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October 23, 2012
The Baltimore Washington Region Government Procurement Fair will be held Wednesday, Oct. 31, 8 a.m. to noon, at Martins Crosswinds, 7400 Greenway Center Drive, in Greenbelt. More than 50 government agencies will be present. Informational sessions and one-on-one sessions with buyers will be available. Registration begins 7:30 a.m. The prepaid price for Baltimore Washington Corridor Chamber members is $65; nonmembers $95; all at the door, $125. Register at http://www.baltwashchamber.org/events and click on Government Procurement Fair.
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NEWS
By E.R. Shipp | August 3, 2014
If you are black and have done business with the city or the state - or have even thought of it - you probably know the name Arnold Jolivet. If you are a politician who has anything at all to do with granting government contracts, you definitely know that name. People like me, on the other hand, who go about our lives without giving a thought about procurement processes, probably know nothing of the man that a city official, a construction contractor and a staunch critic of city government admiringly described to me as a warrior.
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BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | September 27, 1994
TOKYO -- With a deadline looming Friday in trade talks with the United States, Japan's trade minister will leave for Washington today in a last-ditch effort to avert sanctions against his country.Ryutaro Hashimoto, the minister of international trade and industry, is expected to meet tomorrow with Mickey Kantor, the U.S. trade representative, and probably with Commerce Secretary Ronald H. Brown, officials here said yesterday. Mr. Hashimoto and Mr. Kantor spoke by telephone yesterday morning.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | February 2, 2013
Catonsville-based Alpha Omega Technologies performs work for one federal agency, and it wants more contracts - a daunting goal for a small company in a time of tight budgets. But the head of the 25-person software firm thinks he has a leg up after months of assistance from industry veterans, introductions to federal decision-makers, advice about how to get a foot in the door with the National Security Agency, and lots of specifics about how other companies succeeded or got tripped up in pursuing and handling federal work.
NEWS
By William Hawkins | June 17, 2005
WASHINGTON - The Central America Free Trade Agreement debate is heating up, and one part of the proposed pact has not received the attention it deserves - an overlooked section that offers further evidence why Congress should emphatically reject CAFTA. Chapter 9 of the agreement covers government procurement and establishes a rule of "national treatment" in government purchasing. This means that under CAFTA, each participating nation must treat goods, services and suppliers from the other CAFTA nations in a manner that is "no less favorable" than it treats domestic firms when awarding contracts.
NEWS
January 9, 1993
Several years ago, "Europe '92" was the hottest topic of economic futurists. What would happen when 12 markets became one, when an engineering design specification good in one country needed no change for the other 11, when a sausage meeting health standards in one met them in all, when people traveled from one to another without bothering to show papers?Would U.S. business be ready for the challenge and the opportunity? The phrase Europe '92, the year in which all the bureaucratic changes would be accomplished, really meant '93, the first day of which all changes would be in effect.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | September 8, 1994
WASHINGTON -- U.S. and Japanese trade officials said yesterday that they were making progress toward agreements to open Japan's controlled markets in insurance and government purchasing.But they said that talks on getting Japan to buy more U.S. cars and auto parts were still deadlocked and that no accord was likely anytime soon.Both U.S. and Japanese officials emphasized that they still have much work to do to close the deals on insurance and Japanese government procurement -- particularly the procurement of telecommunications equipment by Japan's state-owned phone monopoly.
BUSINESS
By Thomas Easton and Thomas Easton,Tokyo Bureau of The Sun | October 3, 1994
TOKYO -- Even before the official announcement of a trade deal with the United States, the sniping over terms had begun.Business leaders qualified their relief with caveats. The applause of politicians was hedged by complaints over unresolved issues that could lead to U.S. sanctions. Most disturbing, participants differed on the crucial issue of whether Japan really committed itself to increasing the purchase of imported goods.Perhaps the most positive reaction stemmed from what did not happen.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | February 2, 2013
Catonsville-based Alpha Omega Technologies performs work for one federal agency, and it wants more contracts - a daunting goal for a small company in a time of tight budgets. But the head of the 25-person software firm thinks he has a leg up after months of assistance from industry veterans, introductions to federal decision-makers, advice about how to get a foot in the door with the National Security Agency, and lots of specifics about how other companies succeeded or got tripped up in pursuing and handling federal work.
