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NEWS
December 10, 2012
As a taxpayer and a private-sector employee all my life, why should I feel sorry for the federal employees who, on average, make more money than me, have a better pension than I do, have more vacation time to be with their families, and work fewer hours ("Federal workers rally, underscore their sacrifices," Dec. 6)? The Wall Street Journal just published the results of the American Time Use Survey, which the Bureau of Labor Statistics administers to a large and representative sample of American households each year.
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NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | October 6, 2014
Barack Obama had a choice between liberalism and the Democratic Party. He chose the latter and it cost him dearly. Liberalism, as an ideology, insists that government can do good and great things for the people and the world, if the people running the government are smart liberals.The Democratic Party says the exact same thing. But liberalism is an ideal, while the Democratic Party is that ideal's representative here in the real world, and in the real world political parties disappoint.
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NEWS
April 9, 2013
As talk of the sequester ratchets upward in the ranks of government employees who might be affected ("Sequester furloughs begin for U.S. public defenders," April 4), here's a quick word of advice: Keep the whining to yourselves! While readers generally do not like to hear of the government's heavy handed financial impact on fellow citizens, the vast majority don't shed crocodile tears over discussions of government employee furloughs "of up to 14 days. " Before posting lengthy editorials on the possible negative effects of the sequester, please consider how those in the private sector - outside of the golden triangle of government contractors, finance and health care - have been brutalized by the recession.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
The workers who staff the federal government in Washington are whiter, richer, more educated and more liberal than the rest of the country, according to two political scientists at Johns Hopkins University —who warn of the potential for a troubling gap between the federal workforce and the people it serves. "It might be a problem," said Jennifer Bachner, director of the Hopkins' master's degree program in government analytics. "If the government looks very different demographically than the American people, the question is: Can they govern well?
NEWS
December 13, 2011
Once again, Marta Mossburg displays her disturbing obsession with public employees, as she plays the apologist for the wealthiest Marylanders ("In Maryland, your taxes support many of the one percent," Dec. 7). Ms. Mossburg is again muddying the waters about America's increasing income disparity that has been so clearly documented. Mirroring rhetoric that was bought and paid for by the multimillionaire Koch brothers in Wisconsin, and puppeted by Gov. Scott Walker, Ms. Mossburg has attempted to convince us that public employees are the problem with today's economy.
NEWS
February 18, 2011
I've heard and read about the demonstrations of state workers whose salaries and benefits are being cut or at least kept from increasing. Through talk radio, many workers try to say that they have already suffered from quality of life issues, but I noticed a real disconnect. I don't think that government workers realize that the tax payers they are appealing to make about half as much salary, suffered from a lack of raises in direct income for at least six straight years, not to mention having seriously reduced benefits.
NEWS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,Contributing Writer | March 20, 1994
*TC COLLEGE PARK -- Members of the Maryland Legislative Black Caucus heard more complaints of racism yesterday from dozens of state government workers who testified at a hearing at the University of Maryland here.The workers took part in the second caucus hearing on racism in state government.Such was the nature of the complaints from University of Maryland workers that the senator running the hearing said outside of the room that the caucus should consider creative ways of applying pressure to stop racist activity.
NEWS
By NEAL R. PEIRCE | July 19, 1993
As the rest of the world becomes more keenly competitive,America's 87,000 state and local governments lag years behind the times in how they motivate, hire, promote and fire their 15.5 million employees.For the safety of our drinking water, education of our children, policing of our communities, public health, highways and much more, we all depend intimately on state and local government workers. Yet the national future could be threatened if states and bTC localities keep postponing dramatic personnel reform.
NEWS
By Neal Thompson and Neal Thompson,SUN STAFF | September 16, 1999
A decision this year by Aberdeen Proving Ground to allow a private company to cut government jobs and hire its own work force -- which would could have led to the loss of 558 jobs at the Harford County base -- has been overturned on appeal. An Army-wide effort to save costs by privatizing services had prompted the Aberdeen Proving Ground to award a contract in May to a private company, Aberdeen Technical Services, which had outbid the Army for building and grounds maintenance, environmental and safety operations, child care and recreational activities, such as movie theaters and sports programs.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 18, 2002
LONDON - Hundreds of thousands of local government workers went on strike across much of Britain yesterday, shutting schools, leaving garbage uncollected and closing libraries, museums and recreation centers in a bitter dispute over pay. The strike, which union leaders estimated was joined by about 750,000 people, was the first such national action since the so-called Winter of Discontent in 1979, when a series of strikes paralyzed the country. Yesterday's strike affected different parts of the country differently, but had the most impact on Northern Ireland, Wales and places such as Newcastle, Manchester and Leeds in England's north.
