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NEWS
December 1, 2010
Since the sole purpose of freezing federal pay ( "The call for civil sacrifice," Dec. 1) is to show fiscal discipline, if we freeze pay on all government workers we must include all employees of government contractors, and reduce contractors' pay to the equivalent government job they are replacing. It would make government more efficient. For those contractors that have overhead expenses like executive pay in excess of the equivalent government executive, obviously we cannot afford, with our budget deficit, to keep them on and would have to save money by bringing the jobs into the government.
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NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2014
The number of federal contractors that have been suspended or excluded from future contracts for poor performance has more than doubled in the past five years - a development that watchdogs inside and outside of government say is positive. The Government Accountability Office reported last month that contractor suspensions and debarments rose from 1,836 in 2009 to 4,812 in 2013. The GAO, the investigative arm of Congress, said the numbers reflect greater oversight of projects that use taxpayer money - and show that more contractors are suffering consequences for overbilling, subpar performance or ethical breaches.
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BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | April 23, 2003
WASHINGTON - A U.S. appeals court upheld yesterday President Bush's order requiring government contractors to tell workers they don't have to join unions or pay dues that are used to promote organized labor's political agenda. The decision will ensure that 1.8 million employees of government contractors who pay union dues will be told they may choose that their money not be used for political purposes, according to the National Right to Work Foundation, a group that opposes compulsory union membership.
BUSINESS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2014
In a 20,000-square-foot warehouse, where visitors are required to trade in a driver's license for a visitor's badge, some of the nation's secrets are torn apart, reduced to sand or demagnetized until they are forever silent. "We make things go away," said Arleen Chafitz, owner and CEO of e-End Secure Data Sanitization and Electronics Recycling. Her husband, Steve Chafitz, is the company's president. The firm's clients include the Department of Defense and other federal agencies.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | February 2, 2013
Catonsville-based Alpha Omega Technologies performs work for one federal agency, and it wants more contracts - a daunting goal for a small company in a time of tight budgets. But the head of the 25-person software firm thinks he has a leg up after months of assistance from industry veterans, introductions to federal decision-makers, advice about how to get a foot in the door with the National Security Agency, and lots of specifics about how other companies succeeded or got tripped up in pursuing and handling federal work.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | July 22, 2000
WASHINGTON - About 50 top contractors have kept getting government money despite guilty pleas or settlements in civil and criminal fraud cases since 1995, according to a recent General Accounting Office study. Whether prospective contractors should be penalized for fraud or violating labor, environmental and other federal regulations is a hot Capitol Hill issue these days, pitting Republicans in Congress against the Clinton administration and big business against big labor. The general idea of contractor reform was to allow federal agencies to deny business to contractors that lack a satisfactory record of integrity and business ethics, according to the proposal.
NEWS
By Sidney Rocke | March 7, 2007
By failing to enact a false claims act, our state is missing an important safeguard against fraud and waste of taxpayer dollars. The federal government has had its False Claims Act, or FCA, in place since the Civil War - when the Union Army realized it was being swindled by unscrupulous contractors who were supplying lame mules, yet charging for healthy animals. In a reaction to what we would today call blatant rip-offs, Congress passed a law allowing the government to respond to these false claims by seeking triple damages and additional hefty penalties.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2013
A study released Monday by a leading federal employees union finds government agencies could realize as much as 90 percent of the money they would need to save under massive budget cuts from contractors -- sparing federal workers. The study, written by University of Baltimore law professor Charles Tiefer, comes as agencies, employees and contractors are bracing for $85 billion in across-the-board federal spending cuts, known as sequestration, that will begin March 1 if Congress does not act. The American Federation of Government Employees, which published the report, has sought to shift the focus of those cuts to contractors, even as the Obama administration has sent guidance to agencies directing managers to prepare for furloughs if sequestration takes effect.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2013
As federal agencies pull back on spending, 7Delta's strategy is thinking big. The Columbia information technology firm, which grew by focusing on work for one federal agency, is going after larger contracts and broadening its reach. It's a diversification tactic that other federal contractors at the smaller end of the scale are trying, too: expansion in a time of retrenchment. Deltek, a Virginia IT firm that provides services to government contractors and other businesses, is seeing that trend - but warns that it cuts both ways.
