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NEWS
By Consella A. Lee and Consella A. Lee,SUN STAFF | September 13, 1996
County Executive John G. Gary signed a letter of intent yesterday that would allow construction to start next spring on the last undeveloped parcel in the Glen Burnie Urban Renewal district."
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BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2011
Electric wagons powered by heavy batteries quietly zipped through the streets of Baltimore, carrying beer, milk, fruit and other goods from wholesalers to shops and homes. Some delivery companies installed their own charging stations or used a downtown garage maintained by the local utility to charge their wagons overnight. This experimental period in transportation wasn't during the gasoline price shocks of the early 1970s. Try 1911. Electric vehicles would grow to account for about one-quarter of the automobiles in the United States by the 1920s, historians estimate.
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NEWS
July 29, 1994
It won't be news to Marylanders that the bounty of the ocean, like that of the Chesapeake Bay, has its limits -- and that those limits are being breached. A new report from the Worldwatch Institute, a non-profit environmental research organization, details the forces that are severely straining fisheries around the world.The trends are not encouraging. After years of growth, the marine catch has stagnated or fallen in all but two of the 15 major fishing areas around the globe. Since 1989, the worldwide catch has declined by 5 percent and, for the first time since World War II, has fallen behind the increase in population.
NEWS
By Bonnie Raitt and Harvey Wasserman | November 7, 2007
A clause in the landmark energy bill now before Congress could open the door for massive loan guarantees meant to entice investors to build nuclear power plants. This is an extremely important piece of legislation, and we strongly support its green features, including higher mileage standards for motor vehicles and a renewable electricity standard. But as longtime anti-nuclear activists, we believe guaranteeing loans to build new reactors is exactly wrong for a nation that needs to solve the global warming crisis while building a sustainable economy.
NEWS
By Mike Tidwell | October 14, 2002
IMAGINE a madman of a different stripe, one whose preferred method of mischief is eco-terrorism, not run-of-the-mill weapons of mass destruction. Imagine he has built a Doomsday Environmental Machine that at the touch of a button can spew millions of tons of carbon dioxide into the air or raise ocean levels by several feet or destabilize stockpiles of nuclear reactor waste. Now, imagine also that Mr. Madman receives billions of dollars in direct U.S. aid to help make his malevolent dreams come true.
NEWS
October 21, 1990
World trade negotiations are nearing the panic stage as the much-vaunted European Community fails again and again to get its act together on agriculture policy. Not only are its 12 member states at odds but its farm ministers, as a group, cannot agree with its trade ministers, as a group. Talks under the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) thus are stymied just seven weeks before what was to be the conclusion of the four-year Uruguay Round of bargaining, the most comprehensive in commercial history.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | December 10, 2002
GENEVA - An appellate panel of the World Trade Organization said yesterday that the United States may levy duties on imports from formerly state-owned European steelmakers, provided the U.S. Commerce Department changes the way it calculates the tariffs. A WTO appellate panel overturned parts of an earlier WTO ruling, setting the stage for the United States to retain the taxes of as much as 37 percent by making a new calculation. Under the panel's ruling, the duties can be imposed if the United States has determined that steelmakers including Arcelor of Luxembourg, the world's biggest, and Germany's ThyssenKrupp AG, weren't sold to the private sector for a fair price.
NEWS
By ANDREW SHARPLESS | March 21, 2006
Little-noticed but enormously significant steps were taken recently in World Trade Organization negotiations to rid the world's fishing industry of government subsidies that provide incentives to fish the oceans to death. For the first time since the launch of the WTO's current round of talks in 2001, member nations have moved beyond the consensus that many fishing subsidies lead to overfishing and destructive practices. At least five countries have submitted detailed proposals on eliminating these subsidies, and serious negotiations are under way. It is a step beyond rhetoric toward resolution on what is the greatest single action that can be taken to ensure the future viability of ocean ecosystems and the bounty they produce.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Sun Staff Correspondent | February 20, 1995
KEMEROVO, Russia -- Coal miners, the grimy-faced heroes of the Soviet era who went on to become the saviors of reform, are once again in the front lines of a struggle over the nation's destiny.They are forcing the Russian government to reveal the degree of its commitment to reform by threatening a mining strike March 1 unless the government invests millions of dollars in the troubled coal industry, which has failed to pay the miners' salaries for months.At issue are government subsidies given to keep unprofitable industries alive.
NEWS
By GEORGE F. WILL | April 23, 1992
Washington -- Is nothing sacred? Evidently not. Even public television is being questioned by some conservatives who evidently do not understand the importance of being earnest.Some troglodyte Neanderthal Puritan Yahoo philistine reactionary inquisitorial Victorian barbarian blue-nosed Cromwellian know-nothing Savonarolas -- that is, conservatives, as the public television lobby sees them -- are wondering why taxpayers should give another $1.1 billion to public television.A good question.
