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NEWS
By Samuel Goldreich and Samuel Goldreich,Staff writer | February 28, 1991
Robert R. Neall broke local campaign spending records to get electedcounty executive last year. But he's still raising money, beginning tonight with a $200-a-head fund-raiser.State election board records show that the well-heeled Republican raised more than $475,000 through Nov. 26 and spent more than $460,000.The campaign ended in the black after the last bills were paid and the last contributions trickled in, said Donald Riddle, chairman ofNeall's continuing committee.But the committee is now more than $4,000 in debt because Neall threw a post-election party for about 400 of his closest friends, Riddle said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 3, 2010
The Aug. 2 edition of The Baltimore Sun has another article ("Ehrlich, O'Malley budgeted similarly") where the facts present both candidates in a similar light as to raising taxes and creating deficits. If both have been lacking in financial abilities to get our state out of this tax-and-spend attitude, why don't their respective political parties recruit someone with better fiscal abilities? The answer is simple. Both Republicans and Democrats are more concerned with getting their respective party in the governor's mansion.
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NEWS
July 17, 1991
Gov. William Donald Schaefer canceled yesterday a visit he had planned to the annual J. Millard Tawes Crab and Clam Bake in Crisfield today, and State House sources attributed the change of plans to the governor's concern over the health of his longtime companion, Hilda Mae Snoops.The governor, however, scoffed at the suggestion, saying, "Boy, I hadn't heard that." But he acknowledged that Mrs. Snoops, who has been seen in public rarely in recent months, remains ill in the Governor's Mansion.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2010
Lady , the golden retriever who graced Maryland state highway maps and gubernatorial Christmas cards, died last month. She was 13 and lived in the governor's mansion. One of many pets in the O'Malley menagerie, Lady came to the family 10 years ago when Gov. Martin O'Malley was mayor of Baltimore. A friend of a friend had some health problems and had to give her up. The O'Malleys, who then had three young children (the fourth came later), were looking for a dog that was housebroken.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | February 3, 1992
George is a right-winger up to the National Convention, and will be a centrist for November. Let squeal who may.Everything shuts down, under the Doomsday budget, except the fountain at the Governor's Mansion.Don't knock Yeltsin. He's a world statesman now. Just like Gorby before the fall.George has discovered a lot of virtues at the U.N. Which is not to say he is going to pay up the back dues all at once.The key issue of whether Don should become mayor again is how he would get on with Governor Schmoke.
NEWS
October 1, 1992
EXCEPT for the statement that we had dinner at th Governor's Mansion with Governor Schaefer, Frank A. DeFilippo's column Sept. 3 about what happened at the dinner was completely inaccurate. Our group of Italian-American businessmen has been meeting with Governor Schaefer for several years, with meetings being held in Baltimore and Annapolis.At our last dinner meeting at the mansion, the governor $l absolutely did not ask the group to organize a tribute to him from the Baltimore Italian-American community in preparation for a mayoral campaign, as Mr. DeFilippo stated.
NEWS
By ELISE ARMACOST | April 25, 1993
Here's a hot political scoop, straight from Anne Arundel County Executive Bobby Neall:He says he might run for governor.He also says he might run for comptroller.Or a second term as county executive.Or, he says, he might not run for anything and go for the big bucks in the private sector instead.There you have it.Forget the rumors. Forget the politicians who claim to be in the know and the political pundits who get their information from them.As of April 25, 1993, Bobby Neall says he's not in the governor's race or anything else, and he's not out. All possibilities are open.
NEWS
By BARRY RASCOVAR and BARRY RASCOVAR,Barry Rascovar is editorial-page director of The Sun | September 26, 1993
Give Kurt Schmoke credit. When it came time to make a tough, personal political decision, he used common sense and pragmatism.Running for governor would have been a disaster. In the end, he realized that. He made a smart strategic move last week in removing himself from the 1994 gubernatorial field and immediately plunging into his 1995 re-election campaign for mayor of Baltimore.It was a smart move on any number of levels.From a personal standpoint, Mr. Schmoke wouldn't have enjoyed a run for the governor's mansion.
NEWS
December 3, 1994
AT $35 a piece, the 7,200 copies of the 1994-1995 MarylandManual are, pound for pound and dollar for dollar, the biggest waste of money by the state.Less than a month after publication, this 971-page volume of state government offices and officials was hopelessly out of date. Even worse, the editors of this vital handbook knew this would happen -- and yet they went ahead and published this tome that lavishes generous praise on the Schaefer administration.The problem is that the state was so late in putting out the updated version that when it was finally available, it was almost time for the November elections.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,Sun reporter | November 11, 2006
Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. all but ruled out another run for public office but said in two radio interviews yesterday that he is keeping his career options open in the wake of his failed re-election bid. The Republican made his first extensive comments since Tuesday's election on two radio talk shows he has frequented as governor: the Chip Franklin Show on WBAL-AM and the Sports Junkies on WHFS-FM. The governor struck an upbeat tone on both shows, even though he said the election demonstrated that the state has moved away from him politically.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Annie Linskey | April 10, 2010
A celebration for freshmen members of the Maryland state legislature ended abruptly when smoke entered the Annapolis barroom in which it was held. Gov. Martin O'Malley and House Speaker Michael E. Busch were among at least 50 lawmakers who left the smoky building about 11:15 p.m. Thursday, just before Annapolis fire units arrived. Lt. John J. Bowes of the Annapolis Fire Marshal's Office said Friday that there was "no fire" at the bar, but said smoke and debris came out of vents when the heating system - which had been off for some time - was inadvertently turned on. The smoky conditions occurred toward the end of a celebration for lawmakers finishing their first terms in office.
