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By Rick Horowitz | December 2, 1990
WHEREAS the Security Council of the United Nations has enacted a series of resolutions in response to Iraq's invasion of Kuwait; andWHEREAS the Security Council has repeatedly reaffirmed these resolutions and called upon the Government of Iraq to end its occupation of Kuwait immediately; andWHEREAS the Government of Iraq has treated these resolutions like fertilizer; andWHEREAS the Security Council strongly endorses the restoration of human rights to...
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NEWS
June 12, 2008
Invasion augments the power of Iran The problem Brooks Tucker overlooks with our occupation of Iraq is this: We have inserted ourselves into a competition between Saudi-backed Sunnis and Iranian-backed Shiites for control of the oil-rich regions of Iraq ("Iraq and the reality of hope," Commentary, June 5). In this conflict, the Bush administration has allied itself with the Supreme Islamic Council of Iraq, the political party running the Iraqi government. Both this party and its militia have strong historic ties to the Islamic dictatorship of Iran, having been financed, armed, trained and provided with haven for years by Iran's government.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 17, 2007
WASHINGTON -- President Bush said yesterday that Iraq had "fumbled" the executions of Saddam Hussein and two of his deputies, and that the government of Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki "has still got some maturation to do." The president's remarks were the most extensive yet on the executions, and they pointed up the continued tensions between Bush and al-Maliki as they try to forge a joint plan to calm the violence gripping Iraq. Bush expressed particular displeasure with the handling of Hussein's hanging in late December, at which guards chanted their allegiance to the radical Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr, who backs al-Maliki and whose militia has been a major source of anti-Sunni violence.
NEWS
By Brian Katulis and Matthew Duss | April 11, 2008
In their testimony before Congress this week, Ambassador Ryan C. Crocker and General David Petraeus portrayed recent clashes between competing Iraqi factions as a fight between the Iraqi government and Iranian-supported groups looking to undermine that government. This simplistic "good guys versus bad guys" depiction masks a much more complicated reality in which U.S. policy in Iraq unwittingly strengthens Iran's overall hand there and around the region. Speaking before Congress, General Petraeus said, "Iran has fueled the violence in a particularly damaging way through its lethal support to the special groups," referring to Shiite splinter groups allegedly receiving support from Iran.
NEWS
By Tina Susman and Tina Susman,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 7, 2007
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- U.S. officials said yesterday that they are working with the Iraqi government to determine whether a member of parliament was a convicted terrorist who had been sentenced to death in Kuwait for bombing the U.S. and French embassies there in 1983. The legislator, Jamal Jaafar Mohammed, was elected in December 2005 to represent Babil, a province south of Baghdad. Sheikh Dhiauddin Fayadh, another legislator, said Mohammed was not aligned with a particular political party and had not been seen since late December.
NEWS
By Peter Spiegel and Peter Spiegel,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 20, 2006
WASHINGTON -- The chairmen of a closely watched commission evaluating U.S. policy in Iraq said yesterday that the government in Baghdad risks losing the support of both the Iraqi people and the American public unless it brings security and public services to the Iraqi people within the next three months. Former Rep. Lee H. Hamilton, co-chairman of the Iraq Study Group with former Secretary of State James A. Baker III, pointed out that the government of Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki has been in place for six months and indicated the commission was disappointed with al-Maliki's lack of progress.
NEWS
By Noam N. Levey and Noam N. Levey,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 18, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Setting up a showdown that could come next week, several anti-war senators, including one Republican, introduced a resolution yesterday opposing President Bush's plan to send more troops to Iraq. The bipartisan resolution drafted by Sens. Joseph R. Biden Jr., a Delaware Democrat; Chuck Hagel, a Nebraska Republican; and Carl Levin, a Michigan Democrat, would have no legal power over what Bush can do in Iraq. But it marks the leading edge of an expanding legislative front that will confront Bush as he tries to chart a new Iraq policy.
NEWS
By Peter Spiegel and Julian E. Barnes and Peter Spiegel and Julian E. Barnes,Los Angeles Times | March 5, 2008
WASHINGTON -- Two top U.S. military commanders said yesterday that Iran continues to train and direct violent Shiite militias in Iraq and is trying to permanently weaken the Iraqi government. Iran has become the biggest long-term threat to Iraqi stability and is encouraging radical Shiite elements to continue attacks while some prominent militia leaders push for cease-fires, said Army Lt. Gen. Raymond T. Odierno, who just completed a 15-month assignment as day-to-day commander in Iraq.
NEWS
By Louise Roug and Louise Roug,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 9, 2007
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- Iraqi security forces yesterday detained a high-level Iraqi official allegedly connected to the killings of Health Ministry officials and responsible for diverting millions of dollars to a Shiite militia, the U.S. military said. The arrest immediately sparked protests among Shiite lawmakers, who described it as an unlawful "kidnapping" and an attack on the "dignity of the Iraqis." The U.S. military also announced the deaths of four Marines in Anbar province. They died in separate attacks Wednesday, according to a military statement.
NEWS
By TRUDY RUBIN | March 6, 2007
PHILADELPHIA -- What's been absent so long in Iraq is a sense of possibility - the possibility that things could improve. Last week, something happened that offers at least a chance of changing Iraq's deadly dynamics. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice announced that the United States would participate in two meetings organized by senior Iraqi officials that will be attended by all of Iraq's neighbors - including Iran and Syria. The first meeting will take place in Baghdad on Saturday.