NEWS
By ANDREW SHARPLESS | March 21, 2006
Little-noticed but enormously significant steps were taken recently in World Trade Organization negotiations to rid the world's fishing industry of government subsidies that provide incentives to fish the oceans to death. For the first time since the launch of the WTO's current round of talks in 2001, member nations have moved beyond the consensus that many fishing subsidies lead to overfishing and destructive practices. At least five countries have submitted detailed proposals on eliminating these subsidies, and serious negotiations are under way. It is a step beyond rhetoric toward resolution on what is the greatest single action that can be taken to ensure the future viability of ocean ecosystems and the bounty they produce.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | January 23, 2005
In 2002, the farmers of Zambia were starving, eating leaves, sticks and poisonous berries in an attempt to survive the worst famine to rake southern Africa in years. President Levy Mwanawasa declared an emergency. But when the United States offered a shipment of corn, he rejected it, insisting his people would rather starve than eat genetically-modified American grain. The American agriculture industry was flummoxed. They had been tinkering with the DNA of crops to make it resistant to pests and herbicides, and regarded the results as healthier and better than the food produced "naturally."
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | December 10, 2002
GENEVA - An appellate panel of the World Trade Organization said yesterday that the United States may levy duties on imports from formerly state-owned European steelmakers, provided the U.S. Commerce Department changes the way it calculates the tariffs. A WTO appellate panel overturned parts of an earlier WTO ruling, setting the stage for the United States to retain the taxes of as much as 37 percent by making a new calculation. Under the panel's ruling, the duties can be imposed if the United States has determined that steelmakers including Arcelor of Luxembourg, the world's biggest, and Germany's ThyssenKrupp AG, weren't sold to the private sector for a fair price.
NEWS
By Mike Tidwell | October 14, 2002
IMAGINE a madman of a different stripe, one whose preferred method of mischief is eco-terrorism, not run-of-the-mill weapons of mass destruction. Imagine he has built a Doomsday Environmental Machine that at the touch of a button can spew millions of tons of carbon dioxide into the air or raise ocean levels by several feet or destabilize stockpiles of nuclear reactor waste. Now, imagine also that Mr. Madman receives billions of dollars in direct U.S. aid to help make his malevolent dreams come true.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 21, 2002
YUBA CITY, Calif. -- His home? In a former walnut grove turned housing development. His childhood neighborhood, where he used to pedal between the bread-baking grandma and the pie-making grandma? A swath of disappearing peach orchards. That rise in the landscape that everyone calls Chicken Hill? A one-time chicken ranch turned into a housing development of 5-acre lots. "This is what I don't want to see happen to the rice land," says Keith Davis. "I want it to remain farmland." Davis, a rice farmer in northern California for more than three decades, will probably get that wish, even as calls are growing across the country to limit the government subsidies that have helped keep afloat the growers of commodity crops -- rice, corn, wheat -- as other farmers fall by the wayside.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 20, 2000
WASHINGTON - Within two years, 13 million federal workers, retirees and military personnel will be able to purchase long-term care insurance at group rates under a measure signed into law yesterday by President Clinton. Like many private employers who offer such insurance, the federal government will not subsidize the premiums for long-term care policies. But advocates of the bill, which include a cross-section of lawmakers from both parties as well as the administration, said the law would make it easier for federal employees to prepare for their long-term health needs and encourage more private employers to make such group policies available.
NEWS
By Robert Kuttner | April 15, 1992
THE OLD imagery of "free traders" versus "protectionists" is giving way to a much more practical and less ideological search for common rules to govern trade among nations. The latest of these is the tentative agreement between the United States and the European Community limiting government subsidies for the development of aircraft.This agreement, whose final details are still being hammered out, is emblematic of the new pragmatism. The deal, reached after six years of talks,would limit direct subsidies to about one-third of a plane's total development costs, and indirect subsidies to about 5 percent of them.
NEWS
By Neal R. Peirce | May 5, 1997
THREE CHEERS for Ohio. In a move no other state has yet had the smarts (or guts) to undertake, Ohio is launching a study of the subsidies and payoffs its governments give away to lure industries.Immense sums of our money is spent -- outright grants or taxes uncollected -- so a state or locality can snare a factory, underwrite an enterprise zone, build an industrial park or finance some private owner's ballpark. The national total, some experts believe, easily tops $5 billion a year.The Ohio subsidy study, conceived and now chaired by state Sen. Charles F. Horn, a Republican from suburban Dayton, proposes to measure both benefit and cost of government subsidies: What is their net impact on a state's economy and welfare?
NEWS
By George F. Will | October 14, 1999
ST. PAUL, Minn. -- Lenin said that any cook can run the state. The wrestler running this one believes, as Lenin did not, what Lenin said.Jesse Ventura, a human Vesuvius who does not believe in hoarding himself, has Minnesota so well in hand he has time to give interviews promiscuously -- 25 a week, he says.Nowadays these include interviews to tidy up after interviews, such as the one in Playboy wherein he said organized religion is for the weak-minded (such as Mrs. Ventura, he later explained)
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 22, 1997
UNITED NATIONS -- As world leaders converge this week to take stock of the global environment five years after the Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, a growing number of experts say that government subsidies to a range of industries not only squander money that could be spent cleaning up the Earth but also actually damage it.Subsidies for energy suppliers, water services, road building, agriculture and fisheries, and other activities often have side...
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