NEWS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,brent.jones@baltsun.com | January 21, 2010
The wife of former Gov. Harry Hughes died in Denton early Wednesday morning after suffering for years from Parkinson's disease, according to the governor's campaign manager. Patricia Hughes was 79. Joseph Coale, who worked on Mr. Hughes' staff in the 1980s and served as his campaign manager in 1978 and 1982, called Mrs. Hughes a strong-willed woman who counseled the governor on a variety of topics. "She was always willing to provide" advice, Mr. Coale said. "Her standards were high, and she strove for perfection."
NEWS
By Annie Linskey | annie.linskey@baltsun.com | January 14, 2010
Several hundred anti-tax "Tea Party" protesters converged on a courtyard outside the governor's mansion Wednesday night after the Maryland General Assembly opened its legislative session, shouting, "Vote them out." The star protester: Former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., a Republican who is considering a rematch against the Democratic governor who defeated him four years ago. Ehrlich, who attended the rally with his wife, Kendel, and several former aides, did not speak but milled around the gathering of activists.
NEWS
January 11, 2009
CORNELIA WALLACE, 69 Widow of George C. Wallace Former Alabama first lady Cornelia Wallace, who threw herself over Gov. George C. Wallace when he was shot in a 1972 assassination attempt, died of cancer Thursday in Sebring, Fla. Mrs. Wallace, the niece of two-term Gov. James E. "Big Jim" Folsom, married Mr. Wallace on Jan. 4, 1971. It was the second marriage for both. The union marked a merger between Alabama's two most famous political families and surprised some because Mr. Wallace had defeated Mr. Folsom in the 1962 race for governor, and the relationship between the two men was strained.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith | June 8, 2008
Gov. Martin O'Malley sat in the audience last week as the portrait of his once and perhaps future adversary, Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., was unveiled. Some have said these two young lions of Maryland politics are antagonistic twins destined for more rounds of political combat. However, their wives, Kendel Ehrlich and Katie Curran O'Malley - as if signaling some kind of sartorial truce - came to the event in essentially the same dress. The emcee, Edward T. Norris, is a convicted felon and talk-show host who, before his conviction, had been head of the Baltimore police for Mr. O'Malley and then superintendent of the state police for Mr. Ehrlich.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,Sun Reporter | August 30, 2007
When Jon and Rosemarie Butts tried to figure out when to take their 13-month-old son, Ryan, to the Maryland State Fair in Timonium, the answer was obvious: Bob Ehrlich night. They liked him as governor, wish he was still, and will vote for him again in a heartbeat - no matter what he runs for. At the moment, that's nothing, but if any of the people who wandered by the Maryland Republican Party's booth last night thought the ex-governor's appearance was a campaign stop, the confusion would be understandable.
NEWS
By Michael Tackett and Michael Tackett,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 22, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Bill Richardson, the avuncular governor of New Mexico, an internationalist with a gold-plated resume, announced yesterday his intention to seek the Democratic presidential nomination, making history as the first Latino to have a credible chance to lead a national ticket. On paper, Richardson's credentials are unassailable. He has served as a member of Congress, ambassador to the United Nations, energy secretary and, since, 2002, the governor of a state in the heart of the rapidly growing Sun Belt.
NEWS
By Candy Thomson Roch Eric Kubatko | March 6, 1991
Talk about taking your toys and going home. Hilda Mae Snoops has performed the adult equivalent.The governor's first buddy is miffed that people are making fun of all the neat furniture and stuff she put in the Governor's Mansion.The Snoopster's taken a nutty and wants to back a U-Haul up to State Circle to teach everyone a lesson.Serves us right. Here's a woman of obvious taste (check out her best buddy) who's trying to keepthe Governor's Mansion from looking like Jed Clampett and Granny have moved in with Jethro and Elly Mae.And what have we done?
FEATURES
By Jennifer Skalka and Jennifer Skalka,sun reporter | February 5, 2007
Four-year-old Jack O'Malley was walking straight toward the barrier of ferns that decorated the edge of the raised podium where his father would deliver his inaugural address. But before he reached the stage's perilous perimeter, Jack's mother gently reeled him in. She tucked the boy under her coat - with only his head poking out, he resembled a baby marsupial - and then stifled a giggle. No one was the wiser. The state of the youngest member of Maryland's first family was secure. Catherine Curran O'Malley has grown accustomed to just such moments.
NEWS
By Michael Tackett and Michael Tackett,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 22, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Bill Richardson, the avuncular governor of New Mexico, an internationalist with a gold-plated resume, announced yesterday his intention to seek the Democratic presidential nomination, making history as the first Latino to have a credible chance to lead a national ticket. On paper, Richardson's credentials are unassailable. He has served as a member of Congress, ambassador to the United Nations, energy secretary and, since, 2002, the governor of a state in the heart of the rapidly growing Sun Belt.
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