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AEGIS STAFF REPORT | March 13, 2012
Harford County government employees collected more than eight tons of food to help less fortunate residents of the county and the region in conjunction with the annual Harvest for the Hungry campaign. The food collected last week was delivered to the parking lot of the county office building at 220 S. Main St. in Bel Air Friday morning where Harford County Executive David Craig and other county officials and the staff of the Harford Community Action Agency were by joined by Harvest for the Hungry founder and Harford resident Larry Adam.
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NEWS
October 3, 2014
American voters and taxpayers, it's time to wake up and clean house in Washington ( "Secret Service allowed armed man with criminal record on elevator with Obama," Oct. 1). We have the VA scandal with cooking the books and stealing our tax dollars in the form of bonuses they did not earn while lawmakers in Washington gave the agency another $17 billion without firing anyone or prosecuting anyone. Now we have the Secret Service not protecting the president. I don't know about other taxpayers but I have grown sick and tired of government employees spending my money and not doing their jobs.
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NEWS
By BRIAN SULLAM | July 21, 1996
AMERICANS ARE in a surly mood, and, of late, much of their indignation has been directed toward government employees.It doesn't matter whether these workers are federal, state or local; they are treated with contempt usually reserved for the most indolent and nonproductive members of society.We got a glimmer of the intensity of this earlier this month when the Anne Arundel County Council heard testimony on proposed changes to the county pension system designed to save taxpayers money.Dvorak's expletivesAnne Arundel's Chief Administrative Officer Robert J. Dvorak, himself a highly paid public employee, exploded at a council hearing amid snickering by much-lower-paid county workers.
NEWS
By John Fritze and By John Fritze | September 6, 2014
Federal employees will be allowed to carry money on their health savings accounts into the next year following a months-long lobbying effort by Sen. Ben Cardin of Maryland and other lawmakers in the region. Some 323,000 federal workers set aside a portion of their earnings, tax-free, in flexible spending accounts, or FSAs, to pay for health expenses. Until now, they have forfeited money not spent by the end of the year. The Office of Personnel Management announced last week that employees would be allowed to carry over up to $500 beginning in 2015.
NEWS
October 19, 2008
Howard County Executive Ken Ulman has announced a new RideShare program for Howard County government employees. Those interested can go to the county's intranet to complete a registration form; the program will match registrants with other employees interested in joining a car pool. Residents who are not government employees may also take advantage of the program. The program, which offers a way to calculate how much drivers spend on commuting and how much they will save by car pooling, is part of the county's effort to address rising fuel costs and promote a more sustainable environment.
SPORTS
By Baltimoresun.com Staff | August 31, 2004
In recognition of Labor Day, the Orioles are offering discounted tickets to federal government employees and their families for their 1:35 p.m. game on Sept. 6 against the Minnesota Twins. Federal government employees and contractors, military personnel and their family members may purchase left field lower box seats for $20 or upper reserve tickets for $8. Individual tickets may be purchased in person at the Orioles ticket office or by calling 1-888-848-BIRD. Fans will need to provide a valid government photo ID if purchasing tickets in person or the name of the federal government agency or department and ID number if ordering by phone.
NEWS
February 16, 2011
If the President really wants to cut the budget, let him, starting with himself, his Cabinet, Congress and all their staff and advisors, and all the non-uniformed government employees. Cut their salaries and benefits by 10 percent. This would work for all the state governments as well. Dr. Arthur S. Jensen, Parkville
NEWS
October 23, 2013
Gubernatorial candidates David R. Craig and Doug F. Gansler promise tax breaks for pensioners, so why is it OK for politicians to discriminate against all other retirees living in Maryland? ("Craig, Gansler pledge tax breaks for pensioners," Oct. 18). I have lived in Maryland for 66 years and paid taxes. I worked for 47 years before retiring. My taxes have paid for the pensions of thousands of government employees who never paid into their own pensions. J. Heming, Baltimore
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 2, 1996
WASHINGTON -- The Clinton administration is pressing ahead with a plan to transform background investigations of many government employees into a profit-making business run by a newly created private company, despite protests from some members of Congress, Cabinet officials, and investigators worried about confidentiality and security lapses.Under the plan, which has been in the works for a year and a half and will take effect at the end of this week, about 40 percent of security and other background checks on government employees and job applicants will be taken over by an employee-owned, profit-seeking company.