NEWS
EDITORIAL FROM THE AEGIS | March 13, 2013
Making sure 21,000 people can get to and from work is a logistics nightmare. To put the number into some kind of perspective, it is about three and a half times the number of people who can be seated at Ripken Stadium in Aberdeen, or a little less than half of a capacity crowd at Oriole Park at Camden Yards. Consider also that Aberdeen Proving Ground has limited access through guarded gates for going in and out, roughly comparable to the situation for a stadium parking lot. Then there's the matter of most people who go to a ballgame are likely to be riding with at least one other person, whereas carpooling to work isn't as prevalent.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2013
Maryland employers cut 8,900 jobs in September and October, almost entirely before the partial federal shutdown, according to data released Friday. The U.S. Department of Labor, which released both months at once as a result of shutdown delays, said the bulk of the drop occurred in September. The agency estimated the state lost 400 jobs in October. Maryland's labor secretary, Leonard J. Howie III, blamed some of those cuts on "the ongoing uncertainty created by the sequester" - federal cuts rippling through agencies this year.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2013
At least 100 federal workers usually crowd the Salsa Grill in Woodlawn for lunch. By Friday, the fourth day of the partial federal government shutdown, their numbers dwindled to three. The Peruvian eatery - across from the Social Security Administration and near the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services - counts on those agencies for about half its customers. "The restaurant business, it's small margins, and this is not going to help me at all," said Jay Angle, the owner and chef.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2013
As federal agencies pull back on spending, 7Delta's strategy is thinking big. The Columbia information technology firm, which grew by focusing on work for one federal agency, is going after larger contracts and broadening its reach. It's a diversification tactic that other federal contractors at the smaller end of the scale are trying, too: expansion in a time of retrenchment. Deltek, a Virginia IT firm that provides services to government contractors and other businesses, is seeing that trend - but warns that it cuts both ways.
NEWS
EDITORIAL FROM THE AEGIS | March 13, 2013
Making sure 21,000 people can get to and from work is a logistics nightmare. To put the number into some kind of perspective, it is about three and a half times the number of people who can be seated at Ripken Stadium in Aberdeen, or a little less than half of a capacity crowd at Oriole Park at Camden Yards. Consider also that Aberdeen Proving Ground has limited access through guarded gates for going in and out, roughly comparable to the situation for a stadium parking lot. Then there's the matter of most people who go to a ballgame are likely to be riding with at least one other person, whereas carpooling to work isn't as prevalent.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2013
A study released Monday by a leading federal employees union finds government agencies could realize as much as 90 percent of the money they would need to save under massive budget cuts from contractors -- sparing federal workers. The study, written by University of Baltimore law professor Charles Tiefer, comes as agencies, employees and contractors are bracing for $85 billion in across-the-board federal spending cuts, known as sequestration, that will begin March 1 if Congress does not act. The American Federation of Government Employees, which published the report, has sought to shift the focus of those cuts to contractors, even as the Obama administration has sent guidance to agencies directing managers to prepare for furloughs if sequestration takes effect.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | February 2, 2013
Catonsville-based Alpha Omega Technologies performs work for one federal agency, and it wants more contracts - a daunting goal for a small company in a time of tight budgets. But the head of the 25-person software firm thinks he has a leg up after months of assistance from industry veterans, introductions to federal decision-makers, advice about how to get a foot in the door with the National Security Agency, and lots of specifics about how other companies succeeded or got tripped up in pursuing and handling federal work.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2012
Northrop Grumman Corp. says it is already having difficulty attracting bright, tech-savvy workers. The CEO of Lockheed Martin Corp. told Congress this month that his company could have to lay off thousands of employees. They and other Maryland defense contractors are asking lawmakers for details on the so-called sequester — deep budget cuts, including $800 billion to defense spending, due to strike Jan. 2 because the congressional supercommittee failed last year to reach a deficit-reduction agreement.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2013
Maryland employers cut 8,900 jobs in September and October, almost entirely before the partial federal shutdown, according to data released Friday. The U.S. Department of Labor, which released both months at once as a result of shutdown delays, said the bulk of the drop occurred in September. The agency estimated the state lost 400 jobs in October. Maryland's labor secretary, Leonard J. Howie III, blamed some of those cuts on "the ongoing uncertainty created by the sequester" - federal cuts rippling through agencies this year.
NEWS
By Lisa Mascaro, Kathleen Hennessey, Michael A. Memoli and John Fritze, Tribune Newspapers | January 1, 2013
Hours before a midnight deadline Monday, the White House reached a tentative deal with Congress to stop an enormous tax hike for all but the wealthiest households and to postpone for two months tough decisions on how to cut federal spending. After a rare holiday session that lasted through the New Year's Eve celebration and two hours into New Year's Day, the Senate voted, 89 to 8, to approve the proposal. Republican leaders in the House had balked at holding a vote in the dark of night, but are expected to bring the bill up later Tuesday.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2012
Northrop Grumman Corp. says it is already having difficulty attracting bright, tech-savvy workers. The CEO of Lockheed Martin Corp. told Congress this month that his company could have to lay off thousands of employees. They and other Maryland defense contractors are asking lawmakers for details on the so-called sequester — deep budget cuts, including $800 billion to defense spending, due to strike Jan. 2 because the congressional supercommittee failed last year to reach a deficit-reduction agreement.
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