Advertisement
HomeCollectionsGovernor Clinton
IN THE NEWS

Governor Clinton

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Art Buchwald | October 6, 1992
EVERY MEDIA person has a Walter Mitty fantasy that he or she will be called to single-handedly moderate a debate between President Bush and Governor Clinton. I am no different from anybody else. I have a dream that I will be selected because I know how to pose the tough questions that Americans want their presidential candidates to answer."Mr. President, that's a nice suit you're wearing. Did you have it tailored or did you buy it off the rack?""Governor Clinton, you were a Rhodes scholar at Oxford.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 11, 2003
SANTA FE, N.M. - As the confrontation between the United States and North Korea deepened yesterday, two North Korean diplomats spent the day here trying - through an intermediary, Gov. Bill Richardson - to explain what their country seeks from Washington in return for de-escalating its nuclear ambitions. Although Richardson did not talk publicly, he was said to be in constant communication with Secretary of State Colin L. Powell, as a divided administration sought an opening of dialogue with a government it has barely talked to during the past two years.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Carol Emert and Carol Emert,States News Service | January 21, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Democratic presidential candidate Bill Clinton will be campaigning in Maryland tonight with no pointed messages for special interest groups."
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith and C. Fraser Smith,SUN STAFF | September 6, 1998
Gov. Parris N. Glendening chastised President Clinton yesterday for failing to provide a positive role model for American youth and confirmed that an invitation to Clinton for a Glendening fund-raiser next month has been withdrawn.The governor called on the president to offer a "major, sincere apology."The president said in Ireland Friday that he was "sorry" for his "inappropriate" sexual relationship with former White House intern Monica S. Lewinsky, but Glendening joined a chorus of critics who have urged Clinton to be even more apologetic.
NEWS
February 20, 1992
"New Hampshire tonight has made Bill Clinton the comeback kid," the Arkansas governor said Tuesday night. He was referring to the fact that many political commentators had pronounced his candidacy dead or dying after he was accused first of having an affair with singer Gennifer Flowers through most of the 1980s and then of dodging the draft in the 1960s. In his view and that of many others, Governor Clinton's second place finish in the Democratic half of the New Hampshire presidential primary was a stunning comeback.
NEWS
April 10, 1992
Paul Tsongas was correct to decide not to re-enter the Democratic presidential race. Even with money available or promised on the basis of "draft" efforts by voters in Connecticut, New York and to a lesser degree in Kansas and Wisconsin, he would end up playing only a "spoiler" role, as he acknowledged. Jerry Brown's continued candidacy does not have the potential to tarnish front-runner Bill Clinton's presumed nomination nearly as much as does a Tsongas candidacy. People take Mr. Tsongas' criticism of Governor Clinton a lot more seriously than they take Mr. Brown's.
NEWS
January 10, 1992
Virginia Gov. L. Douglas Wilder's decision to quit the Democratic presidential race was forced upon him. He had been unable to mount a credible campaign -- as polls, coverage and fund raising all showed. Had he stayed in, he probably would have lost badly and might even have been humiliated. His problem was that he came on too fast, too soon, beginning a presidential quest even before he had warmed the governor's chair in Richmond.Who among the remaining Democratic candidates will benefit?
NEWS
May 16, 1992
Gov. Bill Clinton announced Tuesday that he has formed a vice presidential search committee. This came in a week when the Arkansan was getting some good news and some bad news. Mostly bad news. The good news was that he easily won the West Virginia primary. He beat Jerry Brown 74 percent to 12 percent. Now for the bad news:* He won the Nebraska primary with less than half the votes. He got 48 percent to Mr. Brown's 22 percent, but "uncommitted" got 17 percent and Paul Tsongas and others got 12 percent.
NEWS
By REG MURPHY | October 28, 1992
There is an uncomfortable man in Little Rock named Paul Greenberg. He writes political commentary for the largest newspaper in Arkansas. And he doesn't care for Gov. Bill Clinton.''If there is a lodestar in his [Clinton's] career, it is the constant search for re-election, period. We may not have seen the dimensions of this emptiness yet in an American president,'' Mr. Greenberg said.Then he compares Governor Clinton to former President Jimmy Carter. He said to a reporter the other day that Mr. Clinton has lived in the ''thin intellectual milieu'' of Arkansas, and that Mr. Carter had a wider understanding of how the world works.
NEWS
February 7, 1992
With less than two weeks to go before New Hampshire votes, and less than four weeks before Maryland votes, polls suggest the formal Democratic candidates are not convincing citizens they are of presidential stature.In New Hampshire, the latest daily tracking poll by the American Research Group shows Gov. Bill Clinton ahead of the weak field with 37 percent, with "undecided" second at 23. Nationally, according to a Los Angeles Times poll, "undecided" is just ahead of Governor Clinton, 34-31 percent.