NEWS
By Carol Emert and Carol Emert,States News Service | April 8, 1992
Random drug tests of drivers ruled outWASHINGTON -- Government employees have won another drug-testing victory with a federal judge declaring that random testing for Department of Health and Human Services drivers is "unreasonable and hence unconstitutional."Advocates of federal workers say this is just the latest round in the battle against a 1986 executive order that instituted a program of mandatory random drug testing of government employees.Since then, the American Federation of Government Employees, the National Treasury Employees Union and the American Civil Liberties Union have engaged in a number of court challenges to narrow the scope of the testing.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | June 23, 2014
For understandable reasons, the IRS scandal has largely focused on the political question of whether the White House deliberately targeted opponents. To date there's no evidence that it did. That's good for the president, but it may not be good for the country, because if the administration didn't target opponents, that would mean the IRS has become corrupt all on its own. In 1939, Bruno Rizzi, a largely forgotten communist intellectual, wrote a hugely controversial book, "The Bureaucratization of the World.
NEWS
By John Fritze and The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2014
WASHINGTON -- He won't face a challenge in next week's primary election, but Rep. John Delaney nevertheless began running television advertisements on Wednesday. The Potomac Democrat is buying airtime to highlight what has been his signature legislative effort since arriving in Congress last year, a proposal to allow companies to repatriate a portion of their overseas cash, tax free, if they make investments in the nation's infrastructure. The spot is running on broadcast television in Hagerstown, Md., and on cable in the Washington media market.
NEWS
April 9, 2014
Perhaps lawmakers and federal employees should be less concerned about themselves and more concerned about the morale of their employers, the American taxpayers ("Half of federal workforce considering private sector," Feb. 23). Lawmakers passed the health care bill without reading it, promised we could keep our insurance and doctors and pledged to reduce insurance costs, none of which happened. Rep. Elijah Cummings didn't care about the 73,000 Marylanders who lost their health care.
NEWS
March 22, 2014
Who in local and state government is in charge of watching and controlling how our tax dollars are spent ( "Pratt, Young object to plan to hire outside auditors for city agencies," March 20)? We know that Gov. Martin O'Malley wasted over $200 million on a health care exchange that does not work. We have seen public employees in Baltimore being paid the wrong salary for years. When are Maryland voters going to demand accountability from government employees like the private sector does?
NEWS
Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | March 17, 2014
The Baltimore Sun has recently reviewed hundreds of workers' compensation claims at government agencies in the area. Many were quite serious: Teachers were frequently assaulted in schools; police were often injured on the city's dangerous streets; firefighters were burnt rushing into blazing buildings. But other claims were somewhat less compelling. Government employees are eligible to file for compensation if they are hurt on the job, and that can happen in many ways. Here are some of the oddest filings we spotted: •An Anne Arundel County government worker filed a claim after a "big gust of wind knocked her off her feet and she fell over backwards.
NEWS
March 4, 2014
I have seen in The Sun several times lately stories about the hard times the poor federal employees are having ( "Half of federal employees considering leaving for the private sector, survey finds," Feb. 21). Let me tell you that they are some of the most cared for government employees of any type. Maryland is supposed to be the richest state with annual personal income of about $78,000 per household, according to the newspaper. Those annual salaries are a direct result of those federal workers who reside in Maryland, not the rest of us. I don't know anyone who makes that kind of money.
NEWS
By Carol Emert and Carol Emert,States News Service | June 24, 1992
U.S. renews court battle over speech incomeWASHINGTON -- The Justice Department is continuing its legal battle to prevent federal workers from earning income from outside speaking and writing engagements.Federal workers thought victory was at hand in March when U.S. District Court Judge Robert Penfield Jackson ruled that the congressionally mandated ban on honorariums violates First Amendment rights to free speech.But Judge Jackson left the ban in effect for a 90-day period, during which the Justice Department could appeal the case.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2014
Howard Friedman has heard the chatter from his own community to Capitol Hill - sometimes questions, sometimes complaints about the federal workforce, its size and its cost. The Gaithersburg man, an attorney and union leader at the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, wants to change the conversation. "We've been criticized far too long, strictly on matters dealing with the size of the workforce and our compensation," he said. "I think people don't really understand the direct connection between what we do and the quality of life in our country for taxpayers and for everybody.
NEWS
December 10, 2013
The important word in today's article by Michael Dresser regarding the criticism of those involved in Maryland's health care insurance exchange is "contractors" ("O'Malley and Brown hammered on website," Dec. 9). In the zeal to privatize all things run in government in recent years from federal level to the town hall, "contractors" have been hired to do the work. Government employees, again from the local to the highest level, have been demonized to the point that their use is almost non-existent.
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