Advertisement
HomeCollectionsGovernment Operations
IN THE NEWS

Government Operations

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 23, 2006
House of Delegates convenes at 10 a.m. Senate convenes at 10 a.m. Hearings of interest: The House Environment Matters Committee holds a working session on eminent domain issues. The meeting is scheduled to begin at 11 a.m. in the Lowe House Office Building committee room. The House Health and Government Operations and Ways and Means committees hold a joint hearing on a bill (HB 3) to create a scholarship program for military veterans who served in Iraq and Afghanistan.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
Robert B. Reich | July 16, 2014
Dozens of big U.S. corporations are considering leaving the United States in order to reduce their tax bills. But they'll be leaving the country only on paper. They'll still do as much business in the U.S. as they were doing before. The only difference is they'll no longer be "American" and won't have to pay nearly as much in taxes to the U.S. government. OK. But if they're no longer American citizens, they should no longer be able to spend a penny influencing American politics.
Advertisement
NEWS
November 15, 1995
PRESIDENT CLINTON is clobbering the Republicans in the blame game over the partial shutdown of government operations. No way, he says, will he agree that the current $46.10 monthly premium senior citizens pay for Medicare Part B will be increased to $53. He wants the payment lowered to $42.50, as current law provides.Mr. Clinton's stand is wildly popular with the old folks even though higher Social Security benefits next year would more than outweigh the projected GOP increase in Medicare charges.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2013
Lawmakers in Congress made no progress Tuesday on ending the budget impasse that has thrown federal agencies in Maryland and elsewhere into the first government shutdown since 1996. There was little indication that either side was prepared to negotiate, as Republicans continued to demand changes to President Barack Obama's health care law in exchange for spending legislation, and Democrats insisted that the issue had already been litigated - and they won. Obama, using some of his sharpest language so far on the budget showdown, said legislation to reopen the government would not be achieved until Republicans in the House of Representatives stopped holding "the entire economy hostage" over what he described as ideological demands.
NEWS
By Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2013
Gov. Martin O'Malley's sweeping gun bill that has stalled in the House of Delegates will get a key committee vote on Friday, delegates said. The Maryland Senate in February moved swiftly on legislation that would ban the sale of assault-style rifles, limit magazines to 10 bullets, tighten rules on when people with mental illnesses can buy guns and require handgun buyers to give fingerprints and get a license. The bill has stalled without a vote in the House Judiciary Committee for nearly a month as delegates consider whether to scale back the proposal to put fewer restrictions on current gun owners and whether exempt some of the weapons O'Malley would like to ban.  Committee Chairman Joseph Vallario, a Prince George's County Democrat, said he expects a vote Friday.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2013
Lawmakers in Congress made no progress Tuesday on ending the budget impasse that has thrown federal agencies in Maryland and elsewhere into the first government shutdown since 1996. There was little indication that either side was prepared to negotiate, as Republicans continued to demand changes to President Barack Obama's health care law in exchange for spending legislation, and Democrats insisted that the issue had already been litigated - and they won. Obama, using some of his sharpest language so far on the budget showdown, said legislation to reopen the government would not be achieved until Republicans in the House of Representatives stopped holding "the entire economy hostage" over what he described as ideological demands.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | September 13, 1995
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton and congressional leaders pledged last night to work together to avert a government shutdown next month, but they cautioned that major differences over the budget still need to be resolved.Mr. Clinton summoned the Republican and Democratic leaders to the White House to begin discussions on avoiding major disruptions to the government when the new fiscal year begins Oct. 1.Spending bills funding government operations are supposed to be enacted and signed into law by Oct. 1, but Congress is far behind in its schedule.
EXPLORE
BY ERIKA BUTLER | Record staff | March 28, 2012
For many years, Havre de Grace elected officials have lamented that no one from "up on the hill" has gotten involved in the city's politics or sought public office. Well, this year, they can stop lamenting. Four of the seven candidates for the three seats up for election on the Havre de Grace City Council are new to the world of politics and three of them come from one community. Robert Sawyer, Barry Scarborough and Joseph Smith all live in the Bulle Rock community, in the overall scheme of things, a new development in Havre de Grace.
NEWS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | March 11, 2003
Maryland Insurance Commissioner Steven B. Larsen told lawmakers yesterday that he has "very little confidence" in the board of CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield, and two key legislative chairmen said they were working on legislation to reform the nonprofit insurer. Before the legislative briefing, Larsen met yesterday with William L. Jews, CareFirst's chief executive officer. David M. Funk, a lawyer for CareFirst who attended the meeting, said the CEO had stressed that he is "interested in reconciliation at this point."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 1, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Even after eliminating half of its hospital beds in the last five years, the federal health care system for military veterans spends more than $1 million a day to operate unneeded hospital buildings, where a dwindling number of veterans receive care in underpopulated wards, federal investigators say.The Department of Veterans Affairs receives more than $17 billion a year to provide health care to veterans, but it spends one-fourth of the...