NEWS
By Peter Spiegel and Julian E. Barnes and Peter Spiegel and Julian E. Barnes,Los Angeles Times | March 5, 2008
WASHINGTON -- Two top U.S. military commanders said yesterday that Iran continues to train and direct violent Shiite militias in Iraq and is trying to permanently weaken the Iraqi government. Iran has become the biggest long-term threat to Iraqi stability and is encouraging radical Shiite elements to continue attacks while some prominent militia leaders push for cease-fires, said Army Lt. Gen. Raymond T. Odierno, who just completed a 15-month assignment as day-to-day commander in Iraq.
NEWS
By Siobhan Gorman and David Wood and Siobhan Gorman and David Wood,Sun reporters | August 24, 2007
WASHINGTON -- As a new U.S. intelligence report cast strong doubt yesterday on the prospects of the al-Maliki government in Iraq, one of the most respected Republicans in Congress on military matters called on President Bush to begin withdrawing troops by Christmas. Sen. John W. Warner of Virginia, just back from his latest visit to Iraq, cited the briefings he received in Baghdad, as well as the just-released National Intelligence Estimate, in calling for a troop reduction this year. Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki and his government "have let our troops down," said Warner, a senior member of the Senate Armed Services Committee and a former Navy secretary.
NEWS
By TRUDY RUBIN | March 6, 2007
PHILADELPHIA -- What's been absent so long in Iraq is a sense of possibility - the possibility that things could improve. Last week, something happened that offers at least a chance of changing Iraq's deadly dynamics. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice announced that the United States would participate in two meetings organized by senior Iraqi officials that will be attended by all of Iraq's neighbors - including Iran and Syria. The first meeting will take place in Baghdad on Saturday.
NEWS
By Louise Roug and Louise Roug,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 9, 2007
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- Iraqi security forces yesterday detained a high-level Iraqi official allegedly connected to the killings of Health Ministry officials and responsible for diverting millions of dollars to a Shiite militia, the U.S. military said. The arrest immediately sparked protests among Shiite lawmakers, who described it as an unlawful "kidnapping" and an attack on the "dignity of the Iraqis." The U.S. military also announced the deaths of four Marines in Anbar province. They died in separate attacks Wednesday, according to a military statement.
NEWS
By Tina Susman and Tina Susman,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 7, 2007
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- U.S. officials said yesterday that they are working with the Iraqi government to determine whether a member of parliament was a convicted terrorist who had been sentenced to death in Kuwait for bombing the U.S. and French embassies there in 1983. The legislator, Jamal Jaafar Mohammed, was elected in December 2005 to represent Babil, a province south of Baghdad. Sheikh Dhiauddin Fayadh, another legislator, said Mohammed was not aligned with a particular political party and had not been seen since late December.
NEWS
By David Wood and David Wood,Sun Reporter | January 31, 2007
WASHINGTON -- As American military commanders struggle with deteriorating security in Iraq, there are growing indications that the $21 billion U.S. reconstruction effort is at risk, including a new report that casts doubt on Iraq's ability to maintain the reconstruction projects that have been completed. The government of Iraq has been unable to boost the production of oil or electricity despite U.S. aid and many critical U.S.-funded projects remain unfinished, according to the latest quarterly report by Stuart W. Bowen, the U.S. special inspector general for Iraqi reconstruction.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 3, 2004
BAGHDAD, Iraq - The United Nations special envoy called on the incoming Iraqi government yesterday to broaden discussions to include Iraqis who oppose the American occupation, and he indicated his own authority in shaping the new government had been sharply limited by U.S. officials. Lakhdar Brahimi, at a news conference wrapping up a nearly monthlong visit here, suggested that the Americans were pursuing a strategy in Iraq that relied too heavily on force and not enough on subtlety and persuasion.
NEWS
By Paul Richter and Borzou Daragahi and Paul Richter and Borzou Daragahi,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 17, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Iraq's prime minister, concerned that the United States might be growing impatient with his government and considering a change in course, sought reassurance from President Bush yesterday that he intends to stick by his commitment to Iraq's government. During a 15-minute morning phone call, Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki told Bush he was concerned by reports that U.S. officials would drop their support for his government if it did not show progress within two months, said White House Press Secretary Tony Snow.
NEWS
By Noam N. Levey and Noam N. Levey,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 18, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Setting up a showdown that could come next week, several anti-war senators, including one Republican, introduced a resolution yesterday opposing President Bush's plan to send more troops to Iraq. The bipartisan resolution drafted by Sens. Joseph R. Biden Jr., a Delaware Democrat; Chuck Hagel, a Nebraska Republican; and Carl Levin, a Michigan Democrat, would have no legal power over what Bush can do in Iraq. But it marks the leading edge of an expanding legislative front that will confront Bush as he tries to chart a new Iraq policy.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 17, 2007
WASHINGTON -- President Bush said yesterday that Iraq had "fumbled" the executions of Saddam Hussein and two of his deputies, and that the government of Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki "has still got some maturation to do." The president's remarks were the most extensive yet on the executions, and they pointed up the continued tensions between Bush and al-Maliki as they try to forge a joint plan to calm the violence gripping Iraq. Bush expressed particular displeasure with the handling of Hussein's hanging in late December, at which guards chanted their allegiance to the radical Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr, who backs al-Maliki and whose militia has been a major source of anti-Sunni violence.
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