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Government Intervention

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NEWS
July 19, 1991
The Trouble with reading George's lipsSelf-made?If Clarence Thomas truly believes he is a self-made success who has benefited neither from the victories of the civil rights struggles nor government intervention, he belongs not on the Supreme Court but in Disneyworld.McNair TaylorBaltimore
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NEWS
January 28, 2014
Frederick Mathis wrote in favor of having the state legislature raise the age to buy cigarettes ( "Raise the tobacco purchase age to 21," Jan. 26). Many people decry a government action such as this as an intervention into one's free choice. Respecting that position, that it is one's Fourth Amendment right not to have private choices infringed upon by the government, may I suggest that taxpayers who subsidize their choices with eventual Medicare costs or augmented health care costs and premiums have the right not have to pay for the free and poor choices of those who willingly choose to behave in a habit that is documented as being dangerous and destructive to their health?
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NEWS
By DAN BERGER | June 26, 1992
Georgia's nationalist hero who was elected and deposed is leading a rebellion. Only now he is the fascist villain and the former Commie tyrant is the democratic good guy. Right?Pretty soon the right-wingers will mobilize to throw out the Reagan-Bush-Rehnquist Supreme Court.It turns out the people are for Perot but the Commie-rat-turncoat-conspirators are against him. Just ask him.A lot of people want a free market economy to work its problems out with no meddlesome government intervention -- until they hear there's a rail strike.
NEWS
September 13, 2012
Former President Bill Clinton told the Democratic National Convention that President Obama has a plan to rescue the economy but that Republicans have stood in his way. From this you might think that the economy requires government intervention to create jobs. But history tells a different story. For the first 150 years of this country's existence, the federal government felt no great need to "do something" when the economy turned down. One of the last "do-nothing" presidents was Warren G. Harding.
NEWS
September 13, 2012
Former President Bill Clinton told the Democratic National Convention that President Obama has a plan to rescue the economy but that Republicans have stood in his way. From this you might think that the economy requires government intervention to create jobs. But history tells a different story. For the first 150 years of this country's existence, the federal government felt no great need to "do something" when the economy turned down. One of the last "do-nothing" presidents was Warren G. Harding.
NEWS
January 28, 2014
Frederick Mathis wrote in favor of having the state legislature raise the age to buy cigarettes ( "Raise the tobacco purchase age to 21," Jan. 26). Many people decry a government action such as this as an intervention into one's free choice. Respecting that position, that it is one's Fourth Amendment right not to have private choices infringed upon by the government, may I suggest that taxpayers who subsidize their choices with eventual Medicare costs or augmented health care costs and premiums have the right not have to pay for the free and poor choices of those who willingly choose to behave in a habit that is documented as being dangerous and destructive to their health?
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,Sun Staff Writer | February 7, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The negotiations have resumed under the threat of federal action to impose a settlement in the nearly six-month baseball strike, but a union-appointed member of baseball's economic study committee said last week that there is little economic justification for government intervention.Economist Henry J. Aaron of the Brookings Institute said that the regional economic stress caused by the baseball work stoppage is not significant enough to warrant special legislation to force an end to the dispute.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | February 15, 1994
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton's economists want the government to do more to tweak the economy, addressing areas like health care and technological research where they think the free market has failed.They put forward their most comprehensive version of this view yesterday, releasing their first Economic Report to Congress, an annual book-length document mandated by Congress since 1946.While recent reports by Republican administrations have broadly criticized the government, contending it played too great a role in the economy, the new document calls for a lower threshold for government intervention.
NEWS
By Floyd Norris | August 20, 1998
FINANCIAL MARKETS are again under stress in Asia and Russia, and local authorities know whom to blame. It's the speculators."Speculators have been deploying a whole host of improper measures," said Donald Tsang, Hong Kong's financial secretary, as he disclosed that the Hong Kong government had bought millions of dollars in stock. Among them were the "spreading of vicious rumors" that Hong Kong's currency might be devalued.Hong Kong's stocks rallied, and the idea of government intervention is spreading.
NEWS
September 6, 2006
State must promote energy alternatives In "Socialism at the pump" (Opinion * Commentary, Aug. 30), Steve Chapman criticizes the Department of Energy for offering financial inducements to develop alternative energy technologies. In support of his position, Mr. Chapman observes that "if modern science offers feasible ways to produce cheaper sources of motor fuel, there is no need for this type of government intervention. And if it doesn't, there is no point." I respectfully disagree. When oil prices are high, gasoline is expensive, and it becomes economically feasible to develop alternative fuels.
