a gubernatorial depression.Between the bad budget news and the bad vibes, the session, which ends at midnight today, was a 90-day test of wits, endurance and humor. So who comes out a winner and who crawls out a loser? Very few players will awaken tomorrow untarnished by the legislative grind.
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky | October 2, 1991
Five years ago, back when Maryland's economic forecasters saw only sunshine, Gov. Harry R. Hughes made do with a staff of 74. Today, amid a budget hurricane that's about to toss more than 1,700 state employees out of work, Gov. William Donald Schaefer presides over an executive staff that's swollen to 119.And none is being laid off.How did the governor's office escape the storm? Frank Traynor, the governor's press secretary, would not answer directly."All I know is that these cuts affected agencies across the board," Mr. Traynor said.
NEWS
October 11, 1991
What Gov. William Donald Schaefer has done in his latest budget proposal is to shift the burden of Maryland's $450 million financial crisis to local subdivisions. This was implicit in legislative alternatives to the governor's original plan to slice deeply into social service programs, cut police jobs, ground some medevac helicopters and idle more than 1,700 state workers. Nothing really is solved.What it proves is that there can be no response to the state's budget shortfall that is not without pain.
NEWS
By Frank A. DeFilippo | February 13, 1992
WHOEVER goaded Gov. William Donald Schaefer into allowing his name to be wafted as a once-and-future candidate for mayor of Baltimore gave him bum advice.Now the governor's caught between the devil and the deep: He's sinking like a rock in the polls, and any help he proffers Baltimore appears as if he's lining his own future at the expense of the state.But then, Mr. Schaefer has a habit of jerking our chains, especially during the silly-season sessions of the General Assembly. Remember last year when he announced his candidacy for president?
NEWS
July 12, 2010
I read the article by Annie Linskey in The Baltimore Sun: "Lesser-known candidates also want to be governor" (July 10). Elections cycles usually seem just like a redundant washing of political laundry, with one of two choices, the Republican or the Democrat being "pressed" into service for the next four years. I hear the two major candidates profess their love for the state and that they will work hard. Suppose for a moment that a lesser-known dark-horse candidate would run and say if he's elected Governor, he will give a small cubicle to Bob Ehrlich Jr. and Martin O'Malley in an anteroom to the Governor's Office.
NEWS
By Tiffany March and Tiffany March,Capital News Service | January 15, 2010
WASHINGTON - -Gov. Martin O'Malley has tapped a new state advisory board to help Maryland residents find jobs with the nation's largest employer - the federal government. The 16-member Federal Facilities Advisory Board, which O'Malley announced this week, will work with the Maryland Department of Business and Economic Development to examine how federal facilities in the state can boost Maryland employment numbers. Chairman Kevin F. Kelly of McLean, Va., said the board's goal "is to go out and listen to people and find out from them what they need."
NEWS
August 10, 2009
Someone from Allegany County wrote in with a detailed suggestion for reducing the number of trips corrections employees take to transfer files from one prison to another. "It may not save much, but every little bit helps," the person wrote. Someone in Harford County advocated going to a four-day workweek for all state employees. Someone in Baltimore pitched an early retirement plan for state workers. And, not to traffic in regional stereotypes, but someone from Montgomery County insisted on higher income tax rates before the state cuts a penny from the social safety net. Those are a handful of the nearly 600 pages of responses Gov. Martin O'Malley had received in his suggestion box for ways to save the state government money as of late last week.
NEWS
By Michael Muskal and Mark Z. Barabak and Michael Muskal and Mark Z. Barabak,Tribune Newspapers | July 4, 2009
Sarah Palin chose a slow news day before a holiday to shake up the political world, saying she will step down as governor of Alaska but leaving open the question of her political future. "We've got to put first things first. I love my job, and I love Alaska. I am doing what's best for Alaska," Palin said Friday at a televised news conference in her hometown of Wasilla. Palin said she hoped people would not be disappointed by the decision, which she said she had contemplated for some time.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | December 16, 2008
CHICAGO - President-elect Barack Obama said yesterday that an investigation by his office has found that his staff had no inappropriate conversations with Illinois Gov. Rod R. Blagojevich over who would succeed Obama in the Senate. But Obama said the review of his staff's contacts would not be made public until next week at the request of federal prosecutors, who are investigating Blagojevich for allegedly putting Obama's vacated Senate seat up for sale. "I had no contact with the governor's office, and I had no contact with anybody in the governor's office," Obama said at a news conference called to introduce his energy and environment team.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | December 12, 2008
The governor's office is offering $30,000 in state grants to individuals and organizations looking to stage film festivals in Maryland. "Interest in film festivals is a great way to boost tourism, as well as showcase Maryland's very talented filmmakers," Gov. Martin O'Malley said in a statement. "We hope that these funds will help leverage private sector support for the film industry, and encourage new festivals throughout the state." The grants available range from $1,000 to $5,000. Proposals will be evaluated based on such criteria as the quality, quantity and diversity of the programming, the anticipated attendance, and community involvement and support.
NEWS
March 17, 1992
It took a mediator and a series of exhaustive meetings, but the governor's office and the Maryland Disability Law Center have finally ended their bitter dispute. This clears the way for MDLC to receive $260,000 in federal funds that were being held up by the governor.We're happy the two sides are no longer feuding in court but sitting down and working out their differences instead. The big winners are the mentally and emotionally disabled Marylanders in state-run institutions who are represented by MDLC.
NEWS
By BARRY RASCOVAR and BARRY RASCOVAR,Barry Rascovar is editorial-page director of The Sun | May 24, 1992
Only 27 months till the gubernatorial primary, and the state is already littered with budding candidates. Yet in the wacky world of Maryland politics, there is no front-runner.Under ordinary circumstances, Lt. Gov. Melvin Steinberg would be the odds-on choice to succeed his boss, Gov. William Donald Schaefer. But Mr. Schaefer has disowned his running mate, cutting him totally out of his political will. The lieutenant governor has been removed from all important decision-making and has been exiled to Mr. Schaefer's version of political Siberia.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith | June 8, 2008
Gov. Martin O'Malley sat in the audience last week as the portrait of his once and perhaps future adversary, Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., was unveiled. Some have said these two young lions of Maryland politics are antagonistic twins destined for more rounds of political combat. However, their wives, Kendel Ehrlich and Katie Curran O'Malley - as if signaling some kind of sartorial truce - came to the event in essentially the same dress. The emcee, Edward T. Norris, is a convicted felon and talk-show host who, before his conviction, had been head of the Baltimore police for Mr. O'Malley and then superintendent of the state police for Mr. Ehrlich.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | April 30, 2008
If Anthony Brown ever gets his fill of politics, he might consider a second career as a tuxedo model. The lieutenant governor has already appeared, decked out in a snazzy penguin suit, in a magazine ad for Kustom Looks Clothier. Makes sense, since the Landover haberdashery bills itself as "The Official Clothier for Prominent Professionals." Except for that bit in Maryland law that prohibits state officials from using the "prestige" of their office for private gain. Brown spokeswoman Nancy Lineman said the lieutenant governor's office only recently became aware of the ad, which has run several times in Prince George's Suite magazine.
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