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NEWS
March 24, 1995
It's politically embarrassing for the governor of Maryland to take his family for a Sunday outing aboard the state's own yacht. Even though that's one of the intended purposes of the craft. Even though the Maryland Independence would otherwise sit idly in Annapolis harbor with a full crew.In these times of intense skepticism of public officials, the mere thought of a governor cruising in a state-owned yacht raises hackles. It is a symbol of wealth and privilege that a popularly elected official should avoid.
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NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | February 10, 2005
ANYONE WHO breathes our substandard air, anyone who enjoys intimate speaking terms with a hairstylist, manicurist, snowball purveyor, tattoo artist or podiatrist - basically, any adult with a pulse and an ear for gossip--- heard (and probably repeated) the stories about Martin O'Malley that arrived here like a sulfuric cloud months ago. From the start, it smelled like Baltimore's biggest urban legend, the one about Martin O'Malley's personal life, yet it would not go away. And the mayor's enemies probably liked it that way. Putting an end to such damaging rumors - in this age of mean-stream radio and the chatty free-for-all that is the Internet - is a daunting challenge for anyone who chooses a public life.
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NEWS
October 31, 1991
On the day before Halloween, these four headlines from The Evening Sun told the story:More red ink is on the wayPoor seen getting poorerHard times for farmersSchaefer cheered by Shore welcomeWait a minute. That last one didn't quite fit, did it? Schaefer cheered? On the Shore?Yes, that's right. William Donald Schaefer, the embattled governor of Maryland, went to the region with which he has been feuding -- and got a warm reception.Amid the gloom of the day, it's reassuring to read upbeat stories like our reporter William Thompson's account of the governor's visit to Salisbury, to Easton, to Caroline County for ceremonial occasions.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | November 16, 2004
Michael OleskerBRAVELY DEFYING all risk of severe autumnal chafing, I emerged from the house last weekend to do my own yardwork and, as a Maryland taxpayer and voter, I resent it deeply. Where was the governor of Maryland, Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.? Apparently, he had more important things to do. Raking some other citizen's yard, maybe, or cleaning some voter's bathroom. It says so in the TV commercials. It's all Robert Ehrlich all the time now, brought to you by. ... Well, by you, actually.
NEWS
September 29, 1993
For an experienced poker player, Rep. Benjamin L. Cardin has a peculiar abhorence to taking chances. In fact, the entire political career of this Baltimore metropolitan area congressman has been built upon the premise of avoiding risks. He likes to hold all the high cards before increasing his bet.So far, that strategy has worked well for Mr. Cardin, who has risen from appointment as a state delegate while still in law school to House Ways and Means Committee chairman in Annapolis to House of Delegates speaker and now to a member of Congress with a key health-care subcommittee assignment.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | July 26, 1994
The friends of William Donald Schaefer are giving him an edifice complex. Also, a complex of edifices. In an effort to assure Schaefer that his good works are appreciated and will be remembered as long as there are potholes in alleys, they're naming structures hither and yon for the governor of Maryland.It's like the old beer commercial: Schaefer -- the one name to put on a building, when you're naming more than one.As documented by Sun reporter Ed Gunts, a sort of orgy of Schaefer memorializing has broken out across the state, with plazas here, circles there, and buildings everywhere, either because:a)
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | November 16, 2004
Michael OleskerBRAVELY DEFYING all risk of severe autumnal chafing, I emerged from the house last weekend to do my own yardwork and, as a Maryland taxpayer and voter, I resent it deeply. Where was the governor of Maryland, Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.? Apparently, he had more important things to do. Raking some other citizen's yard, maybe, or cleaning some voter's bathroom. It says so in the TV commercials. It's all Robert Ehrlich all the time now, brought to you by. ... Well, by you, actually.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | February 10, 2005
ANYONE WHO breathes our substandard air, anyone who enjoys intimate speaking terms with a hairstylist, manicurist, snowball purveyor, tattoo artist or podiatrist - basically, any adult with a pulse and an ear for gossip--- heard (and probably repeated) the stories about Martin O'Malley that arrived here like a sulfuric cloud months ago. From the start, it smelled like Baltimore's biggest urban legend, the one about Martin O'Malley's personal life, yet it would not go away. And the mayor's enemies probably liked it that way. Putting an end to such damaging rumors - in this age of mean-stream radio and the chatty free-for-all that is the Internet - is a daunting challenge for anyone who chooses a public life.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith and C. Fraser Smith,SUN STAFF | September 3, 1996
CAMPAIGN contributions are said to buy "access," but recent experience in Maryland may leave some business people wondering about its value.First, racetrack owner Joseph A. De Francis was charged with making illegal contributions to Parris N. Glendening's gubernatorial campaign in 1994. De Francis pleaded nolo contendere to those charges, but his interests may be sentenced to hard time: Legislators will look more carefully at bills he backs lest they be accused of voting for the man with deep pockets.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | January 20, 1998