NEWS
January 14, 2010
Some things have changed in the banking industry and some haven't. In the fall of 2008 Wall Street was on the brink of financial disaster, and only extraordinary federal intervention, including a $700 billion bank bailout fund, spared the industry from ruin. Fast-forward to the present, where many financial giants are set to post big profits thanks to a market rebound - and the largesse of U.S. taxpayers. But old habits die hard: Wall Street is set to award some of the biggest bonuses in history.
NEWS
By CYNTHIA TUCKER | April 8, 2008
Talk about hypocrisy. When the housing bubble started to burst more than a year ago, the airwaves and news pages were full of denunciations of reckless and irresponsible homeowners. Not only conservative members of Congress but also many economists and average citizens were united in their contempt for the dummies in foreclosure, who, they said, were undeserving of taxpayer-funded bailouts. My, how things have changed. Suddenly, Congress and the Federal Reserve Bank have discovered a crisis deserving of tens of billions - perhaps hundreds of billions - in cheap loans, tax credits and other subsidies.
NEWS
By Maura Reynolds and Noam N. Levey | March 28, 2008
The deteriorating economy took center stage in the presidential election yesterday as Democrat Barack Obama called for tighter regulation of financial markets and party rival Hillary Clinton proposed more retraining for displaced workers, contrasting sharply with Republican John McCain over how much the government should intervene. The economy has been the No. 1 issue for voters for months, but the candidates have embraced the issue more slowly. This week, however, all three gave major addresses that added significant detail to their prescriptions for the ailing economy.
NEWS
By Cynthia Tucker | January 1, 2007
ATLANTA -- There are many Americans who remain deeply skeptical of government involvement in affairs of personal health - whether laws regulating seat-belt use or bans on smoking in public places. But the data are clear: When government starts a crusade to improve habits of personal health, from seat-belt use to breast cancer screening, lives are saved and disabilities avoided. It's high time, then, for government to use its powers of persuasion - and coercion - to confront the obesity crisis and its impact on public health.
NEWS
September 6, 2006
State must promote energy alternatives In "Socialism at the pump" (Opinion * Commentary, Aug. 30), Steve Chapman criticizes the Department of Energy for offering financial inducements to develop alternative energy technologies. In support of his position, Mr. Chapman observes that "if modern science offers feasible ways to produce cheaper sources of motor fuel, there is no need for this type of government intervention. And if it doesn't, there is no point." I respectfully disagree. When oil prices are high, gasoline is expensive, and it becomes economically feasible to develop alternative fuels.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK and JAY HANCOCK,SUN COLUMNIST | March 29, 2006
It's "anti-business" to advocate tougher Maryland regulation for electric utilities and rate relief for Baltimore Gas and Electric customers, say several thoughtful readers. Cracking down on BGE and parent Constellation Energy jeopardizes their planned merger with FPL Group and worsens Maryland's reputation as a business abuser, they say. The episode joins Maryland embarrassments such as last year's requirement for better employee medical coverage at Wal-Mart; the 2002 rejection of the WellPoint/CareFirst insurance merger; and the 1981 interest-rate caps that drove credit-card concern MBNA to relocate its headquarters from Maryland to Delaware, they contend.
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Sun Staff Writer | December 8, 1994
Invoking Thomas Jefferson on the dangers of government debt and excessive taxation, the Howard County Chamber of Commerce yesterday called for a frugal government that gives private industry more freedom to flourish.At its annual legislative breakfast in Columbia, attended by about 75 business people and politicians, the business group's legislative committee urged the county's state and local lawmakers to hold the line on taxes, privatize some government services and trim regulations.It also said lawmakers should improve transportation systems, scrutinize education spending and push to have such expensive programs as health care insurance and wetlands conservation administered at the state, rather than the federal, level.
NEWS
October 4, 1994
As Americans become more unwilling to let government care for the needy, the role of reputable charitable organizations such as the United Way of Central Maryland becomes increasingly important.A recent Times Mirror Inc. survey indicates that fewer Americans than ever believe government ought to help the less fortunate, largely because they don't trust government to spend their money wisely, partly because they are feeling self-absorbed and impatient with the plight of others. It has become easy to stereotype "the needy" as derelicts who refuse to work for a living.
NEWS
By MARIO VILLARREAL | September 29, 2005
WASHINGTON -- Tragedy and need frequently give weight to arguments for increased government intervention in the economy. Times of crisis - such as we are experiencing now in the aftermath of two hurricanes - inevitably result in a ratcheting up of government spending and additional regulatory controls. A case in point is the consideration, once again, of price-gouging laws. Maryland Del. James W. Hubbard, a Prince George's County Democrat, is working on legislation that would grant Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. authority to impose price controls on certain key supplies, such as gas, during emergencies.
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