NEWS
By Asmaa Malik and Asmaa Malik,CAPITAL NEWS SERVICE | March 8, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Former Maryland Gov. William Donald Schaefer, who four years ago confounded his fellow Democrats by supporting George Bush's re-election for president over Bill Clinton, is at it again.Mr. Schaefer said yesterday he supports Republican Bob Dole's presidential bid."I just don't think the president is up to the job," Mr. Schaefer said of President Clinton. "He doesn't follow through with his plans. He's played politics all along."Mr. Schaefer, 74, said in a telephone interview that Mr. Clinton is "clever enough a good-looking guy" who can "convince you of anything."
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 7, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole got a second chance yesterday to show skeptics that he's not outclassed as a television-era presidential candidate by the man who holds the job he covets.In a speech to the National Governors' Association -- just before President Clinton gave his own speech -- Mr. Dole demonstrated that he still has some kick left. Even White House officials, who watched Mr. Dole yesterday on C-SPAN, allowed that the nTC senator had acquitted himself well."I thought he was good," said Ginny Terzano, the deputy White House press secretary.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Sun Staff Writer Sun staff writer Karen Hosler contributed to this article | August 1, 1995
BURLINGTON, Vt. -- President Clinton tried yesterday to reclaim the momentum for welfare reform from the Republican-led Congress, but got a hostile reception from the nation's GOP governors.Earlier in the day, Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole gave the governors the first peek at the welfare reform bill he and his fTC colleagues will take up later this week, declaring that it is his approach, not Mr. Clinton's, that will fulfill the president's 3-year-old promise to "end welfare as we know it."
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 25, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Republicans presented President Clinton last night as a reluctant convert to the cause of a smaller, cheaper government more attuned to the needs of the middle class.Casting themselves as the authentic agents of change, the Republicans also suggested that Mr. Clinton's actions would not match his conservative words."While at times tonight some of the president's ideas sounded pretty Republican, the fact remains that he has been opposed to the balanced-budget amendment, he proposed even more government spending, and he imposed the biggest tax increase in American history," Gov. Christine Todd Whitman of New Jersey said in remarks prepared for delivery on behalf of her party.
NEWS
May 11, 1994
Paula Corbin Jones says Bill Clinton made a coarse physical pass at her in a Little Rock hotel room. Her far-from-verified story presents a Bill Clinton who considers some women interchangeable, disposable sex objects for men of power.That was in May 1991. Sexual harassment suits were not as in vogue then as they are today. It perhaps did not occur to Miss Corbin that she take legal action (though the Supreme Court had ruled in 1986 that sexual harassment was illegal). But in October 1991 along came Anita Hill and Clarence Thomas.
NEWS
By From Staff Reports | December 6, 1992
LITTLE ROCK, Ark. -- Will Hillary Clinton have a major role at the White House? You bet, says President-elect Bill Clinton's communications director, George Stephanopoulos."
NEWS
March 10, 1992
Super Tuesday is going to be a big delegate-winning day for Arkansas Gov. Bill Clinton, according to all the polls, but a glance at the map shows why all it will prove about his candidacy is that he is a regional favorite. One of the three states holding caucuses today and five of the eight states holding primaries share a border with Arkansas.All told, Missouri (caucus) and Tennessee, Mississippi, Louisiana, Texas and Oklahoma (primaries) will elect 443 of the 783 delegates at stake today (100 superdelegates not included)
NEWS
March 26, 1992
Downplaying the harm down to Gov. Bill Clinton in the Connecticut primary, Democratic National Committee Chairman Ronald H. Brown said, "I've never known a nominee who wins everywhere, every day." You can tell he's a Democrat. George Bush has won everywhere every day this year. Four years ago, Mr. Bush won everywhere every day after a single loss in South Dakota in February. Ronald Reagan won everywhere every day in 1984 and almost did in 1980.One of the Democratic Party's greatest weaknesses in presidential politics is this instinct to turn on its front-runners, as the voters did in Connecticut Tuesday.
NEWS
November 8, 1992
"I think Governor Cuomo would be a good Supreme Court justice. He is a legal scholar who also understands the impact of the law on real people." -- Gov. Bill Clinton, June 16, on beingasked to name prospective court appointees."I'm a lawyer. I've always said I wanted to be on the [New York] Court of Appeals. It would be disingenuous of me now to say 'the idea of being on the Supreme Court means nothing to me. . . .'-- Governor Cuomo, Nov. 4.That there will be at least one vacancy on the Supreme Court in President Clinton's term is taken for granted in Washington.
NEWS
November 2, 1992
The following editorial is reprinted from the York County Coast Star, of Kennebunkport, Maine.Voters have clear alternatives this November in their choice for president. The competing candidates have stated their positions on many issues, but the one issue that looms over all is that of the economy.Both President Bush and Governor Clinton have solid proposals, many of which have merit. Both Mr. Bush and Mr. Clinton support the North American Free Trade Agreement, but Mr. Clinton wants restrictions that would protect American jobs in the short term.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.