On this day, the governor of Maryland prepares his State of the State address and hopes that no one has any memory. He and Larry Young were once pretty good pals. He and Young had a mutual friend in Merit Behavioral Care Corp., which attempted to buy them both. Now Larry Young is gone from Annapolis, and Merit is part of the reason, and its shadow still hovers over Parris Glendening.Whatever this governor's virtues, there is the continuing sense of a man outrunning his own sneakiness: the secret pension deal, the money that arrived under the table from racetrack interests, the heavy-handed fund raising.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | January 27, 2002
I AM DRIVING downtown the other morning, listening to some woman holler on my radio, when I see the writing on the wall at Greenmount Avenue and East 20th Street. The woman on the radio is hollering at Rep. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., the 2nd District Republican who might run for governor of Maryland. The writing on the wall is a scream at the whole world, each letter painted in big, black, furious letters. The woman's voice on the radio is written in blood. She says she will never in this lifetime vote for Ehrlich.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | December 5, 2001
PEOPLE OFTEN ASK me: When are you going to write an opera about Parris Glendening? To which I respond: Like, never. Let's face it, he's not exactly Scarpia. There's an element of Don Giovanni there but an equal amount of Don Knotts. The governor of Maryland just doesn't give much in the way of operatic inspiration: He split up with his wife. He reportedly hooked up with a younger woman on his staff. But ol' Parris couldn't even do that with drama; a potential five-course feast of scandal never got beyond a dull, little dinner for two at Cracker Barrel.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith and William F. Zorzi Jr. and C. Fraser Smith and William F. Zorzi Jr.,SUN STAFF | October 17, 1998
With the race for governor of Maryland exceedingly close, Dick Hug has expanded his fund raising for Republican challenger Ellen R. Sauerbrey -- by calling givers who have tended to back Democrats."
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | July 21, 1998
THE PHONE'S gone dead and the mail carrier's wilted in the heat. All lines of communication have been shut down. Nothing else explains the silence from David R. Blumberg, who said he would contact me the moment Ellen Sauerbrey admitted she went off the arithmetical deep end about the election for governor of Maryland four years ago.Blumberg, chairman of Baltimore's Republican Party and longtime GOP voice across the state, called here last December with...
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | January 20, 1998
On this day, the governor of Maryland prepares his State of the State address and hopes that no one has any memory. He and Larry Young were once pretty good pals. He and Young had a mutual friend in Merit Behavioral Care Corp., which attempted to buy them both. Now Larry Young is gone from Annapolis, and Merit is part of the reason, and its shadow still hovers over Parris Glendening.Whatever this governor's virtues, there is the continuing sense of a man outrunning his own sneakiness: the secret pension deal, the money that arrived under the table from racetrack interests, the heavy-handed fund raising.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith and C. Fraser Smith,SUN STAFF | September 3, 1996
CAMPAIGN contributions are said to buy "access," but recent experience in Maryland may leave some business people wondering about its value.First, racetrack owner Joseph A. De Francis was charged with making illegal contributions to Parris N. Glendening's gubernatorial campaign in 1994. De Francis pleaded nolo contendere to those charges, but his interests may be sentenced to hard time: Legislators will look more carefully at bills he backs lest they be accused of voting for the man with deep pockets.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | July 21, 1998
THE PHONE'S gone dead and the mail carrier's wilted in the heat. All lines of communication have been shut down. Nothing else explains the silence from David R. Blumberg, who said he would contact me the moment Ellen Sauerbrey admitted she went off the arithmetical deep end about the election for governor of Maryland four years ago.Blumberg, chairman of Baltimore's Republican Party and longtime GOP voice across the state, called here last December with...
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | December 5, 2001
PEOPLE OFTEN ASK me: When are you going to write an opera about Parris Glendening? To which I respond: Like, never. Let's face it, he's not exactly Scarpia. There's an element of Don Giovanni there but an equal amount of Don Knotts. The governor of Maryland just doesn't give much in the way of operatic inspiration: He split up with his wife. He reportedly hooked up with a younger woman on his staff. But ol' Parris couldn't even do that with drama; a potential five-course feast of scandal never got beyond a dull, little dinner for two at Cracker Barrel.
NEWS
March 24, 1995
It's politically embarrassing for the governor of Maryland to take his family for a Sunday outing aboard the state's own yacht. Even though that's one of the intended purposes of the craft. Even though the Maryland Independence would otherwise sit idly in Annapolis harbor with a full crew.In these times of intense skepticism of public officials, the mere thought of a governor cruising in a state-owned yacht raises hackles. It is a symbol of wealth and privilege that a popularly elected official should avoid.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | July 26, 1994
The friends of William Donald Schaefer are giving him an edifice complex. Also, a complex of edifices. In an effort to assure Schaefer that his good works are appreciated and will be remembered as long as there are potholes in alleys, they're naming structures hither and yon for the governor of Maryland.It's like the old beer commercial: Schaefer -- the one name to put on a building, when you're naming more than one.As documented by Sun reporter Ed Gunts, a sort of orgy of Schaefer memorializing has broken out across the state, with plazas here, circles there, and buildings everywhere, either because:a)
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