NEWS
By E.R. Shipp | August 3, 2014
If you are black and have done business with the city or the state - or have even thought of it - you probably know the name Arnold Jolivet. If you are a politician who has anything at all to do with granting government contracts, you definitely know that name. People like me, on the other hand, who go about our lives without giving a thought about procurement processes, probably know nothing of the man that a city official, a construction contractor and a staunch critic of city government admiringly described to me as a warrior.
EXPLORE
October 23, 2012
The Baltimore Washington Region Government Procurement Fair will be held Wednesday, Oct. 31, 8 a.m. to noon, at Martins Crosswinds, 7400 Greenway Center Drive, in Greenbelt. More than 50 government agencies will be present. Informational sessions and one-on-one sessions with buyers will be available. Registration begins 7:30 a.m. The prepaid price for Baltimore Washington Corridor Chamber members is $65; nonmembers $95; all at the door, $125. Register at http://www.baltwashchamber.org/events and click on Government Procurement Fair.
EXPLORE
November 16, 2011
"Fueling Your Finances for Contracts" is the topic of the Baltimore Washington Corridor Chamber's GOVCON Government Procurement information session, Wednesday, Nov. 30 from 7:45 to 10:30 a.m. at Overhills Mansion, 916 S. Rolling Road, in Catonsville. Panelists include: Randy Croxton, senior vice president, Meridian Management Group, Inc., Maryland Small Business Development Financing Authority; Stan Arnold, Commerical Relationships Manager, Sandy Spring Bank vice president; and Richard Lewis, president and CEO of Financial Engineering Counselors Ltd. Cost is $25 for prepaid members; $45 for members not prepaid and non-members.
NEWS
By William Hawkins | June 17, 2005
WASHINGTON - The Central America Free Trade Agreement debate is heating up, and one part of the proposed pact has not received the attention it deserves - an overlooked section that offers further evidence why Congress should emphatically reject CAFTA. Chapter 9 of the agreement covers government procurement and establishes a rule of "national treatment" in government purchasing. This means that under CAFTA, each participating nation must treat goods, services and suppliers from the other CAFTA nations in a manner that is "no less favorable" than it treats domestic firms when awarding contracts.
BUSINESS
By Greg Schneider and Greg Schneider,Sun Staff | January 24, 1999
Being next door to Washington, D.C., might seem like a curse when it comes to traffic and scandal, but it is a blessing for Maryland in at least one sense:The state's businesses do a whopping commerce with the federal government.The amount of money the feds spend in Maryland each year on salaries and products continues to almost equal the annual state budget. In 1997, the most recent year for which statistics are available, federal procurement, salaries and wages totaled $16 billion -- compared to a state budget of $16.6 billion.
BUSINESS
By Thomas Easton and Thomas Easton,Tokyo Bureau of The Sun | October 3, 1994
TOKYO -- Even before the official announcement of a trade deal with the United States, the sniping over terms had begun.Business leaders qualified their relief with caveats. The applause of politicians was hedged by complaints over unresolved issues that could lead to U.S. sanctions. Most disturbing, participants differed on the crucial issue of whether Japan really committed itself to increasing the purchase of imported goods.Perhaps the most positive reaction stemmed from what did not happen.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | September 27, 1994
TOKYO -- With a deadline looming Friday in trade talks with the United States, Japan's trade minister will leave for Washington today in a last-ditch effort to avert sanctions against his country.Ryutaro Hashimoto, the minister of international trade and industry, is expected to meet tomorrow with Mickey Kantor, the U.S. trade representative, and probably with Commerce Secretary Ronald H. Brown, officials here said yesterday. Mr. Hashimoto and Mr. Kantor spoke by telephone yesterday morning.
EXPLORE
November 16, 2011
"Fueling Your Finances for Contracts" is the topic of the Baltimore Washington Corridor Chamber's GOVCON Government Procurement information session, Wednesday, Nov. 30 from 7:45 to 10:30 a.m. at Overhills Mansion, 916 S. Rolling Road, in Catonsville. Panelists include: Randy Croxton, senior vice president, Meridian Management Group, Inc., Maryland Small Business Development Financing Authority; Stan Arnold, Commerical Relationships Manager, Sandy Spring Bank vice president; and Richard Lewis, president and CEO of Financial Engineering Counselors Ltd. Cost is $25 for prepaid members; $45 for members not prepaid and non-members.
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