NEWS
September 12, 2013
As concern over the August chemical attack in Syria heated up and the U.S. was plunged into a debate over the use of military force to punish Syria for its use of internationally banned weapons of mass destruction and terrorism, House leaders wisely indicated that the ongoing standoff over the federal budget and defunding Obamacare - and the real possibility of a government shutdown - would have to be postponed. A stopgap bill, something to keep the government running past the end of the fiscal year on October 1 and into mid-December, was the choice of House Speaker John Boehner and Majority Leader Eric Cantor.
NEWS
By Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2013
Gov. Martin O'Malley's sweeping gun bill that has stalled in the House of Delegates will get a key committee vote on Friday, delegates said. The Maryland Senate in February moved swiftly on legislation that would ban the sale of assault-style rifles, limit magazines to 10 bullets, tighten rules on when people with mental illnesses can buy guns and require handgun buyers to give fingerprints and get a license. The bill has stalled without a vote in the House Judiciary Committee for nearly a month as delegates consider whether to scale back the proposal to put fewer restrictions on current gun owners and whether exempt some of the weapons O'Malley would like to ban.  Committee Chairman Joseph Vallario, a Prince George's County Democrat, said he expects a vote Friday.
EXPLORE
BY ERIKA BUTLER | Record staff | March 28, 2012
For many years, Havre de Grace elected officials have lamented that no one from "up on the hill" has gotten involved in the city's politics or sought public office. Well, this year, they can stop lamenting. Four of the seven candidates for the three seats up for election on the Havre de Grace City Council are new to the world of politics and three of them come from one community. Robert Sawyer, Barry Scarborough and Joseph Smith all live in the Bulle Rock community, in the overall scheme of things, a new development in Havre de Grace.
NEWS
February 18, 2009
The O'Malley administration's attempt to ensure state police can pursue covert operations of legitimate concern on protest groups while protecting civil liberties falls short. That's because it favors the investigators. The legislation now before the Maryland General Assembly has loopholes that even the clumsiest spy could slip through, with or without his trench coat. The state police's past foray into domestic spying demonstrated what can happen when agents work on their own without adequate supervision and guidelines and for an indeterminate period of time: Groups of peaceniks, death penalty opponents and environmentalists are infiltrated without good cause.
NEWS
February 23, 2006
House of Delegates convenes at 10 a.m. Senate convenes at 10 a.m. Hearings of interest: The House Environment Matters Committee holds a working session on eminent domain issues. The meeting is scheduled to begin at 11 a.m. in the Lowe House Office Building committee room. The House Health and Government Operations and Ways and Means committees hold a joint hearing on a bill (HB 3) to create a scholarship program for military veterans who served in Iraq and Afghanistan.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 21, 2003
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- Hours after the United States opened war against Iraq with a surprise missile attack apparently aimed at the Iraqi leadership, the streets in this city of 4.5 million people were deserted. Saddam Hussein went on national television shortly after the bombardment to denounce the attack and President Bush. The Iraqi Information Ministry offered no details of the predawn attack in Baghdad and refused to take reporters to the scene. Instead, the ministry arranged for several busloads of reporters to be taken to a grain storage silo, where the trade minister, Mohammed Mehdi Salah, was presented with a bouquet of flowers by an Australian woman representing a group of peace protesters.
NEWS
March 31, 1998
EFFORTS OF Carroll County government and the school board to cut education costs to help cover a projected $16 million budget deficit in five years are overdue. It's time for the two bodies to explore ways to share certain costs, services and facilities.A list devised by a joint committee of the school board and Carroll County government appears promising. It includes a common warehouse, combining purchases and insurance policies, vehicle maintenance consolidation and shared maintenance and groundskeeping functions.
NEWS
Robert B. Reich | July 16, 2014
Dozens of big U.S. corporations are considering leaving the United States in order to reduce their tax bills. But they'll be leaving the country only on paper. They'll still do as much business in the U.S. as they were doing before. The only difference is they'll no longer be "American" and won't have to pay nearly as much in taxes to the U.S. government. OK. But if they're no longer American citizens, they should no longer be able to spend a penny influencing American politics.
NEWS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | March 11, 2003
Maryland Insurance Commissioner Steven B. Larsen told lawmakers yesterday that he has "very little confidence" in the board of CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield, and two key legislative chairmen said they were working on legislation to reform the nonprofit insurer. Before the legislative briefing, Larsen met yesterday with William L. Jews, CareFirst's chief executive officer. David M. Funk, a lawyer for CareFirst who attended the meeting, said the CEO had stressed that he is "interested in reconciliation at this point."
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 26, 2000
CARLISLE, Pa. - In the shadow of a weeping cherry tree, amid the rows of small, white gravestones, Michael H. Trujillo found her. He knew of her from his grandfather and great-uncle, the girl's brothers. Together the two boys and their sister had journeyed thousands of miles from an Indian pueblo in New Mexico to this place called Pennsylvania to attend a school. They spoke no English. But they would learn to form the sounds and words of this language so unlike their own. They would learn what it meant to be a citizen of the United States.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.