NEWS
October 1, 2014
If you like an U.S. attorney general who ignores government workers pleading the Fifth Amendment, doesn't support following the laws of the country and lies to Congress, then Eric Holder is your man ( "The Holder legacy," Sept. 28). Hopefully, the next AG will support the other 95 percent of us. Lyle Rescott, Marriottsville - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
NEWS
August 21, 2014
Like most Marylanders and American taxpayers, I have grown tired of government workers never being held accountable for the job they are hired to do. Who were the city engineer and city official who decided to park tons of cars on the side of a street that was supported by a 100-plus-year-old retaining wall ( "Mayor meets with residents over E. 26th Street collapse," Aug. 17), and do these employees still work for the city? J. Heming, Baltimore - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
NEWS
August 3, 2014
What a message these so-called lawmakers are sending to government workers by authorizing billions of dollars more to the Department of Veterans Affairs ( "Veterans vent about poor VA medical care," July 29). The spending suggests it's OK to falsify government records and steal taxpayers' dollars in the form of bonuses because we will give you more money and, by the way, you may be fired or demoted but not prosecuted. J. Heming, Baltimore - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | June 23, 2014
For understandable reasons, the IRS scandal has largely focused on the political question of whether the White House deliberately targeted opponents. To date there's no evidence that it did. That's good for the president, but it may not be good for the country, because if the administration didn't target opponents, that would mean the IRS has become corrupt all on its own. In 1939, Bruno Rizzi, a largely forgotten communist intellectual, wrote a hugely controversial book, "The Bureaucratization of the World.
NEWS
January 22, 2014
Public employees have a right to be represented by a union and to collective bargaining in states like Maryland where the law allows it. And the only way such a system can work - at least on a practical level - is to require all those government workers represented by the union to pay for the costs of the bargaining that makes those benefits possible. Such an arrangement is commonplace and reasonable, yet it's being challenged in a lawsuit heard Tuesday by the U.S. Supreme Court.
NEWS
By John McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | November 16, 2013
A fellow editor takes note of this passage from a New York Times article out of Quinapondan, Philippines:  “My people are starving,” he tells the government workers, whose requisition notebooks do not favor this rural flyspeck, population 16,525. It's all in perspective. Before I became a big-time journalist and subordinate member of the East Coast liberal media establishment, I grew up in a little tobacco-farming town, Elizaville, Kentucky, population then about 100. The county seat, Flemingsburg, had about 2,000.
NEWS
By John Rivera | February 5, 1992
Thanks to the generosity of government workers, the United Way of Central Maryland raised a record $39 million in its 1991 campaign.The donations from government workers more than made up for a shortfall in the private sector blamed on the recession, the United Way said yesterday.Donations from the private-sector categories, many from companies hard hit by the recession, fell about $1.8 million below their $33.2 million goal, campaign officials said.The top 50 companies that have in the past raised more than $100,000 each for the United Way had 14,000 fewer employees in 1991 because of layoffs and hiring freezes, United Way spokesman Mel Tansill said.
NEWS
October 23, 2013
Last Sunday's edition had a couple of topics that merit responses. JP Morgan Chase's record $13 billion tentative settlement with the U.S. Justice Department concerning the alleged misrepresentation of residential mortgage-backed securities begs the question, why did this take so long and why was this bank singled out while Goldman Sachs, which also sold such securities, was not? Could it be due to Goldman's close ties with the Obama administration? With regard to the recession's cause being these risky sub prime mortgage-related financial instruments, columnist Robert L Ehrlich Jr. provided some timely insight, placing some of blame on regulators and politicians (Rep.
NEWS
October 15, 2013
It's no surprise that the liberal media and The Sun blame the government shutdown - or slim down - on Republicans, the tea party and Texas Sen. Ted Cruz ( "Grow up, Congress," Oct. 14). But The Sun comes up short when it comes to facts about the shutdown. The Republican-controlled House of Representatives voted the money required to keep all government activities going with the exception of Obamacare. This is not a matter of opinion, it is in the Congressional Record. As for the House's right to grant or withhold money, that is not a matter of opinion either.
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